Archives for the month of: November, 2014

There are many little pleasures in life, and for us, two of those are sweets and typography (in no particular order). So when we stumbled upon this delicious work by Brazilian art director Ivan Loos, our day got a little brighter. Commissioned by Latin American commercial baking giant Bimbo for its Ana Maria brand, these custom typefaces were developed to appeal to a younger demographic by mimicking filling flavors (chocolate, vanilla and strawberry) for their cakes. Loos’s 3D work is flawless. We love that the characters are not perfect, but reflect the true mass and movement of these decadent delights. Clever name, too! Great work all around.

Via Behance

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There’s an old adage that states “less is more.” And that maxim certainly holds true for this minimalist icon set developed for Schick. There was a notion in the Philippines that Schick was a female brand because of their popular line of lady razors, so the Manila branch of marketing and advertising giant J. Walter Thompson developed this slick set of graphic posters to combat that misperception. These fantastically bold graphics, by the team at JWT Manila, feature recognizable historical and pop culture figures with distinct facial hair (Mr. T from The A-Team, V from V for Vendetta, Salvador Dali, Groucho Marx and Charlie Chaplin) that one can achieve using Schick razors. We love how the product is seamlessly integrated into the designs. There’s certainly market research and number crunching that goes into how and where to market with visuals like these, but we don’t see why a campaign like this wouldn’t be effective here in the US. There seems to be a sort of facial hair renaissance happening right now, and aggressively bold visuals like these would be hard to miss.

Via jwt.com

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It seems as if we are currently in the golden age of superheroes, at least if the release of major motion pictures is a gauge. These characters seem so pervasive in popular culture today, not just in the US but worldwide, that inspired works of art are almost inevitable. French photographer Sacha Goldberger really raises the bar with his phenomenal series Super Flemish. Goldberger uses not only superheroes, but also science-fiction and a few other characters from popular fantasies, and poses some intriguing questions: What if Superman was born in the sixteenth century? What if the Hulk was a Duke? How might Van Eyck have portrayed Snow White? And he answers them beautifully in this mashup of modern day superheroes, Flemish painting techniques and Elizabethan-era fashion. These works are really quite exquisite, and certainly thought-provoking. Well done, Mr. Goldberger!

This series is slightly reminiscent of work by British artist Steve Payne. More superhero related posts here and here and here.

Via sachabada.com

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What the…!? The unbelievable work of UK designer/illustrator Chris LaBrooy (previously featured here) elicits confusion, amazement and delight all at the same time. LaBrooy’s tremendously realistic (yet highly unlikely) 3D creations are nothing short of spectacular. We are particularly taken with his automobile works, which appropriately feature the words “aerobics” and “elasticity” in their titles… words obviously not associated with rigid metal motor vehicles, but perfectly normal in this twisted alter universe. LaBrooy takes digital manipulation to a whole other level, bending and stretching familiar objects with such precision. We absolutely love what LaBrooy is doing, and look forward to his future work.

Via chrislabrooy.com

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We are the first to admit that snakes in the wild and snakes in a controlled setting like a zoo, or through the lens of a talented photographer are two entirely different experiences. We certainly don’t love snakes in the way some people have them as pets. But we do recognize their undeniable beauty and mystique, especially when Italian photographer Guido Mocafico is involved. For his book Serpens, published several years ago, Mocafico captured a variety of snakes, including vipers and cobras, in these stunning photos. We have always found the vivid colors, remarkable patterns and graceful movements of these creatures beautiful and creatively inspiring. Mocafico shares a similar sentiment: “I have always been terrified by these reptiles, but I also find them terribly fascinating. I felt a sort of repulsion-attraction for these living creatures…. If I had to define beauty, I’d say it has to contain an element of darkness or danger.”

Via guidomocafico.com and hamiltonsgallery.com

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There’s a lot of buzz surrounding the new Christopher Nolan science-fiction film Interstellar. Given the genre, and anticipation leading up to its release last week, it’s no surprise that a considerable amount of inspired art has surfaced online. Much of it is fan art, but these poster comps by Los Angeles-based designer/art director James Fletcher are more than that. Certainly a fan, but also an entertainment industry insider, Fletcher has loads of experience working in the field. And it shows. We love the variety of his layouts, and the level of detail he brings to the table. There’s nothing static about them… they could be part of the movie itself. These posters are impactful, engaging, and just darn good. Well done. Be sure to check out more of Fletcher’s stellar work.

Via dreamstateconcepts.com and Behance

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Relying on forms of matter (say liquids and fine solids like powder) in photography can be a very tricky proposition. So much could go wrong. But for London-based photographer Iain Crawford such carefully planned orchestrations result in some incredible photography. Crawford has a very adventurous spirit when it comes to his photography work. He is always looking to push boundaries by finding new ways of doing things. His images embody a beautiful (and unpredictable) kinetic energy that seems almost impossible to capture without digital facilitation of Photoshop. Crawford on his work with paint, in his own words: “I love the fusion between paint and model. The resulting shapes are as opulent as any piece of bespoke couture. The excitement and anticipation as we waited to see the next piece of unpredictable chaos was electric. There was something magical about how random chance materialized into beautiful images in front of our eyes.”

Via iaincrawford.com

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You may remember Bryan Adams from the “Summer of ’69”, but this Canadian-born rock star has some impressive photography chops too. Adams, whose family has a rich military history, photographed 40 severely injured British vets who served in Iraq and Afghanistan for this arresting and enlightening project. This series of intimate, and sometimes unsettling, portraits taken over the course of four years, documents the heroism and plight of wounded veterans, and was released as a book last year, titled Wounded: The Legacy of War. We can’t say enough about Adams’ remarkable photographs… he tells a story of human sacrifice and captures a vulnerability that we don’t often see with military personnel. An exhibition of these works starts today and runs through late January in London.

Via bryanadamsphotography.com

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We are suckers for experimental typography, especially when it’s served up as a nice tidy alphabet. This outstanding series by Madrid-based designer Alejandro “Alex” López Becerro is one such example. Becerro is crazy talented, and his 3D work is on the mark. We love the variety that’s showcased here, which seems to be key to really successful avant-garde, if you will, alphabet work. His choice of textures and colors elevate this project. And we are particularly impressed with Becerro’s ability to establish a great sense of setting through light and shadow. Be sure to check out some of his other work, he’s a master at what he does.

More alphabet posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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This is already the second time in a few months that we’ve posted about the work of Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac (previous post here). We are so taken with his work, which firmly addresses the notion that creativity and technology and science are not mutually exclusive, that we just had to share. In this series, Stardust, Albiac again explores technological processes to create generative works of art. The methodology behind this is admittedly over our heads, but the results are certainly impressive. Albiac basically uses images from the Hubble Space Telescope to compose portraits based on the concept of nucleosynthesis. He even solicited internet participation, which resulted in more than 15,000 works. In his own words, Albiac explains: “As a theme for this series of portraits, I’ve choosen the concept of nucleosynthesis or the process of creation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing matter that takes place at cosmic scale. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”

Via sergioalbiac.com

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