Archives for category: Food

We particularly love when artists give everyday objects new context. Not only does this type of work capitalize on the element of surprise, but it also gives the viewer a glimpse into a creative mind. Artists who create these works (some past features here and here and here) see the world from a unique perspective. As is the case with self-proclaimed “Fantasy Researcher” Diego Cusano. Cusano, who has a background in visual arts and graphic design, explores the use of simple everyday objects in unexpected and creative ways. And so much so, in fact, that some high profile clients have taken notice and hired him for various campaigns, including Warner Bros., Adidas, Diesel, Dior, Cartier, Haribo, among others. In his own words, Cusano explains his work: “I started watching things from a different point of view, and from this new approach, I started creating the illustrations that, since then, I’m publishing each day on the social networks. Objects change their native function through the graphic to a new, different, unpredictable function. I always try to “re-invent” myself. I would like to give smiles when people look at my works.” It’s safe to say Cusano’s objective is on-point and wildly successful. His work definitely brings smiles to our faces.

Via diegocusano.com and Instagram

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The beauty of the mosaic art form is how the experience changes based on the viewing distance. Wisconsin-bred, New York-based artist Kevin Champeny capitalizes on this dichotomy by creating custom hand cast urethane objects that comprise the resulting assemblage that complement the full meaning of each piece. Champeny’s work is not only visually impactful, but he drives his concepts further through these distinctive methods. Champeny explains in his own words: “I create a style of work that blurs the lines between photography, painting, and sculpting. Mosaics enable me to elicit the tension and stories between the sculpted and cast pixels and the overall image they compose. My art opens a conversation for the viewer. I want people to think about what these pieces mean to them and how their own experiences make sense of the choices I made when creating the work.”

More mosaic art here and here and here.

Via kevinchampeny.com

 

At a time when our collective consciousness is so acutely aware of gender roles, and (a long overdue) war has been waged against sexist practices and other gender issues, Lebanon-based photographer/visual artist Eli Rezkallah turns twisted gender roles depicted in vintage advertisements on their heads. Rezkallah painstakingly recreated some blatantly sexist ads, but with a reversal of gender roles to convey just how these absurd and deep-rooted gender stereotypes were portrayed to the masses just decades ago. Rezkallah also comments on how past generations continue to perpetuate these oversimplified ideas about the roles of women and men: “Last Thanksgiving, I overheard my uncles talk about how women are better off cooking, taking care of the kitchen, and fulfilling ‘their womanly duties’. Although I know that not all men like my uncles think that way I was surprised to learn that some still do, so I went on to imagine a parallel universe, where roles are inverted and men are given a taste of their own sexist poison.” If nothing else, Rezkallah’s work should make you giggle (and perhaps even gasp).

Via elirezkallah.com

 

There’s no denying our love for photo manipulation. With the right blend of humor and irony, this niche art form can really soar. Which is precisely the case for the work of California-based designer Randy Lewis and his This or That series. Lewis capitalizes on the power of juxtaposition with great success. And his Photoshop skills are not too shabby either. Following are a few of our favorites.

More photo manipulation here and here and here.

Via randylewiscreative.com

Playing with one’s food is a favorite pastime for many. Few carry that over into adulthood, but we certainly appreciate when artists take food to another level (here and here and here). So when we came across the work of this Russian art duo, we just had to share. Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov collaborated to recreate famous paintings… using food, and they really nailed them. Their attention to detail is just incredible. Their love of both food and art is clear. Just as food tastes better when it’s “made with love”, the same applies to art, in our estimation. Shkondina and Tivanov love what they do, and it shows.

Via Behance

It’s that time of year again… costumed children walking door-to-door for candy and chocolate. Though if your little munchkin came home with an anatomically correct chocolate cranium, you’d probably question who your neighbors really are. Not necessarily meant for just Halloween, UK chocolatier Black Chocolate Co. prides themselves in marrying their love of chocolate and art, and being a purveyor of “hideously tasty anatomical wares”. That’s right, they hand-cast premium Belgian chocolate from authentic human skulls. Go ahead and take a moment to let that sink in.

Via Etsy

Photo manipulation, at its very core, is surrealist. The results are often unnerving and illogical, but with photographic precision. London-based creative production studio Happy Finish offers high-end retouching as one of its many capabilities to a vast array of notable clients including Nike, Google, Samsonite, Gillette and Smirnoff, to name a few. Here are a handful of samples of Happy Finish’s work that could honestly stand on their own, outside of any marketing context, as thought-provoking works of art. Hats off to the talented artists at Happy Finish for elevating CGI to a whole new level.

More surrealist work here and here and here.

Via Behance

Melbourne, Australia-based contemporary artist Ben Frost has a pop art aesthetic with a subversive, confrontational spirit. In some of his most recent work, Frost essentially uses mainly (junk) food and pharmaceutical packaging as a canvas for his bold illustrations inspired by pop culture, Roy Lichtenstein, and manga. His mashups are not random, though… Frost exhibits his mastery of juxtaposition with these works in a way that can be truly provocative. Through his work, Frost continually pushes boundaries and challenges social norms while addressing our advertising-soaked, consumer-obsessed culture. In his own statement, Frost describes: “By subverting mainstream iconography from the worlds of advertising, entertainment, and politics, he creates a visual framework that is bold, confronting and often controversial.”

Via benfrostisdead.com

Creative duo Michelle Maguire and Kelsey McClellan, otherwise known as Terrence Caviar, are a stylist and photographer team, respectively, whose latest project marries some of our favorites: color, series, and of course food. At its core, Wardrobe Snacks explores thoughtful pairings of various colors and textures. McClellan’s closely cropped photos perfectly capture Maguire’s monochromatic styling, all while touching on a familiar scenario: eating on the go. In their own words, Terrence Caviar describe the series in their own words: “Wardrobe Snacks was inspired by diners lacking the luxury of being seated at a table: Michelle’s stepdad who rests his sandwich on his thigh (hell with a plate!) in between bites while he blasts an action movie on his TV; a commuter cramped up on a crowded bus retrieving an item from a bag or pocket; a lunch-breaker on a park bench eating from her lap. They’re informal — perhaps even a bit awkward — spaces as far as eating is concerned, yet the diner always appears to be comfortable and perfectly satisfied with his chosen snack, almost zen-like.” Prints available here. More conceptual photography posts here and here and here.

Via terrencecaviar.com

In an effort to pay homage to some superb Italian design manifested widely through consumer goods, Italian-American designer Gianluca Gimini conceived this series of fictional co-branded sneakers. Looking at Gimini’s body of work, particularly this imaginative series, appropriately titled “Sneakered”, it’s clear that Gimini operates on a creative plane not easily defined. At a time when consumers (very broadly speaking) seem to be steeped in the marketing of nostalgia, Gimini capitalizes on that trend and also taps into a youth culture that holds footwear, specifically sneakers, in high regard. Think of it as an exercise in mashing up historical examples of excellent product design with a vehicle that has global youth appeal (sneakers). Brilliant.

Via Behance

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