Archives for the month of: August, 2013

Chinese sculptor Li Lihong juxtaposes contemporary corporate logos with traditional Chinese imagery and ceramic techniques, with fantastic results. The series is a sculptural mashup of corporate identity and fine art, of contemporary and traditional, of East and West, of old and new. Western business has become integrated into Chinese culture, and Lihong’s work seems to embrace it.

Via Facebook

Lihong-01 Lihong-02 Lihong-03 Lihong-04 Lihong-05 Lihong-06 Lihong-07 Lihong-08 Lihong-09 Lihong-10 Lihong-11 Lihong-12 Lihong-13

Advertisements

Whether you have a sweet tooth or not, you’ll surely appreciate this monochromatic Sugar Series by Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe. We love orderly groupings (here and here), and food, of course (here and here and here). And this is the best of both worlds. Great series.

Via thesewoods.com

Blincoe-1 Blincoe-2 Blincoe-3 Blincoe-4 Blincoe-5 Blincoe-6 Blincoe-7 Blincoe-8 Blincoe-9

We have a certain fondness for movie posters, and we love this series for its totally fresh take. Italian art director Salvatore Zanfrisco illustrates iconic sound bites from cult movies, using sound waves as the basis… “celebrating the ultimate way to enjoy cinema – by ears.”

Via Tumblr and Bahance

MovieSound-1

MovieSound-2

MovieSound-3 MovieSound-4 MovieSound-5 MovieSound-6 MovieSound-7

These are not your average hermit crab shells you’d find, say, on the boardwalk at the Jersey shore. Japanese artist Aki Inomata created this series of intricate clear plastic cityscapes, in part, as commentary on human adaptation and migration. “The hermit crabs wearing the shelters I built for them, which imitate the architecture of various countries, appeared to be crossing various national borders. Though the body of the hermit crab is the same, according to the shell it is wearing, its appearance changes completely. It’s as if they were asking, ‘Who are you?'”

Via aki-inomata.com and art-is.com

Inomata-1 Inomata-2 Inomata-3 Inomata-4 Inomata-5 Inomata-6

Word of this amazingly tiny tome broke this week, and we are fascinated. University of Iowa librarian Colleen Theisen recently stumbled upon the microscopic book, measuring just 0.138 inches square and 0.04 inches thick. Luckily the library, which houses more than 4,000 miniature books in its collection, recently purchased a microscope for its conservation lab. That was certainly put to good use to inspect this book, so small that it cannot be read by the naked eye. After close examination, the book was found to have originally been part of a two-book set (partial Bibles, actually), marketed and sold at the World’s Fair in New York in 1965 by a Japanese publisher.

Photos by Colleen Theisen

Via theatlantic.com

MiniBook-1 ??????????????????????????????? MiniBook-3 MiniBook-4 MiniBook-5 MiniBook-6 MiniBook-7 MiniBook-8

Great, mind-blowing, innovative packaging is rare, and this gem is certainly in a class all its own. Canadian firm Hired Guns Creative was tasked with creating unique brands of several beers for a local craft brewery, Longwood Brewery. While the design of each beer is pretty exceptional, one really stands out. HGC not only named Stoutnik, a Russian Imperial Stout (“It seemed a fitting choice for a beer as dark as space itself”), they chose a striking black matte exterior (including the bottle itself!). We love the prismatic foil stamp and blind emboss Morse code (which tells a story about the beer… brilliant!). If and when we find this, we surely will never recycle the bottles… this packaging is art.

Via hiredgunscreative.com

HGC-1 HGC-2 HGC-3 HGC-4 HGC-5

What often sets an illustrator apart is style. And skill varies, of course. London-based illustrator/designer Alexis Marcou has the total package, so to speak. The level of detail and realism he achieves is quite remarkable, but his style is also extraordinary. In this self-initiated series spanning more than two years, Marcou captures something really special in four (very different) iconic musical artists. In his own words, “The biggest challenge in technical terms was to preserve the same style throughout even though the four main artists presented here are very different to one another. The whole idea behind this project was to create a style bold enough to fit any music artist without distorting his/her identity.” Seriously enviable work here, folks.

Via alexismarcou.com

Marcou-01 Marcou-02 Marcou-03 Marcou-04 Marcou-05 Marcou-06 Marcou-07 Marcou-08 Marcou-09 Marcou-10 Marcou-11 Marcou-12 Marcou-13 Marcou-14 Marcou-15 Marcou-16 Marcou-17 Marcou-18

Croatian multidisciplinary designer Vladimir Koncar has a fondness for experimental typography, as shown in his terrific typography project called Diary Type. “Diary Type is a kind of personal typographic diary that started as a experiment in 2007. I collect various objects and from them I form the letters. With those letters I write my thoughts down and they are a symbolic link between the font and the reflections.” We particularly love the seemingly random choice of materials.

Via koncar.info

Koncar-01 Koncar-02 Koncar-03 Koncar-04 Koncar-05 Koncar-06 Koncar-07 Koncar-08 Koncar-09 Koncar-10 Koncar-11 Koncar-12 Koncar-13 Koncar-14

Okay, so maybe we’re late to the party, but this mashup of rappers and cereal is one of our favorite Tumblr finds in a while. Tampa-based freelance art director/designer Brittany Meronek maintains this fantastic blog. Check out some of our favorites below. And be sure to check the blog often for new posts. You may even see a contribution from Barbour one day….

Via rappersandcereal.com and brittanymeronek.com

Rappers+Cereal-01 Rappers+Cereal-02 Rappers+Cereal-03 Rappers+Cereal-04 Rappers+Cereal-05 Rappers+Cereal-06 Rappers+Cereal-07 Rappers+Cereal-08 Rappers+Cereal-09 Rappers+Cereal-10 Rappers+Cereal-11

%d bloggers like this: