Archives for category: Alcohol

Italian photographer Dan Bannino is a consummate storyteller with a particular penchant for still life and commercial photography. Much of his work could just as easily find a home on a gallery wall as in the pages of a mass market magazine, like National Geographic, Harper’s Bazaar, Elle, Cosmopolitan and many others. With his terrific Power and Food series, Bannino explores the eating habits of powerful and influential people from around the world. In our celebrity-obsessed culture any glimpse “behind the curtain,” so to speak, is valued. A look into the private lives of public figures, no matter how brief or inconsequential, makes us feel a little closer to them. Bannino’s series capitalizes on that curiosity, with his vibrant and arresting images. We particularly love his compositions and bold style. In his own words, Bannino states, “If you’re a fast food aficionado or a pizza freak, you have more in common with Mr. Donald J. Trump, and Pope Francis himself than you ever imagined. Check out some of the most unexpected food patterns of the world’s leaders, and you’ll never eat the same way again.”

Via danbannino.com

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When you think of 3D renderings, you immediately imagine some complex computer algorithm that miraculously adds a new dimension to something otherwise flat. With that notion in mind, the work of self-taught Serbian artist Nikola Čuljić will floor you. Not only is Čuljić an adept artist, mastering light and shadow with little more than colored pencils, markers and pastels, but he also has a computer-like mind for depth and dimension. Čuljić’s work is basically an optical illusion that confuses the viewer’s brain into thinking his drawings are somehow emerging from a flat paper surface, coming to life before one’s very eyes. Čuljić has smartly taken to social media with his unique work, racking up over 13K Facebook likes, nearly 16K Instagram followers and literally hundreds of thousands of YouTube views. Take a look for yourself… prepare to be amazed.

Via Facebook, Instagram and YouTube

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Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

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The work of Montreal-based Mathieu Lévesque is, quite simply, a masterclass in food photography. We are in awe of Lévesque’s ability to apply his own creative vision to everything he (re)touches. His attention to detail is remarkable. And the wit and whimsy present in so much of his work elevates it to the next level. We are engaged on many levels by his work… inspired, envious and hungry!

Via Behance

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While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

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Balancing work and family is an issue close to our hearts. The culture at Barbour fosters this balance brilliantly, so we listened intently when Amanda Altman of Rochester-based A3 Design took the stage at Create Upstate (see related posts here, here and here) last week. Her speech, entitled Mind My Own Business, explored the ins and outs of Altman’s experiences of not only running, but also refocusing and repositioning, a design studio with her husband, Alan. And all while juggling the demands of marriage and family. We were taken with Altman’s sincerity and candor on a subject that’s not often brought to the forefront. If her articulation was any indication, Altman could honestly have a second career as a life coach for creatives. If we had to choose a highlight, this frank pearl of wisdom pretty much sums it up: “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life… bullshit!”

Altman made a smart choice to show “pretty pictures” of A3’s outstanding body of work while speaking (scroll down for a sampling). Needless to say, the Altmans seem to be balancing masterfully. Really well done.

Via a3-design.com

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A couple members of the Barbour team had the honor of witnessing a speaking engagement by the incomparable Dana Tanamachi at Create Upstate in Syracuse last week. The event itself was terrific, from the impressive venue (great food, btw), awesome vendors, and stellar lineup of speakers. One highlight was undoubtedly the inspirational work and philosophy of Tanamachi. Honestly, we’re not saying anything new here, just bowing down, as most who are exposed to her transcendent work tend to do. Texas-bred, Brooklyn-based Tanamachi, whose lettering work is quite ubiquitous (you’ve probably seen it, or a rip-off of it, and may not have realized it was hers), seems quite gracious, humble, passionate and sincere when discussing her craft. She’s not some Brooklyn hipster who is too cool for school. Her tremendous talents seemed to have emerged over time, and her rise in the design world happened organically, which we truly admire. Tanamachi is a rock star among our peers, and we are just happy to have spent an engaging hour in her presence. Here’s a small sampling of her formidable body of work… prepare to drool.

Via tanamachistudio.com

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Packaging is no easy feat. Most people take it for granted because we are inundated with it from every angle in so many consumer categories. And coming up with fresh and original packaging concepts in the beverage industry is particularly challenging. The market is flooded with craft breweries and boutique wineries — never mind the big boys with decidedly deep pockets — that it’s sometimes difficult to tell brands apart. But Oast House Brewers located in Ontario, Canada, not far from Niagara Falls (and less than 100 miles from our Rochester studio… road trip anyone?), has some terrifically unique packaging sure to draw attention. Canadian design firm Insite was up for a good challenge, and certainly succeed with flying colors. Their truly special design fits the bill for Oast House’s Farmhouse Ales collection by housing two 750ml bottles in a distinctive red barn structure, inspired by the brewery’s rural property. This is some of our favorite packaging, surely worthy of being a collectible item.

More packaging posts here and here and here.

Via Facebook and insitedesign.ca

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Finding new ways to market familiar products is a daily challenge for advertisers. Italian ad agency Armando Testa Group’s work for Italian brewing company Birra Moretti caught our eye for their particularly inventive campaign. Great advertising transcends language and, at times, culture… it is relatable on a universal level. The juxtaposition here of particular meals with beer as the centerpiece is really smart. And certainly relatable to the masses. This series resonates with us, not only on a consumer level, but it is conceptually brilliant, and very well executed. Bravo!

Via armandotesta.it

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The folks at Brooklyn-based Pop Chart Lab have done it again. Their proficiency for infographical treatments is astounding, no matter the subject matter. Whether it be a “Visual Compendium of Guitars” or “Cartography of Kitchenware” or any number of alcohol-related compositions (think “The Marvelous Mixology of Martinis”, “Fantastical Fictive Beers”, “Wineries of Napa”, etc.), the work of Pop Chart Lab never disappoints. It’s like a master class in infographics. And they have finally given such treatment to the very core of their passion: the history of graphic design. This 18” x 24” hand-illustrated diagram (available for preorder at a limited-time discounted price here, to start shipping tomorrow) is not only a decorative piece, but also an invaluable go-to quick visual reference of the most important eras in graphic design. Pop Chart Lab’s team of researchers and designers did a fantastic job of capturing the essence of each style in such a compact, efficient manner. This will be hanging on our walls real soon.

Via popchartlab.com

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