Archives for category: Design

Infographics, by design, are meant to present complex information quickly and clearly. And given our ever shortening attention span (digesting information in the form of Tweets, texts, etc.), the proliferation of infographics is upon us. Munich-based design studio Kurzgesagt (German for “in a nutshell“) is particularly adept at breaking down information and presenting it in an engaging and comprehensible fashion. When applied to traditional cornerstones of education like the solar system, or even current topics of interest like fracking or the situation in Iraq, infographics from Kurzgesagt, led by Philipp Dettmer and Stephan Rether, are able to inform and captivate in extraordinary ways. Kurzgesagt says it best when describing their terrific piece The Solar System: Our Home in Space: “The solar system – well known from countless documentaries. 3D animation on black background. This infographic videos tries something different. Animated infographics and a focus on minimalistic design puts the information up front. We take the viewer on a trip through the solar system, visiting planets, asteroids and the sun.” This piece should be a primer for all secondary school-aged students when learning about basic astronomy. From a design perspective, their sense of typography and color, as well as their use of flat animation, are spot on. Be sure to check out their piece on Iraq… we certainly learned a thing or two.

Via kurzgesagt.org

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Creating an original typeface is no easy feat. And one that is animated, engaging and thematically relevant to the concept at hand? You guessed it… tremendously challenging. Madrid-based designer/art director Noelia Lozano has created one such design for a project entitled Curiosity is the Key. Lozano worked in collaboration with The Poool magazine, part of the OFFF Festival 2014, an international festival held in Barcelona every year that attracts offline/online designers, motion designers, thinkers, sound designers, graphic designers, theorists, developers, professionals, students (basically curious creative types). Noelia was given the magazine statement, along with the theme, and off she went: “We hate expectations. We are bigger than reality. We want to dive in what’s behind the real world. Dive deeper with what we want to know without expecting it. The Poool is the place to be, it is your escape, your answer, and the feeling of scratching your itchiness.” In her own words, Lozano explains: “My work is in relation to that which helps me to keep working every day …curiosity.”

Via noelialozano.com

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<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/95064983″>CURIOSITY IS THE KEY</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/user4948198″>NOELIA LOZANO</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a&gt;.</p>

Fashion draws inspiration from a wide array or sources. And art certainly draws from fashion in much the same way. This cyclical phenomenon is evident in this terrific series by French duo Thomas Couderc and Clément Vauchez, otherwise known as Helmo. Aptly titled “Bêtes de mode” (Fashion Animals), each piece depicts a fashion model in blue, with a thematically complimentary animal superimposed in red. The series has been on display in the windows of iconic upscale Paris department store Galeries Lafayette on Hausmann Boulevard. To capitalize on the duotone effect, the installation featured colored gels to reveal just the model portrait or animal portrait, depending on which one the viewer looked through. This technique is sort of reminiscent of those old school 3D glasses, with the red and blue lenses. Just brilliant. Get the full effect through the video below..

Via helmo.fr

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Collage work, though we’ve all created some form of it from an early age, is way more difficult than it looks… especially at a masterful level of fine art. Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is one such master, who marries traditional media and generative computer code in unexpected ways. Albiac’s series “You are not in the news” explores the relationship between self-worth and media exposure. These compositions are striking, to say the least. And a glimpse into Albiac’s process makes them that much more special. In his own words: “When I code a generative sketch, I introduce control (the sentences that govern the sketching action) and also a degree of randomness in the code. This is a machine control/randomness balance. Then, I select certain outputs (again, human control) and I paint a canvas using the selected generative images as an starting point, without the aim of exact reproduction. The act of painting is a struggle between control and randomness because, depending of the painting technique, paint behavior cannot be totally controlled by the painter. In this way, I explore a fascinating “dialogue” between control/randomness and machine/human interaction. It makes sense to me. I feel connected to artistic tradition but using the generative sketchbook process, I can create in a very contemporary and innovative way that deeply reflects the ideas I need to express.” Just brilliant

Previous post about a very different approach to generative art here. And more collage work here.

Via sergioalbiac.com

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It is often said that artists and writers reflect on their own lives and experiences through their work. If that’s the case here, French illustrator/designer Belhoula Amir has felt lots of isolation in his life. Or he’s just very adept at telling stories that put our place in the world in a unique perspective through his beautiful pictures. Either way, these series of works, under the umbrella title Alone, is striking. Amir’s use of color and space speak volumes, in terms of his storytelling. He has even introduced well known superheroes to his work by capitalizing on existing narrative to reinforce his theme. And it works brilliantly. Well done. Prints available here.

Via a-bel.com

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Though relatively new on the scene of traditional film photography, German photographer Florian Imgrund creates masterful compositions the old school way. Imgrund got his first film camera just four years ago, and has been building an impressive body of work ever since. Employing double exposure techniques in the darkroom, Imgrund often merges beautiful landscapes with human forms… all without any computer manipulation. The results are incredible. Reminiscent of some other double exposure work here.

Via inthoughts.de

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There’s no doubt that in our image-obsessed culture particular iconic brands still have a certain cachet to inspire art. And that is, at least in part, a good indicator that they are iconic. These portraits by German-based illustrator/Designer Andy Gellenberg are a perfect example. Gellenberg painstakingly created these portraits in the likeness of a few sports icons, LeBron, Tiger and P-Rod, entirely out of the ubiquitous Nike swoosh. His sense of color and tone really shines here, using such a specific form to create a larger, very recognizable image. Pretty amazing.

Via Behance

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BARBRAIN

At the risk of sounding totally geeky, there’s nothing quite like a really well executed corporate identity. No matter the industry, effective branding design gets us excited. This example, by German-based designer Luca Fontana, of a logo and identity for a plant nursery in Italy is a perfect specimen of a very thoughtfully conceived and flawlessly executed package. From Fontana’s choice of color and fonts, to his embrace of the circle as a foundation for his forms, we can’t say enough about our admiration of this work.

Other examples of brilliant branding here and here and here.

Via Behance

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There’s something to be said for visually arresting advertising… when few or no words are necessary. And it’s ironic that this series promoting, of all things, Scrabble, uses barely any words at all. Yet we immediately get what is being conveyed. Russian/Ukrainian creative agency Twiga developed these terrific ads that could probably stand on their own as surrealist prints. They really are superb examples of Photoshop mastery. We’d love to see more… the possibilities are endless. Loosely reminiscent of this campaign.

Via adsoftheworld.com

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Pen-guin

 

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Cat-erpillar

 

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Crow-bar

 

Scrabble-4

Car-rot

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