Archives for category: Design

Conceptual food photography has got to be one of our favorite niche disciplines lately, only confirmed by this excellent collaboration between Sydney-based creatives Enrico Becker and Matt Harris. Created as visuals to accompany editorial on genetically modified foods, these photos could easily stand on their own. We love the choice of colors and thoughtful compositions. The pastel tones of the produce, along with the bar codes of course, push the work into surreal territory. And quite effectively, we might add. In his own words, Becker explains, “As shooting style, we were going for a more pastel monochromatic still-life style approach. The end result of the shoot was combined in an awesome two-spread magazine layout with a well written article about genetically modified food by Matt Harris. The idea was to create a combination between the photography and the written text.” Oh, and did we mention these guys are also students? Nice work, by any measure.


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Negative space as a design device may look simple to the average person, but it’s actually quite complicated to effectively pull off. Few present-day artists know this better than illustrator/designer/artist Tang Yau Hoong. Malaysia-based Hoong has an awesome body of work (see previous post here), a good portion of which explores the interplay of positive and negative spaces. At quick glance, Hoong’s work is simple and fun, with inviting color palettes and pleasing compositions. But upon further inspection, there’s more to them, which is always a pleasant and impressive surprise. His work is fittingly popular on Threadless, and also available for sale here.

More negative space here and here and here.


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Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”


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It’s that time of year… Halloween-inspired art comes to the forefront, and is somehow appreciated just a little bit more, given the increased interest in all things ghosts, goblins, werewolves and the like. Say what you will, but there is no less artistic merit in thoughtfully conceived, masterfully executed art, no matter the subject matter. British paper artist Marc Hagan-Guirey, also known as Paper Dandy, is like a wizard with little more than an Xacto and a single sheet of paper (yes, no glue or adhesive of any kind). He’s well-versed in the art of “kirigami”, a variation of origami that includes cutting of the paper (from Japanese “kiru” = to cut, “kami” = paper). It is also called “Kirie”. From “Kiru”= to cut, “e”= picture. Hagan-Guirey’s latest project, cleverly titled Horrorgami, draws its inspiration from classic horror films. The recently released book (available here), derived from his well-received exhibition a few years back, features “20 gruesome scenes to cut and fold”. We love the intricate details Hagan-Guirey achieves, and the expression in his work. The photos throughout the book are also notable, lit in such a way that really brings each piece to life. More paper art posts here and here and here.

Happy Halloween!


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We love an element of surprise in art, and the work of Spanish photographer García de Marina has plenty of if. In fact, much of de Marina’s work centers on the unexpected. His compositions are witty reinterpretations of everyday objects, seen through his unique lens. de Marina doesn’t just document objects, but distorts their meaning and purpose in clever and humorous ways. There’s certain accessibility to his work, that allows it to be enjoyed and understood through a visual language that transcends age and culture. Just brilliant.

Similar posts here and here and here.

Via and Facebook

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Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.


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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.


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While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via and

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Design really is all about communication and education, whether its purpose is to sell, explain, or simply draw attention. In the case of this brilliantly clever self-initiated poster, the visuals do all the work to raise awareness of an often ignored issue facing sharks in their, well, house (more about that here). A collaborative effort between Italian-born, San Francisco-based 3D master Matteo Musci, and London creative studio, Featherwax, which specializes in retouching and CGI, this striking poster does a terrific job of immediately drawing the viewer in with its arresting visuals. Inspired by an iconic movie poster, this piece’s strength is in its irony. In their own words, the duo explains: “An in-house concept to promote awareness for shark-culling, and the number of sharks killed annually. Due to the demonization of sharks, it’s often an overlooked issue. The concept here is to compare the number of deaths each species cause each other, and visually turn that fear on its head. The Jaws poster naturally springs to mind, and can be viewed as a boat full of harpoon-guns.”

Jaws related posts here and here and here

Via Behance


Original JAWS poster:


Art with purpose and for social good can be really powerful. It can bring people together in unique ways that’s really touching, especially in this digitally connected, yet ironically isolating society we live in today. The work of Germen Crew, a Mexican youth organization comprised of muralists and street artists, to literally transform a village is a prime example. The government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself resulted in this magnificent mural, Mexico’s largest. Launched as an effort to not only rehabilitate the hillside neighborhood, but to also bring the community together, the Germen Crew project was a massive undertaking involving the painting of 209 individual houses. And the photos speak for themselves. Be sure to check out the video below (in Spanish). The vibrant, fluid composition seen from afar is truly awe-inspiring and heart warming. Just amazing.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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