Archives for category: illustration

We particularly love when artists give everyday objects new context. Not only does this type of work capitalize on the element of surprise, but it also gives the viewer a glimpse into a creative mind. Artists who create these works (some past features here and here and here) see the world from a unique perspective. As is the case with self-proclaimed “Fantasy Researcher” Diego Cusano. Cusano, who has a background in visual arts and graphic design, explores the use of simple everyday objects in unexpected and creative ways. And so much so, in fact, that some high profile clients have taken notice and hired him for various campaigns, including Warner Bros., Adidas, Diesel, Dior, Cartier, Haribo, among others. In his own words, Cusano explains his work: “I started watching things from a different point of view, and from this new approach, I started creating the illustrations that, since then, I’m publishing each day on the social networks. Objects change their native function through the graphic to a new, different, unpredictable function. I always try to “re-invent” myself. I would like to give smiles when people look at my works.” It’s safe to say Cusano’s objective is on-point and wildly successful. His work definitely brings smiles to our faces.

Via diegocusano.com and Instagram

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It’s no secret that we love admiring typographic projects (here and here and here). When we came across this gem from German studio/duo FOREAL (previously featured here), which harkens back to childhood memories filled with cartoon references, we were immediately drawn in. We absolutely love this series and the sheer variety FOREAL was able to employ. While each letterform is vastly different, they all work nicely as a set. As for the 36 Days of Type design challenge that sparked this series in the first place, FOREAL absolutely killed it. Quite simply, #designenvy. This is just a sampling, be sure to check out the entire collection on FOREAL’s Instagram (here).

Via weareforeal.com

The beauty of the mosaic art form is how the experience changes based on the viewing distance. Wisconsin-bred, New York-based artist Kevin Champeny capitalizes on this dichotomy by creating custom hand cast urethane objects that comprise the resulting assemblage that complement the full meaning of each piece. Champeny’s work is not only visually impactful, but he drives his concepts further through these distinctive methods. Champeny explains in his own words: “I create a style of work that blurs the lines between photography, painting, and sculpting. Mosaics enable me to elicit the tension and stories between the sculpted and cast pixels and the overall image they compose. My art opens a conversation for the viewer. I want people to think about what these pieces mean to them and how their own experiences make sense of the choices I made when creating the work.”

More mosaic art here and here and here.

Via kevinchampeny.com

 

Imagine a post-apocalyptic world where social media companies are no longer the powerhouses they are today, but rather crumbling relics from the past. That’s exactly what self-taught Romanian digital artist Andrei Lacatusu envisioned when conceiving his arresting series Social Decay. Not only is Lacatusu’s technical skill amazing, but we love the concept, which flies in the face of all we know to be true at this present moment. And that’s what makes this series so striking. These logos, including Facebook, Google, and Instagram, are slick, closely curated marks that sort of define the current era. So to see them dilapidated, weather-worn and abandoned forces a double take, especially at this level of realism. Lacatusu’s perspective is provocative and timely, elevating this series well beyond a masterclass in CGI.

Via Behance

    

As we’ve mentioned before, we occasionally have a lapse of design envy. It doesn’t happen too often… after all, we are a pretty terrifically creative bunch here at Barbour. But sometimes we encounter work that is just so damn brilliant. So good, in a “why didn’t we think of that?” sort of way, that we have to concede our envy publicly (in a good way, of course). In this instance, it’s the illustrious work of New York-based designer and letterer Nick Misani. Though we are absolutely taken with Misani’s entire stunning body of work, we are particularly impressed with his ongoing Fauxsiacs series. Here, Misani hones his stellar lettering skills in the context of realistic mosaic illustrations to great effect. Misani’s work is clearly historically influenced, with a modern twist, and it’s no surprise that he has worked with design icon Louise Fili, perhaps the highest compliment. We will be keeping an eye on this series, which features destinations from around the world. The possibilities are endless, and hopefully coming to a city near you! Prints available here.

Via fauxsaics.com and Instagram

Musical mashups often produce unexpectedly interesting results. The fusion of contrasting artists and genres can make for some pretty special compositions. Los Angeles-based artist (and United States Air Force Staff Sergeant) Corban Lundborg, also known as COLD, recently explored this concept visually after being commissioned to create artwork inspired by vinyl (hence the 12″ square design). Lundborg draws inspiration from both arresting and iconic vinyl logos, and his love of hip-hop. His series VINYL features hip-hop legends adorned with classic rock logos, and the result is terrific. But Lundborg doesn’t just haphazardly create these combos… his process seems much more thoughtful than that. Take “West Side of the Moon” for instance. Perhaps the strongest of the bunch, Lundborg places Pink Floyd’s famous Dark Side of the Moon logo over Tupac’s third eye, “inspired by his revolutionary message and social maturity. The refracting of light occurs when a wave enters a medium where its speed is different, and Tupac approached the music industry at an unmatched momentum.” Lundborg’s work, too, embodies a rebellious spirit that we really admire. His clear creative talent paired with his contemplative approach is a recipe for success. And we wish nothing but the best for this brilliant young artist’s future.

Via cold-studio.com

Just as the title of this intriguing series (and cleverly named… “Alt Disney”) implies, UK artist/illustrator/designer Tom Ward brings some beloved Disney characters into an alternative view. Ward’s depictions are a bit askew, transporting familiar faces that have been with us for some 70 years into the present. We find it particularly interesting how the introduction of the ubiquitous smartphone changes everything in a few of these pieces. And even serves as social commentary, especially in the instance of Ward’s The Sword and the Stone piece where young Arthur has his nose in a phone, basically too engaged to be bothered with the sword. Really makes us think about our collective love affair with our phones, and about possible missed opportunities because of it. The point is, on the surface these pieces are fun, but there really is so much more. Hats off to Ward for striking that balance brilliantly.

More alternative Disney art here and here and here.

Via Instagram

British artist Nick Smith speaks the visual language of a true contemporary artist. His work is thoughtful, compelling and current. Seemingly inspired by 8-bit graphics of his youth, Smith recreates recognizable paintings from a variety of famous artists using little more than a brilliant sense of color and some custom Pantone Color Chips. Though the work he’s recreating employs broad ranges of color and is often very detailed, his pixelated reinterpretations are still remarkably recognizable. True to Smith’s attention to detail, he does not use standard Pantone chips, but rather customizes them with specific names that relate to the artwork they comprise, adding another layer of dimension to these already impressive works.

More pixelated work here and here and here.

Via smithandstuff.com and Instagram

Posters are some of our favorite, yet challenging, projects. Poster design is a marriage between visual aesthetic and the delivery of information, between textual and graphical elements… the very fundamentals of graphic design. It should come as no surprise, then, that an institution as important and influential as the New York Film Festival places great emphasis on this visual embodiment of its annual event. Festival organizers manage to recruit some truly respected artists and photographers year after year for its remarkable posters. Below is just a sampling, starting with this year’s by renowned sculptor Richard Serra.

Via nytimes.com

Having a close relationship with marketing at ESPN, we see (and create ourselves) lots of sports-related designs. We recently came across the work of a young Texas-based designer by the name of Nick Bascus. His growing portfolio as a whole has a very nice aesthetic, and he has a clear grasp of graphic design fundamentals like color and typography. But the work that really shines is Bascus’s series of low-polygon illustrations and posters featuring some current NBA stars. These killer designs hit all the right notes, from composition to color choices. Bascus could easily expand on this series with great success, and we honestly hope to see his work on the pages of ESPN The Magazine (nudge, nudge… @espnmag) someday soon.

Via nickbascus.com

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