Archives for the month of: August, 2012

We’re all familiar with the “Keep Calm” series that seems to be everywhere lately. Super talented Mexican designer/typographer Alan Guzman tackles his own version from a designer’s perspective. Looks great, love the flourish-y hand lettering, and the pens are a nice touch. Not sure how/where to purchase the shirt, but I want one, please! Be sure to check out some of Guzman’s other work too.

Via Behance

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Our own Francisco Hernandez laid out these stories in the latest issue of Hash Magazine!

Rochesterians are abuzz over one of the latest murals in their local “Wall Therapy” project. Described as “community-level intervention in the form of mural art in the public space”, the project brings world-renowned artists to Rochester to bring new life to public spaces in the form of murals. One of the latest pieces, two bears in the St. Paul neighborhood by Belgium graffiti artist Roa, has been polarizing. Some feel it’s plain inappropriate, while others appreciate the artistic merit of the large-scale piece. We in the Barbour Rochester office will have to see it in person before we weigh in, but art is meant to be thought-provoking, so it’s certainly effective on that level. Check out more of Roa’s wonderful work here.

Via streetartnews.net and 13wham.com

Madrid design firm Patten has a very interesting style… part whimsical, part uptown. We particularly love some of their illustration work, especially these city prints.

Via studiopatten.com

Michigan portraitist Eric Daigh creates these impressive mosaic portraits with pushpins. I’m sure these photos don’t even do them justice (his piece for The Armory Show remains the largest pushpin mosaic in the world), but still striking nonetheless. It’s like digital images created by hand, each made up of just five different colors. Strategically placing tens of thousands of pushpins on a grid is no small task, and Daigh does it masterfully. One word: awesome.

Via daigh.com

Granting a classic font superpowers seems like a tall order, but French design student René Mambembé has done just that. Drawing inspiration from major comic book and movie characters (as well as a few unexpected ones), Mambembé dresses Helvetica letterforms in capes, masks and the like, to assemble this imaginative series. An original take on ever-present superhero art. Mambembé should seriously consider making a children’s book out of these!

Via Behance

With the 2012 Summer Olympics coming to a close this weekend, we thought it fitting to dig up some Olympics-inspired art. We love Texas photographer Cody Hamilton’s take on the Olympic rings, as well as “Liquidated Olympic Rings” print by street artist Zevs (pronounced “Zeus”). Then there’s this fantastic 60s inspired print by German illustrator Dieter Braun (available for purchase here). Swedish designer Viktor Hertz designed this brilliant London 2012 poster (perhaps our favorite) that makes great use of the Olympic rings. Farewell, summer games. See you in Rio in 2016….

Australian illustrator/designer/typographer Luke Lucas has some serious typography chops. We first saw one of his great illustrations in The New York Times last year. And have come across his work a few times since then. While there’s a common aesthetic in his work (I wouldn’t say his style is subtle by any means), it’s often surprising and certainly dynamic. Love his business card too

Via lukelucas.com

Potato prints are not just for school-age children anymore. UK designer Ben Brears made great use of this simple process for a festival identity, with great results. The lighthearted nature of the technique is very fitting for family oriented festival atmosphere, and the bold forms lend themselves to a variety of executions.

Via brears.co.uk

Alphabet posters can be a dime a dozen. But this bold silk screened series, by UK firm Yeah No Yeah (YNY), is special. These would look great on our walls!

Via yeahnoyeah.co.uk

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