Archives for the month of: August, 2013

We do have a certain fondness for food photography (here, here and here), so when we come across something special, we have to share. Allan Peters, Minneapolis-based in-house senior art director for Target, was at the helm of this superb “Food for Thought” series aimed at increasing awareness about grocery products in Canadian Target outlets. Illustrator/letterer Danielle Evans did an amazing job getting her hands dirty and bringing the concept to life (in both English and French!). Well done.

Via allanpeters.com and marmaladebleue.com

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UK design studio Design By House took a rather unique approach when illustrating a series of landmarks, aptly titled “Landmarques”, from around the globe. Rather than resorting to the standard solid silhouette, DBH utilized a variety of layered shapes and colors to create a really effective and interesting take on each landmark. It’s amazing how even a suggestion of the form of such iconic structures immediately identifies them. We also love their choice of colors.

Via designbyhouse.com

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Though these photos probably don’t do them justice, British contemporary artist Joe Black’s large-scale compositions are stunning. Composed of thousands of small objects, such as Lego bricks, ball bearings, plastic toy soldiers, buttons and badges, these pieces are not simply visually stimulating, but also thought provoking. The Captain America likeness of Black’s piece titled “Carry Your Own Sins Missy” is composed of 1,478 handmade badges of collected imagery, from Elvis and Disney cartoons to the Vietnam War. In his own words, “The iconic image of Captain America encapsulates the idea of America as the hero nation. However, within the image we glimpse the conflicts and contradictions of the all-American dream.” Similarly, the Superman likeness is made up of 1,389 badges of Western cultural imagery interspersed with corporate logos, fast food and obesity. Black has an incredible eye for tonal composition. We only wish we could see these in person… spectacular work.

Via mrjoeblack.com

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Israeli-born, London-based graphic designer Noma Bar has a very specific style. Use of negative space may look simple or straightforward to most, but as any designer will tell you, to employ it really effectively is no easy task. And negative space is the cornerstone of Bar’s style, which is really saying something. Perhaps one of the best examples of Bar’s masterful work is an IBM campaign from a few years back, which is sure to be studied by designers for many decades to come. In his own words, Bar’s general philosophy is “maximum communication with minimum elements.” And IBM clearly (and smartly) tapped Bar for its Smarter Planet campaign for that very reason.

Via dutchuncleagency.blogspot.com

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Local (as in Rochester, NY) artist Andy Gilmore creates mesmerizingly hypnotic geometric compositions. These are not pedestrian takes on kaleidoscopic views, but truly unique works of art. As revealed in the following (terrific) short video, Gilmore’s often complex pieces are inspired by the world around him, especially patterns in nature. His remarkable work has garnered international attention, partly due to his collaboration with Ghostly International. Gilmore’s impressive client roster includes Wired Magazine, The New York Times, Fast Company, Wallpaper* Magazine, Nike, among others. Keep him on your radar, we predict we’ll be seeing a lot more of his work proliferate through popular culture in the future.

Via crowquills.com and theghostlystore.com

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London-based illustrator/designer Federica Bonfanti designed this bucket list, of sorts, of places to visit before you die (complete with checklist to keep score). What catches our eye here is just how well rounded this piece is. The level of detail Bonfanti achieves in each “badge” is really something. Her keen eye for typography is spot-on, capturing some personality of each city. Each “badge” can certainly stand on its own (and some are actually for sale as individual prints). And her sense of color is also notable. Great piece any way you slice it… very inspiring.

Via federicabonfanti.com

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Brooklyn-based photographer Jon Feinstein takes an unconventional approach to food photography in one of his latest projects. Rather than some sort of slick, carefully-lit setup, Feinstein has stripped his subjects from their familiar context, by scanning each (still-warm) item on a flatbed scanner. All the while, capturing a fascinating juxtaposition of the both “revolting and mouthwatering” nature of fast food. In his own words, Feinstein explains: “These photographs investigate the love/hate relationship that many Americans have with fast food, and, like many other aspects of popular culture, its ability to be simultaneously seductive and repulsive.”

Via jonfeinstein.com

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Not only are we huge fans of comedian Louie C.K., but this series of promo posters for his FX series are some of the best we’ve ever seen. Under the helm of supremely talented Los Angeles-based Turkish designer/creative director Ozan Karakoc, these posters transcend advertising… they are like individual works of art. We love the diverse layouts, and multitude of textures and typographic treatments. One is better than the other. Cue design envy music.

Via Behance

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Moving from Wisconsin to New York City could induce culture shock for some. Graphic designer Rebecca Sloat channeled such potential disorientation into a fun, witty graphic observation that “pokes fun at the many nuances that make New York what it is.” Sloat’s superb illustration skills really elevate this delightful series to the next level. Well done!

Via newyorknormal.com

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