Archives for the month of: May, 2012

At quick glance these look like sketches. But Spanish photographer Pep Ventosa actually merges dozens of photos to transform our awareness of these highly familiar tourist locations, in what he calls “a celebration of our collective memory.” Nominated for the Photography Masters Cup in the International Color Awards, images in this series have an almost dream-like quality, rich with details and hazy layers. Ventosa himself says: “What grows is a unique new narrative space that never actually happened, where the whole has traveled mysteriously further than what the camera documented. Part memory, part imagination. Not unlike the way we see.”

Via pepventosa.com

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Portland artist Jo Hamilton makes a fine art out of crocheting with these crazy elaborate portraits using layers of just yarn in a wide variety of colors. Be sure to check out the short stop-motion video. Pretty awesome

Via johamiltonart.com

Texas-based artist Matthew Cusick creates these incredible collages using cutout maps. The level of nuance in these intricate designs is really something to behold… they almost look like paintings or drawings from afar. Cusick explains what drew him to maps as a medium: “Maps have all the properties of a brushstroke: nuance, density, line, movement, and color…. [And] since each map fragment is an index of a specific place and time, I could combine fragments from different maps and construct geographical timelines within my paintings.”

Via mattcusick.com

Australian illustrator Ben Brown clearly has an obsession with skulls and bones. So this compelling series, Die Young, should come as no surprise to those who know his work. It’s certainly part morbidly ironic, but also an eternal salute to these high-profile celebrities who suffered untimely deaths. As Brown puts it… “the celebrity lifestyle that we seem to aspire to, had killed them all by the age of 27?” His bold illustrative style is really striking, and the macabre subject matter makes all the more intriguing.

Via benbrown.com.au

Nancy Fouts is an American-born artist living in London, and she creates this smart and witty paradoxical art. She says about her work: “It’s not deep, but it is entertaining and it makes people smile!” Indeed it does… enjoy!

Via nancyfouts.com

Highly regarded Minneapolis design firm Charles S. Anderson Design Company has a vast body of work, and their development of the Turner Classic Movies identity caught our eye. The modular structure is brilliant: “The TCM logotype we developed was brought to life with a series of 30 simple character icons, each representing a different movie category. Television is not a static medium, so we created an identity that could change and evolve, utilizing a different icon each time it appeared on screen.” The vintage commercial art style is actually refreshing in a medium filled with slick, glossy logos. Really well done!

Via csadesign.com

Ukraine designer Alex Volkov has a knack for illustrating highly effective icons/teasers. This travel set is ridiculously stunning. Makes me sort of envious….

Via kadasarva.com

Since the Spitak Earthquake in 1988, The Fund for Armenian Relief has implemented more than 225 relief, social, educational and cultural projects valued at over $290 million. Barbour Design Inc recently designed the FAR 2011 Annual Report. We are grateful to be able to contribute to such a good cause. For more info on FAR please visit: www.FARUSA.org

Since reading about Texas-based Mondo in the New York Times late last year, we’ve been really taken with their work. This offshoot of theater chain Alamo Drafthouse commissions artists to design alternate versions of movie posters. Quite fittingly, they recently released a series of posters tied into and coinciding with Marvel’s blockbuster The Avengers. They are all brilliant, particularly the glow in the dark edition of Thor.

Via mondoarchive.com

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