Archives for category: Design

Only an immensely talented illustrator could accept a challenge from a friend, and adapt his style so masterfully. This was exactly the case with Russian illustrator/designer/art director Viktor Miller-Gausa. He never really earned his stripes as a cartoonist per se, but when a friend said he could not draw a caricature, Miller-Gausa honed his skills by creating incredible portraits for 31 days of both his friends, and familiar celebrity faces. Here’s a sampling of Miller-Gausa’s awesome work.

Via Cargo Collective

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As we’ve mentioned before (here and here and here), 3D rendering has come a really long way in recent years. With technology advancing exponentially, the world of three-dimensional work has gotten more real, to the point that it’s sometimes difficult to discern what’s computer generated and what’s actually real. This gorgeous series, GoldRush, by Slovenian designer Črtomir Just exemplifies that fine line. We all know that these items aren’t actually made of gold, but Just nearly makes us believe it. In his own words, Just explains, “Since the world is obsessed with everything that’s golden, I decided to make a fun 3D series that takes the popular ‘gold’ naming for a spin and tries to depict these products literally or how they would look like, if they were truly made out of gold.”

Via Behance

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It was almost a year ago that we posted about an incredible collaboration between Russian photographer Alexander Khokhlov, makeup artist Veronica Ershova, and floral stylist Mikhail Kravchenko. They have teamed up again for a series of striking photos entitled Bloomshapes and Illusions, where they explore photographic portraiture adapted from a variety of influences, such as minimalism and symbolism. They even employ an element of illusion in their work, which makes it that much more special. Particularly notable is their use of flowers, like their remarkable Marge Simpson piece. Here, they employ brilliantly white blooms with great success. The attention to detail and sheer artistry that goes into these photographs is astounding, as exhibited in the video below. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again… can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

Via alexanderkhokhlov.com and YouTube

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The work of Foot Footie Boy is just simple fun. No, this is not high-brow art, or particularly intellectual or socially conscious. New Delhi-based aspiring artist Uttam Sinha has more than a foot fetish. He seems to see the world in a different light. Armed with nothing more than his phone and vivid imagination, Sinha adds sketches to photos of people’s feet. Okay, sounds sorta weird, even creepy, but it really is creative and fun. These simple composite works actually tell stories, and would probably make a terrific little coffee table book.

Via Facebook

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Given the somber mood surrounding all things politics and money in Europe, particularly Greece, this installation street art, fittingly titled “Crisis”, is especially relevant. Conceived and created by Madrid-based artist SpY, and installed in a central neighborhood in the city of Bilbao, the piece consists of 1000€ (almost $2,000) in 2 cent coins making up the word “CRISIS” on an outdoor wall. Not totally surprising, passersby helped themselves to the money, and all the coins disappeared in less than 24 hours. In some ways, that feels like blatant defacing of public art, but in other ways, that was likely expected and part of the point to begin with. SpY seems very much in touch with the political climate around him, and we love his out-of-the-box creativity. There’s good reason he’s been making such relevant urban art since the mid-eighties. In his own words, his work “involves the appropriation of urban elements through transformation or replication, commentary on urban reality, and the interference in its communicative codes…. a parenthesis in the automated inertia of the urban dweller. They are pinches of intention, hidden in a corner for whoever wants to let himself be surprised. Filled with equal parts of irony and positive humor, they appear to raise a smile, incite reflection, and to favor an enlightened conscience.”

Via spy-urbanart.com

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Indonesia-based artist/photographer/designer Romo Jack, otherwise known by the handle @ponypork, gives new meaning to working with one’s hands. Jack, a 20-something savvy social media maven, dreams up a variety of otherwise mundane activities, such as cooking, ironing, painting, drawing, playing music, playing sports, and even photographing, and captures them from an aerial point of view. Jack’s terrific compositions all have two things in common: his signature elaborately tattooed forearms as a subject, and a (very deliberately) Instagram-friendly square canvas. We appreciate Jack’s attention to detail and meticulous crafting of each image. We’re excited to see how this fantastic series, #whatmyhandsdoing, evolves in the future. And his ever-growing base of almost 33,000 Instagram followers undoubtedly feels the same.

Via Instagram

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Bucking tradition, and just about every rule in a marketer’s playbook, global powerhouse brand Coca-Cola has taken a bold stance on topic du jour: equality and prejudice. In observation of the month of Ramadan in the Middle East, Coca-Cola has, for the first time in its storied 129 year history, stripped its cans of its iconic script logo in an effort to demonstrate a world without labels. Aptly titled “No Labels”, the campaign is sort of a social experiment to get into the minds of people regarding labels, preconceptions and stereotypes in general. Bearing nothing but its highly recognizable “dynamic ribbon” and the message “Labels are for cans not for people”, the limited-edition cans make a bold and beautiful statement. As designers, we are drawn to the visual simplicity juxtaposed with the powerful message. It’s actually rather telling of the current corporate branding landscape at large: businesses are opting to streamline their identities by making their logos simpler and flatter. Be sure to check out Coca-Cola’s masterful commercial to accompany the socially conscious campaign.

Via coca-colacompany.com

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Given the late breaking, historical news that a NASA probe, launched some nine and a half years ago, and traveling an astounding 3 billion miles, has finally reached Pluto just hours ago, we thought it fitting to showcase this series of custom astronomy logos by Berlin-based designer Jonas Söder. We love Söder’s style here, sort of giving a nod to sci-fi graphics of the 1950s, but with a modern twist. His use of texture is quite nice, with a clear typographical prowess, as demonstrated by his custom letterforms. Out of this world, indeed.

Via Behance

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While we generally appreciate 3D rendering and the technology behind it, we must admit that extraneous use of it (which is rather rampant) is not only irritating from a conceptual standpoint, but also has a general desensitizing effect. So we were surprised and delighted to come across the work of Athens, Greece-based architect Katerina Kamprani. Her ongoing series, fittingly titled The Uncomfortable, explores the redesign of useful objects to make them uncomfortable to use. Kamprani purposefully and thoughtfully reworks each item in twisted ways. She states. “[I] decided to create and design for all the wrong reasons. Vindictive and nasty? Or a helpful study of everyday objects?” Whatever the motivation, we love staring at these, imagining how (un)useful each object would be, and the depraved humor that would ensue. We salute Kamprani for designing with purpose and humor, nicely done.

Some more stellar 3D work here and here and here.

Via kkstudio.gr

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Whatever you prefer to call it – hyper-realistic, super-realistic, photo-realistic – what’s real is the remarkable level of skill involved. We’re so taken with this type of art, we’ve featured it several times before (here and here and here and here). This time, it’s the work of Singapore-based artist Ivan Hoo. What makes his work unique is his canvas of choice… a simple board of wood. Hoo’s incredibly realistic pieces interact directly with the wood surface, creating the illusion of three-dimensionality. What’s even more impressive is that Hoo is self-taught. Armed with a few colored pencils, pastels and inks, Hoo transforms everyday objects into drawings with unbelievable results. His Starbucks cup is one of our favorites. Try not to drool too much.

Via Instagram and Tumblr

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Alright a lot have ask for different angle of the Starbucks drawing.

A video posted by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Nutella.Spill.] artwork for Mess Hall Gallery Penang ,Malaysia#wip. #pastel on wood.

A video posted by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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Working on a new drawing.✨😊#wip Full video on my Facebook page Ivan Hoo Art.

A video posted by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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[Detail.;] #BoykoKolev inspired piece..More progress on my Tumblr @ivanhooart.

A video posted by Ivan Hoo (@ivanhooart) on

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