Archives for the month of: January, 2015

When art and science collide, some pretty spectacular things can happen. Dutch visual artist Berndnaut Smilde applies a fascination with the complexities of duality (construction vs. deconstruction, inside vs. outside, etc.) to his work. Some of his most notable pieces involve literally bringing what is otherwise an outdoor phenomenon, clouds, indoors. And this makes for some pretty strikingly unfamiliar visuals. The ephemeral nature of this work is so powerful, existing for just a short time, and constantly changing (building up and falling apart) in the process. Smilde’s combination of smoke and moisture (and dramatic lighting) is an achievement in both visual art and science, even recognized by Time Magazine as one of the “Top Ten Inventions of 2012”. Be sure to check out the video at the bottom of this post to see Smilde’s clouds in motion.

More art and science marriages here and here and here.

Via berndnaut.nl and Vimeo

Smilde-1 Smilde-2 Smilde-3 Smilde-4 Smilde-5 Smilde-6 Smilde-7 Smilde-8

Advertisements

At first glance, one might deduce that this series of vivid, eye-catching photos is for some high-brow fashion campaign, or conceptual art project. Much to our surprise and delight, they are actually part of a bold print and outdoor advertising campaign from a few years back, entitled Adaptation, for, of all things, Barcelona City Council. That’s right, government, more or less. Shot by acclaimed Spanish photographer Paco Peregrín, and art directed by London-based Conor Cronin, this campaign is so different from what we’d expect from anything remotely bureaucratic, that’s it’s certainly attention getting, and even slightly refreshing. Could you even imagine a campaign like this for your local city council? Perhaps Spaniards are more culturally and artistically evolved. Or maybe the aesthetic sophistication juxtaposed with a purpose, though noble, rather mundane, was exactly the point. Either way, we’re talking about it thousands of miles away, and that is impressive by any measure.

Via pacoperegrin.com and conorcronin.com

Adaptation-1 Adaptation-2 Adaptation-3 Adaptation-4 Adaptation-5 Adaptation-6 Adaptation-7 Adaptation-8

Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

Hunter-01 Hunter-02 Hunter-03 Hunter-04 Hunter-05 Hunter-06 Hunter-07 Hunter-08 Hunter-09 Hunter-10 Hunter-11 Hunter-12 Hunter-13 Hunter-14 Hunter-15 Hunter-16 Hunter-17 Hunter-18 Hunter-19 Hunter-20 Hunter-21 Hunter-22 Hunter-23 Hunter-24 Hunter-25 Hunter-26Hunter-27 Hunter-28 Hunter-29 Hunter-30

Barbour_Awards-Email-01.15

Most 20-somethings use social media to simply keep up with friends and publicize their weekend exploits. But young Italian artist Atena Neezy takes to Facebook and Instagram to showcase her stellar pencil portraiture. Neezy also posts time-lapse process videos on YouTube that are simply amazing. What a terrific use of social media to disseminate one’s art. The social media-minded Neezy even manages to get some of her work into the hands of her famous subjects, and posts photos. What’s notable about Neezy is not only her incredible artistic talent — achieving photo-realistic likenesses with little more than some pencil lead and her keen eye — but also her savvy approach to promoting her work. We’re actually surprised that she doesn’t have a larger following. In time, we’re sure.

Via Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

Neezy-01 Neezy-02 Neezy-03 Neezy-05 Neezy-06 Neezy-07 Neezy-08 Neezy-09 Neezy-10 Neezy-11 Neezy-12 Neezy-13 Neezy-14 Neezy-15 Neezy-16 Neezy-17 Neezy-18

It is said that patience is a virtue. And French artists/designers Xavier Casalta and Rémy Boiré are just oozing with it. Casalta’s specialty is pointillism, a technique in which small, distinct dots are applied in patterns to form an image. Boiré is a masterful hand-letterer, whose line work is impeccable. Together they created this phenomenal piece. Clocking in over 300 hours of patience and discipline, Casalta’s and Boiré’s passion for highly detailed design could not be more evident. Not only is this a great example of seamless collaboration, but also of deliberate forethought and planning, as well as hand craftsmanship in an increasingly digital design landscape. Just incredible.

Via casaltaxavier.com and remyboire.fr

Patience-01 Patience-02 Patience-03 Patience-04 Patience-05 Patience-06 Patience-07 Patience-08 Patience-09 Patience-10 Patience-11 Patience-12 Patience-13 Patience-14 Patience-15

Call us tortured designers, but being exposed to really bad menu design in an otherwise decent establishment can be slightly agonizing. A business lunch with the Barbour crew inevitably ends up being a design critique of the menu (good or bad) upon the first few minutes of being seated. Yes, it’d probably make for a good SNL skit, but in all seriousness, menu design is an important detail that is sometimes missed. That is certainly not the case for this Italian restaurant, Ristorante Firenze, located near, of all places, Frankfurt, Germany. Stuttgart-based designer Sarah Le Donne is tremendously talented, and really shows her design chops with this branding package. We particularly love the typography and adept use of color. Le Donne explains: “After a small refresh of the existing logo, the task was to create a totally new concept and design for menu and wine cards, vouchers, brochures, business cards, letterheads and a website. The idea behind the identity was to lay the focus on the fresh products the restaurant is well known for. Also the classical Italian colors are reinterpreted in a modern way.” Really well done.

More restaurant-related design here and here and here.

Via sarahledonne.com

LeDonne-01 LeDonne-02 LeDonne-03 LeDonne-04 LeDonne-05 LeDonne-06 LeDonne-07 LeDonne-08 LeDonne-09 LeDonne-10 LeDonne-11 LeDonne-12 LeDonne-13 LeDonne-14 LeDonne-15 LeDonne-16 LeDonne-17 LeDonne-18 LeDonne-19 LeDonne-20

Milan-based designer/illustrator/author Gerald Bear seems to have a bunch of questions in that tremendously creative brain of his. And he answers many visually in his ongoing series Unconventional Heroes. What if all Doc Brown could afford was a Fiat (instead of a DeLorean)? What if Michael Knight did his life’s work from a talking VW Beetle? What if the Mystery Van was a Ford Thames van? Unconventional is a great adjective to describe these fantastic illustrations by Bear. He taps into not only a love of automobiles/transportation, but also a fascination with pop culture, and of course, the art of illustration. Bear marries these altogether in a pleasantly unexpected series that keeps us wanting more. Keep ‘em coming!

Via Behance

Bear-01 Bear-02 Bear-03 Bear-04 Bear-05 Bear-06 Bear-07 Bear-08 Bear-09 Bear-10 Bear-11 Bear-12 Bear-13 Bear-14 Bear-15 Bear-16 Bear-17 Bear-18 Bear-19

We really like the commitment of promising young UK designer Thomas Wightman. Showcased here are two school projects by the recent grad. That’s right, school projects. Wightman aimed high with these tremendously conceptual sculptures, and executed them with perfection. The intricate details are truly astounding. The objective of the assignments (aptly titled The Medium is the Message) was to visually interpret a theme (Wightman chose addiction, with a focus on obsessive driven addictions) through a chosen medium. In his own words, Wightman explains the medium he selected and the meaning behind his first piece: “The book firstly is closed hiding the addiction from view in the same manner as those who hide these addictions from loved ones and friends. However when the book is opened it reveals the chaotic emotions felt. Panic attacks are heavily associated with Obsessive Compulsive disorder and I wanted to convey this through the metaphor of a sinking ship in a vortex drowning from the obsession. Also the symptoms of a panic attack include loss of breath in the same way as drowning in water. However I wanted to add the anchor and typographic rope showing these problems can be solved and the ship can be saved in the same way as those who suffer from OCD when they receive proper treatment.”

For his second book sculpture, Plagued by Doubt, Wightman delved a little deeper into the emotion associated with living with OCD. Wightman explains: “I wanted to convey this idea by making a plague of insects. I decided on moths because I wanted to suggest that the book has been hidden and left, and the moths have eaten away at the pages of the book. This shows that if you don’t seek treatment for OCD, it can become both physically and mentally damaging. Also, typography was used to show the idea that these moths have made a nest within the book – representative of the fact that OCD is usually with a person for life. It lives within and is not noticed until the book is opened, releasing the moths and solving the problem to demonstrate that with proper help, OCD can be treated.” Conceptually and aesthetically beautiful.

More book-related posts here and here and here.

Via Blogspot

Wightman-1 Wightman-2 Wightman-3 Wightman-4 Wightman-5 Wightman-6 Wightman-7 Wightman-8 Wightman-9

We are big fans of reimagined movie posters done well (here and here and here). San Francisco Bay Area-based Concepcion Studios, led by art director Patrick Concepcion, seems to do better than well with each new project. And these reimagined Wes Anderson film posters, for Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, and The Life Aquatic, are no exception. We love the the bold colors, clean and timeless typography, and vintage hipster feel employed here. Film buffs and design nerds alike should swoon over this series, as well as other work in Concepcion’s portfolio. There’s some pretty terrific work.

Via concepcionstudios.com and Etsy

Concepcion-1 Concepcion-2 Concepcion-3 Concepcion-4 Concepcion-5 Concepcion-6 Concepcion-7

%d bloggers like this: