Archives for category: Design

Pumpkin carving can really be an art. It seems that over the past few years, the bar has been raised. The traditional jack-o’-lantern has given way to intricate masterpieces. RISE of the Jack O’Lanterns is a consortium of expert carvers who join efforts to put on incredible displays of over 5,000 hand-carved illuminated jack-o’-lantern in New York and Los Angeles around this time each year. These gorgeous gourds feature carvings that depict everything from deceased celebrities to dinosaurs, video games to venomous snakes, fictional characters to fantastic “underwater” displays. Some take a few minutes, others take up to 20 hours, and, as magical as it all looks, they have not figured a way to keep the pumpkins from rotting… they replace them weekly as needed. Wow!

Via therise.org

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We may have a subconscious fixation with design in Italy… unintentionally our second such post in a row. This time, we look at some imaginative work of Italian art director Matteo Pozzi. Though these are advertisements for the baby product company Cam, they could easily stand on their own as examples of surrealist design. Cam’s mission is, in part, “To look at the world through children’s eyes to understand exactly what they need… only those who know how to look at the world from a child’s point of view can find the solutions to make this world more enjoyable and, above all, safer.” For this campaign, Pozzi and team answer fanciful questions that children ask, employing a surreal visual narrative that is completely engaging. Though these pieces certainly have the potential to be a hodgepodge of gratuitous Photoshop effects, the execution of these concepts in the hands of Pozzi and his team feels organic and looks flawless.

More surreal design here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Finding new ways to market familiar products is a daily challenge for advertisers. Italian ad agency Armando Testa Group’s work for Italian brewing company Birra Moretti caught our eye for their particularly inventive campaign. Great advertising transcends language and, at times, culture… it is relatable on a universal level. The juxtaposition here of particular meals with beer as the centerpiece is really smart. And certainly relatable to the masses. This series resonates with us, not only on a consumer level, but it is conceptually brilliant, and very well executed. Bravo!

Via armandotesta.it

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Australian artist Guy Whitby, otherwise known as WorkByKnight (or WBK) has a terrific eye for mosaic compositions, which (and we know from experience) is much more difficult and time consuming than it looks. These pixelated portraits are deceivingly complex, and serve as visual commentary for the global shift from analog to digital. Each piece is made up of a variety of computer keys, along with analog and digital buttons. WBK meticulously places each button and key to serve as a pixel, if you will. Though subjects vary, from celebrities and artists to musicians and political figures, to his most recent “Old School Tech” series of still life technological treasures, the quality of this remarkable work never falters. Truly amazing how strategic color choice and placement make otherwise analogous objects and shapes into something cohesive, and more importantly, recognizable.

More mosaic posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Australian-born, Boston-based designer Dan Fleming has a very keen sense of typography and form. In this series, Word Animals, Flemming pushes the boundaries of letterforms to achieve illustrative representations of animals using the letters in their names. Some certainly work better than others, but we love the series as a whole. Licensing the designs to a kids’ clothing company wouldn’t be a bad idea… seems like the perfect audience for these fun, thoughtful designs. Vaguely reminiscent of another set of animal illustrations (here).

Via danflemingdesign.com

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Digital three-dimensional renderings have come a long way. So far, in fact, that it’s often difficult to tell if something is real or rendered. South Korean digital artist/sculptor Kyuin Shim capitalizes on that obscured distinction in his digital sculptures. Focusing on dysmorphic views of the human body, Shim creates these fascinating, and in some ways, disconcerting human forms. There’s a paradox at play here… a certain beauty, yet depravity in the way Shim morphs these figures in unexpected ways.

Via Behance

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London-based mixed media artist Nick Gentry, like many other creative individuals, creates artwork partly as a means to disseminate some sort of commentary. Gentry’s work is not only visually stunning, but also touches on the evolution of “consumerism, technology, identity and cyberculture in society, with a distinctive focus on obsolete media.” Gentry recycles such outdated media, like floppy disks and film negatives, and transforms them into arresting mosaics with layers of detail and nuance. And the details are not only aesthetic, but also in the media themselves, which once seemingly held a level of importance to their owners…  Gentry’s work could be seen as a mode of preservation, if you will. And he even engages viewers in his innovative “social” art by soliciting donations of otherwise discarded media. Brilliant.

Books available here.

Via nickgentry.com

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Not only is recent graduate Sean Loose a stellar illustrator, he also has a rather distinctive style. Loose graduated from Savannah College of Art and Design in illustration and design, and takes with him an impressive body of work for such a newbie. We love his flair for geometric mod design… it doesn’t feel self-indulgent, and works particularly well in his Lucas Theatre series. We look forward to him breaking loose in the design world and making his mark.

Via looseillustration.com and Behance

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Part photojournalism, part fine art photography, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s “Aerial Views Adria” project plays to a variety of senses. These extraordinary photographs not only satisfy our own desire for visual symmetry and orderliness, they also feature a pleasing spectrum of colors. Perhaps the most amazing thing about this series is that it’s not Photoshopped. Lang captured authentic aerial views of seaside resorts at the Adriatic coastline in Italy, between Ravenna and Rimini. Be sure to check out his body of work, it’s really quite something.

Via bernhardlang.de and Behance

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For Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata it’s not enough to be a wonderful painter, he is also a incredible sculptor. And Ohata creates brilliant works of art by marrying the two. This technique, of having a sculpture virtually leaping from a painting, is not extraneously employed by Ohata. He is a masterful storyteller, and the use of three-demensionality only advances his visual narrative. With childhood and innocence as a common theme, Ohata’s work is almost cinematic in style and execution. It’s like nothing we’ve ever seen… but we can’t get enough of it!

Via yukari-art.jp and Facebook

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