Archives for category: Design

Digital three-dimensional renderings have come a long way. So far, in fact, that it’s often difficult to tell if something is real or rendered. South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyuin Shim capitalizes on that obscured distinction in his digital sculptures. Focusing on dysmorphic views of the human body, Shim creates these fascinating, and in some ways, disconcerting human forms. There’s a paradox at play here… a certain beauty, yet depravity in the way Shim morphs these figures in unexpected ways.

Via Behance

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London-based mixed media artist Nick Gentry, like many other creative individuals, creates artwork partly as a means to disseminate some sort of commentary. Gentry’s work is not only visually stunning, but also touches on the evolution of “consumerism, technology, identity and cyberculture in society, with a distinctive focus on obsolete media.” Gentry recycles such outdated media, like floppy disks and film negatives, and transforms them into arresting mosaics with layers of detail and nuance. And the details are not only aesthetic, but also in the media themselves, which once seemingly held a level of importance to their owners…  Gentry’s work could be seen as a mode of preservation, if you will. And he even engages viewers in his innovative “social” art by soliciting donations of otherwise discarded media. Brilliant.

Books available here.

Via nickgentry.com

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Not only is recent graduate Sean Loose a stellar illustrator, he also has a rather distinctive style. Loose graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design in illustration and design, and takes with him an impressive body of work for such a newbie. We love his flair for geometric mod design… it doesn’t feel self-indulgent, and works particularly well in his Lucas Theatre series. We look forward to him breaking loose in the design world and making his mark.

Via looseillustration.com and Behance

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Part photojournalism, part fine art photography, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s “Aerial Views Adria” project plays to a variety of senses. These extraordinary photographs not only satisfy our own desire for visual symmetry and orderliness, they also feature a pleasing spectrum of colors. Perhaps the most amazing thing about this series is that it’s not Photoshopped. Lang captured authentic aerial views of seaside resorts at the Adriatic coastline in Italy, between Ravenna and Rimini. Be sure to check out his body of work, it’s really quite something.

Via bernhardlang.de and Behance

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For Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata it’s not enough to be a wonderful painter, he is also a incredible sculptor. And Ohata creates brilliant works of art by marrying the two. This technique, of having a sculpture virtually leaping from a painting, is not extraneously employed by Ohata. He is a masterful storyteller, and the use of three-demensionality only advances his visual narrative. With childhood and innocence as a common theme, Ohata’s work is almost cinematic in style and execution. It’s like nothing we’ve ever seen… but we can’t get enough of it!

Via yukari-art.jp and Facebook

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UK-based illustrator/designer Andy Fairhurst has amazing artistic abilities, specifically in the realm of what he refers to as “digital painting”, his tools of the trade being his iMac, digital pen and tablet. He also has a strong affinity for science-fiction and fantasy. Together these talents and interests have given birth to quite a body of work in a style all Fairhurst’s own. There’s a common stylistic thread throughout his works that we really love, and his sense of composition is particularly striking. Reimagining movie posters is a long tradition (as exhibited here and here and here), and Fairhurst’s work is among some of the best we’ve seen.

Via andyfairhurstart.com

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The faces on U.S. bank notes are so ubiquitous that we barely notice them anymore. But San Francisco-based artist James Charles is intimately familiar with the intricacies of U.S. currency portraits. Charles is a mixed media artist with an array of talents, one of which is illustrative portraiture. By sort of a happy accident — he began drawing on dollar bills for fun… what he calls “self-amusement” — Charles altered presidents’ faces in all sorts of ways. Before long, he had an incredible series that continues to grow. His attention to detail is nothing short of incredible, even modifying the lettering along the bottom of the note with the title of each piece. The subject matter ranges, which is part of the brilliance of this series as a whole. Though he never explicitly states it, Charles seems to be using his art as commentary for how pop culture is such a driving force in American economics today.

Via 333portraits.com and shootinggallerysf.com

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Yes, we know, we know… animals taking on human characteristics is a bit gimmicky. It’s a practice that’s been around forever, and one that never ceases to rouse wonderment in the eyes of children the world over (and those young at heart, too). But this series by Barcelona-based photographer/filmmaker Yago Partal is somehow different. Partal captures the essence and perceived “personalities” of various animals through a fusion of photography and illustration in a really special way. His execution of this series, which began as just a few photos for a larger project, is flawless. In his own words, Partal comments in the third person: “Influenced since childhood by stories of wildlife, fashion and cartoons, he found his own voice in a game that many like to play: humanizing animals. The project, with no other pretentiousness than to have fun and set apart his work, tries to do something different….” The pairing of wardrobe with animal is both humorous and thought-provoking. We really love this ongoing series. Merch featuring these fantastic photos available here. This series brings to mind another collection of stellar artwork that depicts the humanization of animals (here).

Via zooportraits.com

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The talent coming out of Savannah College of Art and Design is quite remarkable. And the work of SCAD senior Weston Doty, currently studying Graphic Design and Photography, is particularly notable. We’re especially taken with Doty’s project titled Split, which he describes as “observation & experimentation of form + color”. We admit that we have an affinity for food-related design (as evidenced here and here and here), but Doty’s keen sense of color and composition are what really draw us to this series. Doty exhibits an air of design maturity in his work, and we imagine he will be making his mark in the design community for years to come (his terrific name can’t hurt either).

Via Behance

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Typography geeks everywhere (including ourselves) are applauding (or should be applauding) Canadian designer/art director Sean Williams for a job well done on his growing series of musical artist portraits made entirely of lyrics and song titles. Many have tried, but we’re not sure any attempts are nearly as successful as these conceptually strong, brilliantly executed pieces. Williams masterfully warps typographic forms to create instantly recognizable faces of some of the biggest players in music today. What an amazing tribute by a super talented designer… hats off to him. Williams has even begun branching out beyond music; the possibilities are endless. Merchandise available here.

Via seaningsdesign.com

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