Archives for category: Environmental

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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At one time or another, we’ve all experienced the satisfaction of a perfectly timed photo. Being in the right place at the right time can be everything. Just ask Missouri-bred, New York-based photographer Jonathan Higbee, who capitalizes on those moments in his outstanding series “Coincidences.” Described as his “love letter to New York, and to the infinite number of magical, ephemeral and serendipitous moments that make it a city unlike any other,” Higbee credits his awe-inspiring collection of moments to exploring the streets of the Big Apple for over a decade. In his own words, Higbee explains, “This work explores the relationship city dwellers share with their chaotic, demanding urban environments. The pervasive and growing sources of overstimulation (giant glowing advertisements, traffic sounds, odors from food carts, etc.) all fight for the precious attention of passersby. “Coincidences” attempts to stabilize this instability and reveal the uncanny stories that arise when the crush of urban discord experiences brief moments of harmony.” Higbee’s work is harmonious, indeed… striking all the right chords from masterful composition to that element of surprise and delight, and often humor. Keep an eye out for Higbee’s forthcoming book featuring never before seen work!

Via Instagram

Graphic design is a key tool in activism, no matter the cause. Arresting (designed) visuals have historically been a cornerstone of social and political change. As time marches on, and we become more connected, original ideas seem harder to come by. Visuals become derivative over time, not necessarily intentionally but often subconsciously. So when we see something that stands out, we take notice. As is the case with this Greenpeace campaign by powerhouse ad agency Young & Rubicam. Not only are we taken with the straightforward and impactful concept, but also the execution. It appears to be a masterclass in 3D modeling in our estimation, with stunning details that truly blur the lines between CGI and reality. Simply put, it’s a terrific use of modern design technology that really communicates an important message effectively.

Via Behance

Love is in the air on this Valentine’s Day, but Los Angeles-based artists DJ Neff and Paul Ramirez promote a different kind of love. Started in 2011, this collaboration has blossomed into a full-fledged non-profit organization, CANLOVE, whose mission is to upcycle otherwise discarded or abandoned spray paint cans. Over the years, they have saved (by hand!) some 15,000+ spray paint cans from the landfill. And in the process created some beautiful, innovative and intriguing artwork. Armed with “spray bouquets”, blooming flower creations and heart-shaped works, CANLOVE can suit all your Valentine’s Day needs (visit their Flower Shop here). Not only do we love their work on a purely artistic level, but the fact that this work also has a purpose really makes our hearts pound.

Via canlove.org

Imagine a post-apocalyptic world where social media companies are no longer the powerhouses they are today, but rather crumbling relics from the past. That’s exactly what self-taught Romanian digital artist Andrei Lacatusu envisioned when conceiving his arresting series Social Decay. Not only is Lacatusu’s technical skill amazing, but we love the concept, which flies in the face of all we know to be true at this present moment. And that’s what makes this series so striking. These logos, including Facebook, Google, and Instagram, are slick, closely curated marks that sort of define the current era. So to see them dilapidated, weather-worn and abandoned forces a double take, especially at this level of realism. Lacatusu’s perspective is provocative and timely, elevating this series well beyond a masterclass in CGI.

Via Behance

    

The artist who brought us the Political Lamp (here) has another intriguing and unsettling creation: the Earthquake Lamp. Much like his work on the Political Lamp, French artist known only as ParseError explores art, design, technology, and science through this fascinating object. Linked to data from IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), the Earthquake Lamp responds in real time to earthquakes from around the world with pulsing lights and an unsettling sort of rumble. As an object, it’s really quite beautiful. But the meaningful, connected aspect elevates it well beyond just a decorative piece. The technology is so nuanced, its light and sound output changes according to the location and magnitude of the earthquake, varying the color and duration of the pulsations, and the power of the sound. Ironically, (what appears to be) its glass tube design looks quite fragile, so in the event of a local earthquake, one may be left with a pile of glass. Either way, ParseError has done it again… walking that line between anxiety and fascination. And evoking emotion is what art is all about.

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

With the majesty of the changing seasons fully upon us, we thought it fitting to look at the stunning work of Los Angeles-based photographer/filmmaker Niaz Uddin. His awe-inspiring photographs of natural landscapes often shot from an aerial perspective, have a beautiful, supersaturated feel that capitalizes on gorgeous colors found in nature.

Via niazuddin.com and Instagram

UK photographer/artist Caroline South has an eye for color, order, and harmony. We have no idea what her home life is like, but if her truly satisfying work is any indication, we imagine it to be a utopia of tidy arrangements by color. We’ve said it before (here and here and here)… order (as in sequence, categorization, systemization) is innately pleasing to the human brain. And South hits our brains from all sides with her meticulous photographs, often composed of found objects from regular beachcombing. From ombre to rainbow order, South’s keen eye for both color and composition is at the heart of her work. For those suffering from color OCD, has South got the fix for you!

Via carolinesouth.co and Instagram

Time-based photography can be powerful and very telling. And few know this better than Danish photographer Peter Funch. For nearly a decade, Funch photographed the ritualistic exodus from (presumably) home to work. Funch took up a post just outside of Grand Central Station in New York City, as morning commuters scurried the streets of Manhattan in the morning hour between 8:30 and 9:30 AM. Just as his new book’s title states, Funch’s fastidious documentation took place at the corner of 42nd and Vanderbilt. During the editing process, Funch began to notice patterns… the same folks were being captured days, weeks and even years apart (and often wearing the same outfits). And, often, these familiar strangers were traveling in packs next to or near each other daily, paying little attention to one another, day after day, week after week. Funch’s work captures these fascinating patterns and really speaks to cliches about the daily grind, monotonous routines of daily life… about the proverbial rat race.

Via peterfunch.com and Instagram

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