Archives for the month of: September, 2018

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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Resemblance is a funny thing (previous post here). Like the notion that cars have faces (here). Or the dog with a human face that has taken the internet by storm (here). Sort of along those lines, British photographer (and animal lover) Gerrard Gethings recently completed a series where he paired dogs and humans, and we absolutely love it. This series is so fun, in fact, that the concept actually derived from a commission by British publisher Laurence King Publishing for this brilliant little matching game (available here). Make no mistake, this was not an easy task. According to Gethings (and he would know based on his impressive portfolio), “taking pictures of animals is tricky in almost every way. I have never met one with even the slightest interest in photography.” Fortunately, we have a strong interest in this terrific and endearing series.

Via gerrardgethings.com and Instagram

We always find it interesting when artists figuratively blur the lines of media, and in this case literally. The work of South African artist Philip Barlow appears to be one thing but is actually another, and we are utterly intrigued. What looks like beautifully composed out-of-focus photographs are actually masterfully created oil paintings. Barlow focuses (no pun intended) on the interaction of light with his subjects, and the results are quite stunning. In his own words, “The figures in the landscape serve as carriers and reflectors of the light that falls upon them. Bathed in the luminosity, it is my hope that they would become more beautiful. To me, light is the ultimate subject because it embodies the pinnacle of all reality.” In works where the details are not at all sharp, we are taken with Barlow’s astounding attention to detail. The soft edges and bokeh effect are quite beautiful, and Barlow’s deep understanding of color is an artistic revelation. We are in awe.

Via philipbarlow.com and Instagram

We can all agree that the 1980s had a very specific aesthetic that proliferated into all areas of our culture, from fashion to music to graphic design and everything in between. So when digital artist/musician/internet persona Future Punk recently took some, ahem, very recognizable brands and gave them an 80s-styled retro makeover, we swooned. Future Punk (we’ve unsuccessfully scoured the internet for any clues as to his/her true identity) employs an arsenal of 1980s mainstays, including neon, chrome and Memphis-style elements to take current brand logos back to the future. Future Punk could honestly continue this great series for quite sometime… here’s to hoping!

Via future-punk.com

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