Archives for the month of: March, 2015

Few food items are more iconic than the beloved Oreo cookie. Introduced 103 years ago tomorrow (Happy Birthday, Oreo!), this sandwich cookie has long been recognized as the best-selling cookie in the U.S. With credentials like that, it’s no surprise that the Oreo brand has a massive advertising budget that allows for some terrifically creative campaigns. Its most recent, Play with Oreo, has spawned a commission of 10 global artists (Shotopop, Jeff Soto, Ryan Todd, McBess, Andrew Bannecker, Geoff McFetridge, Andy Rementer, Alex Trochut, Craig and Karl and Brosmind) to create Oreo-themed masterpieces. Spearheaded by advertising firm The Martin Agency, these whimsical ads will be showcased outdoors in New York City, Los Angeles and Indianapolis, and across Oreo social media channels, throughout March. Makes us wanna reach for a tall glass of milk, and dunk.

Via playwithoreo.com

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If you were thinking of invading any given place, the use of balloons would not likely be involved. Unless, of course, you’re an artist with a statement to make. Such is the case with French photographer/artist Charles Pétillon and his “Invasions” series. Pétillon uses white balloons of varying sizes as a way to “change the point of view that we encounter every day without regard to it. It is our view that I try to sharpen and to move from a practical perception to visual emotion.” Pétillon essentially fills spaces, both architectural and natural, with said balloons. The resulting visuals become metaphors for various themes. The house overflowing with balloons, for example, is a metaphor for family memories that spring from home. Pétillon says, “The white balloons symbolizing childhood naivety. This metaphor allows to ask us about family memory. How is it spread? Is it a universal need?” Other pieces in this visually arresting series include “Play Station 2,” a basketball net symbolizing the video game universe, and “Mutation 2” DNA structure symbolizing genetic modification. It must have been quite a feat handling such a massive amount of balloons, and still making them look quite beautiful and surreal.

Via charlespetillon.com

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Super-realistic art has a way of making the impossible seem possible. It can be mind-bending and beautiful all at the same time. The work of French artist Daniel Firman embodies those very qualities. His series featuring balancing elephants is particularly intriguing. Firman consulted an actual taxidermist to achieve impactful authenticity. We imagine seeing one of these pieces in person would give one pause… just incredible.

More realistic artwork here and here and here.

Via danielfirman.com

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