Archives for category: Design

Photographs frequently serve as links to the past, often summoning up memories of a time that came before. Tennessee-based photographer Greg Sand capitalizes on this association, which is fundamental to his philosophy as an artist. In his own words, Sand says: “My work is about memory, the passage of time, mortality and the photograph’s role in shaping our experience of loss. Photography’s unique ability to capture a fleeting moment allows it to expose the temporality of life.” In his series entitled Remnants, Sand creates stunning works composed of three found photos from different times in the subject’s past, cut into strips and skillfully woven together to form a sort of cloth-like composite portrait. Sand says of woven cloth as a metaphor for memory: “As Peter Stallybrass writes in Worn Worlds, ‘The magic of cloth is that it receives us: receives our smells, our sweat, our shape even.’ This is one of the marvels of memory as well: we perceive each moment in our lives; these are eventually woven together to form our memory. Each piece in this series creates a likeness of an individual that–rather than depicting an accurate visual representation of that person at any given time–presents a recollected coalescence of that person’s appearances throughout his or her life.” We love the concept, and Sand’s execution is picture-perfect.

Via gregsand.net and Behance

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The worlds of fine art and digital art seem to be very slowly converging. There was a time not long ago when Photoshop “art” did not even exist, and traditional artists and art enthusiasts would have shuddered at even the thought. But technological advances, and out-of-the-box thinking have given rise to digitally produced works that are more than computer generated, but thoughtfully composed using time-honored techniques. Los Angeles-based digital artist and designer Anthony Gargasz is one such artist whose work seems to rise above. Gargasz’s thought-provoking series Metallic Faces takes an organic human form, and imposes mechanical attributes, with great effect, color and contrast. Fine, indeed.

Via anthonygargasz.com

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There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

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You may already be familiar with the work of contemporary American artist Scott Blake. Blake’s work is not only visually compelling, but also engaging and usually interactive. Some of his most prominent works involve bar codes (aptly called Barcode Art), which fittingly mock consumerism and the increasing societal dominance of big data. Blake has a clear love of technology, and uses it in incredible, sometimes controversial, ways. His “Chuck Close Filter” which emulated a technique made famous by the celebrated artist, for instance, was shut down by Close himself, citing jeopardy to his livelihood and trivializing his work. We are not even scratching the surface of Blake’s growing body of work, nor are we doing it much justice. Be sure to visit Blake’s site and take it all in first-hand.

Via barcodeart.com and YouTube

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We love 3D work that is done thoughtfully and with purpose. And we also have a certain fondness for serial work… that is, work that is part of a series. This terrific set of numbers by Hamburg, Germany-based art director/designer/CGI artist Antoni Tudisco (along with Bucharest-based Andrei Brovcenco) certainly fits the bill. Commissioned by the Financial Times luxury lifestyle magazine, How To Spend It, these numeric characters are expertly constructed in a 3D universe to represent a variety of luxurious goods, including jewelry, gems, precious metals, plush fabrics, floral arrangements, upscale furniture, and even a sailboat. Thanks to incredible advances in 3D technology, and certainly the remarkable talents of Tudisco, the realism achieved here is phenomenal. Nicely done.

Via Behance

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Done well, photo manipulation can stop you in your tracks. Advances in software technology, particularly Photoshop, have allowed artists to explore surreal scenarios, once restricted to visions inside one’s head, like never before. The cultural and artistic movement known as surrealism began in the early 1920s, and arguably continues today to some degree, with the rise of said technological advances. One such artist engaging in making art that blurs the lines between dream and reality is Mumbai-based Anil Saxena. Saxena is particularly adept at Photoshop, and has a playful sort of style, but does not utilize his skills haphazardly. He creates thoughtful work, and is extremely detail oriented. In his own words, Saxena says “If the image is a success but my work goes unnoticed, I’m doing my job well.” We couldn’t agree more.

More current surrealist art here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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Our love of food here at Barbour is no secret. In fact, it’s a requirement. So we pose the question, is there anything better than this project? Actually initiated by the 8-year-old son of New York City area-based writer/designer/blogger Chris Durso, The Foodnited States of America is a deliciously terrific tour of the U.S. Sure, there have been plenty of food-geography mashups (here and here), but this one is different. The “punny” play on words sells it, and the superb execution knocks it out of the park. Durso rolls out states one-by-one on his Instagram page (hashtag #foodnitedstates), and he’s just passed the halfway mark. This is one to watch, folks. Sampling below, but be sure to head over to Durso’s Instagram for more.

Via Instagram and foodiggity.com

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In many industries, some of the most innovative ideas come from young minds. And that is certainly the case here. Simin Qiu, product/industrial design student at the prestigious Royal College of Art in London, conceived the beautiful Swirl faucet. Not only is it aesthetically brilliant, with its elaborately patterned latticework of water streams which are sent through a double turbine inside the fixture, but also conservation conscious, as said turbines limit the flow of water by 15%. Qiu’s work was fittingly awarded a renowned iF Design Concept Award, an international competition recognizing various design disciplines. We really admire how Qiu’s inspiration from nature yielded such an inventive device that could truly make an impact on several levels. Outstanding.

Via Behance

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Creativity manifests itself in different ways. We certainly appreciate well-planned, laborious works of art. But we also love seemingly effortless, spontaneous pieces that sort of continuously flow. German-born, New York-based Christoph Niemann is a prolific illustrator/artist, who bills himself as a visual story teller. And that moniker could not be more fitting. You may be familiar with his work, often featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time, The New Yorker, Wired, and others, as well as authoring a number of books. For his weekly Sunday Sketches series, Niemann employs mixed media techniques in some pretty terrific ways, then generously posts them to Instagram for general consumption. His use if everyday objects as part of his sketches is both clever and playful. Niemann seems to see the world through a different lens, creating design-envy worthy work with each piece. We’re definitely going to bookmark this and check back often. Well done.

Via Instagram and christophniemann.com

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