Archives for the month of: April, 2013

Those fellow designers out there who have studied typography will appreciate this poster series. We’ve all had that assignment early on where we had to use typography as image, to compose a larger image. This series entitled Day Against Homophobia, by Italian design firm studio FM, takes that rookie exercise to a whole new level. These beautifully composed and well thought-out posters are truly inspiring. But it doesn’t take a type geek to appreciate them, they are outstanding by any measure.

Via studiofmmilano.it

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In this compelling photographic series and companion book, Vertical Horizon, French photographer/artist Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze utilizes a vantage point we often take for granted. Look straight up in any metropolis and you too can see what he sees through his lens. But what Jacquet-Lagrèze does here serves as a narrative for the city he now calls home: Hong Kong. In his own words, “Vertical Horizon is a photographic journey between the buildings of a relentlessly growing city. It is a deep immersion into the city’s thick atmospheres and a visual record of its wildly diverse built environment.”

Via rjl-art.com

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The 2011-2012 school year was a tremendous one for Stony Brook University Athletics — having produced conference champions, scholars, an NCAA national title and an Olympian. To mark such a momentous year, Barbour worked with Stony Brook to create an annual report that highlighted these significant achievements. Our approach was to build image-driven layouts with photography from various sources, and pair that imagery with impeccable typography.

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Italian paper artist Andrea Russo produces some really unique and innovative origami. His work is not quite the traditional origami that comes to mind, but rather abstract forms of repeated geometric patterns of straight lines and sometimes even curves. His passion for this art form is clear, and his proficiency speaks for itself. We are truly mesmerized by his stunning body of work.

Via Flickr

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Italian designer/illustrator Alessandro Pautasso’s graphical interpretation of old Hollywood icons is really stunning. His use of bold colors and geometric shapes (not quite as orderly as the geometric work of Charis Tsevis), is the perfect combination to deem these masterpieces in their own right. Pautasso’s amazing talents by way of Photoshop and Illustrator on Wacom hardware is truly inspiring. Nice work

Via nosurprises.it

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With spring now in bloom, we are reminded of the bounty of fruits the warmer weather brings. What better way to start a Monday than with this vibrant series of prints by New York City-based designer Chris Dina. We have a certain fondness for series (and fruit!), so these pieces, complete with compelling shapes and colors, and fine typography are certainly worth sharing. Be sure to check out some of Dina’s other work, notably his work on wayfinding and informational signage at iconic Radio City Music Hall.

Via Behance

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Young UK designer Jeffrey Huynh may be wise beyond his years. In his own words, Huynh says “the best ideas are sometimes also the simplest.” And he couldn’t be more right. In an age of fancy computer-generated work, Huynh bucked that trend with this piece for Wallpaper Magazine. His handmade 3D typography looks terrific, and reminds us that there is a certain satisfaction with hand work.

Via jeffreyhuynh.co.uk

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Dubai-based Brazilian designer Leo Rosa Borges designed these excellent tennis posters for Nike a few years back. Though they ended up not running because the featured tennis stars did not attend the tournament, they live on online as design inspiration for others. These are really effective… we love the how the typography is integrated into the photos. Great work.

Via Behance

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It’s widely known that we love Legos. Such a pure, highly creative toy for all ages. And we really appreciate when people find new ways to express themselves through these brilliant little bricks (here and here and here). This amazing Lego DSLR by Taiwanese Lego enthusiast known simply as RGB900 is no exception. The details are awesome: lens made from rubber Lego tires (complete with red ring found on some Canon lenses), hot shoe mount complete with removable flash, and flexible strap, presumably built using Lego tank tread parts. One word: wow!

Via Flickr and brickshelf.com

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Michigan artist James Kuhn is clearly more comfortable with face paint on than off. Kuhn describes himself as “an artist, retired drag queen, whiteface clown, former nudist, born again Christian, average 46 year old guy…well maybe not exactly average!” All joking aside, his painting is incredible, like nothing we’ve ever seen. His truly imaginative creations really push the boundaries of face painting. Kuhn describes his philosophy: “Art should never be a product. It should be a gift of love and a prayer. Art is silly, and fun, and can be powerful and sacred. I do show in galleries, but selling should never be your motivation for creating art.” Silly and fun, indeed. This guy must be a blast on Halloween! Check out some of his creations brought to life here.

Via Flickr

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