Archives for the month of: April, 2013

UK promotional/gift products company Hundred Million has hit the nail on the head with one particular niche product (catering to design geeks like ourselves, of course): CMYK Playing Cards. It’s actually a wonder that no one has developed these before, but from what we can see, Hundred Million did a bang up job translating traditional playing cards to something every designer could appreciate and love. In their own words, Hundred Million says: “Brilliantly stripping away all the heritage and history of good playing card design, we’ve removed everything we could, the suits have been swapped for the printer’s choice of ink: Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black, and the design on the back created from the kind of utilitarian registration marks and checks usually never seen by the public.”

Via hundredmillion.co.uk

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OCD, Original Champions of Design, in New York (Bobby Martin jr. and Jennifer Kinon) have created a fresh new identity for the WNBA. They’ve retained some of the old WNBA flavor but altered the fundamental look in terms of color (happy orange) and typography. The WNBA’s summer basketball season has for too long played second team to the male NBA. This rebrand may help raise visibility and deserved interest too. (Posted on the Daily Heller 4.10.13)0_WNBA_Before_After-1024x817  2_WNBA_LOGO_ORANGE 4_WNBA_WORDMARK_ORANGE 7_WNBA_PhotoBall 16_WNBA_SCARF_3 18_WNBA_SCARF_2

Menu design is often not recognized as much as it should be… truly under appreciated. Sure, there are plenty of pedestrian menu designs out there, but we sometimes encounter some great ones that make a lasting impression. Young, Grand Rapids, MI-based designer Scott Schermer designed this fantastic menu for Founders Brewing Co. (which, for some crazy reason, has not been implemented). We love the hand crafted feel and well-conceived hierarchy. And be sure to check out more of Schermer’s work… clearly very talented.

Via sschermer.com

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Developed by Munich ad agency Serviceplan Group, this series of ads for Faber-Castell, known for its pencils, pens and other art supplies, is simple and effective. The concept is to show how true-to-life and authentic their colored pencils are. And we must say, they are executed beautifully. When an ad/campaign can stand on its own like these, we’d give it a thumbs up. We’d hang them on our walls. Love them

Via serviceplan.com

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Malaysian artist/illustrator/designer Tang Yau Hoong’s playful style really lends itself to this series of illustrations. Hoong pairs his often whimsical illustrations with famous quotes, and the results are excellent. We particularly like the Steve Jobs print… clever.

Via tangyauhoong.com

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The exceptional work by Hungarian designer Miklós Kiss is proof that good typography transcends culture. This typographical eye candy by Kiss is all part of the identity and interior design of Budapest club/bar/restaurant Trafiq. These flawless typographical treatments could easily stand on their own, but imagine being inundated by such beautifully executed and playful exercises in typography as part of an interior design? We are in awe. A Barbour business lunch in Budapest may be in order!

Via Behance

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Just an update on a favorite post from a while back…. North Carolina-based designer Brent Holloman decided to create a new silhouette of his daughter Vie for the first year of her life. With only four weeks left of this inspiring project, thought we’d share Holloman’s progress. What a great tribute to his daughter, both professionally and personally. Be sure to check out process photos on Holloman’s blog… some of these pieces are physical works, and these shots don’t do the level of creativity and ingenuity Holloman employs much justice. This dude is on top of his game, for sure.

Via brentholloman.com

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This is some superhero art like we’ve never seen. Macedonia-based designer/illustrator/artist Marko Manev’s black and white depictions of select superheros really capture something special. While we’ve all seen appropriately colorful superhero portrayals, this series explores a darker side, and with phenomenal results. We really love his style, which is a refreshing departure from typical fan art. Iconic scenes in this stirring series feature Batman, Hulk, Captain America, Spider-Man, Silver Surfer, Thor, Iron Man, Superman, Dr. Manhattan, and Wolverine. If you’re interested in purchasing prints, Manev seems to be selling limited edition prints every so often (they sell out quick!).

Via markomanev.com and Facebook

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Midwestern filmmakers Faythe Levine and Sam Macon recently released a trailer for their documentary “Sign Painters”, which explores the lost art of sign painting, and features young and old sign painters from across the country. This 3+ year project, which also has a companion book (available here), looks like a fascinating commentary about these amazing graphic artists who have had their trade overrun by technology: “There was a time, as recently as the 1980s, when storefronts, murals, banners, barn signs, billboards, and even street signs were all hand-lettered with brush and paint. But, like many skilled trades, the sign industry has been overrun by the techno-fueled promise of quicker and cheaper. The resulting proliferation of computer-designed, die-cut vinyl lettering and inkjet printers has ushered a creeping sameness into our landscape. Fortunately, there is a growing trend to seek out traditional sign painters and a renaissance in the trade.”

Via signpaintermovie.com

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Finnish installation artist Kaarina Kaikkonen creates art using, of all things, second-hand clothing. Her impressive large-scale installations explore symmetry and color in some really interesting ways. Her latest work, Are We Still Going On?, involves hundreds of children’s shirts hung in rows, meant to resemble the interior framework of a giant ship.

Via atpdiary.com and artinfo.com and sculptors.fi

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