Archives for category: Logos

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At the risk of sounding totally geeky, there’s nothing quite like a really well executed corporate identity. No matter the industry, effective branding design gets us excited. This example, by German-based designer Luca Fontana, of a logo and identity for a plant nursery in Italy is a perfect specimen of a very thoughtfully conceived and flawlessly executed package. From Fontana’s choice of color and fonts, to his embrace of the circle as a foundation for his forms, we can’t say enough about our admiration of this work.

Other examples of brilliant branding here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Abram Games (July 29, 1914 – August 27, 1996) was born the same year as Paul Rand and died the same year too. (August 15, 1914 – November 26, 1996). Now he is commemorated in a stamp issued by the Royal Mail.

click.designcommunity-hub.com

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Royal Mail celebrates a selection of remarkable individuals from the realms of sport, design, economics, heroism and the arts with the ‘Remarkable Lives’ stamp issue. Completing the issue is pioneering graphic designer Abram Games. The style of his work — refined but vigorous compared to the work of contemporaries — has earned him a place in the pantheon of the best of 20th-century graphic designers. In acknowledging his power as a propagandist, he claimed, “I wind the spring and the public, in looking at the poster, will have that spring released in its mind.” Because of the length of his career — over six decades — his work is essentially a record of the era’s social history. Some of Britain’s most iconic images include those by Games. An example is the “Join the ATS” propaganda poster of 1941, nicknamed the “Blonde Bombshell” recruitment poster. From 1942, during World War II, Games’s service as the Official War Artist for posters resulted in 100 or so posters. His work is recognized for its “striking colour, bold graphic ideas, and beautifully integrated typography”.
His freelance work brought him clients such as Shell, Financial Times, Guinness, British Airways, London Transport, El Al and the United Nations. He designed stamps for Britain, Ireland, Israel, Jersey and Portugal. As well as book jackets for Penguin Books and logos for the 1951 Festival of Britain (winning the 1948 competition) and the 1965 Queen’s Award to Industry. Evidence of his pioneering contributions is the first (1953) moving on-screen symbol of BBC Television. He was awarded an OBE in 1957.

Sources: The Daily Heller; Souter, Nick and Tessa (2012). The Illustration Handbook: A Guide to the World’s Greatest Illustrators. Oceana; David Smith (30 September 2007). “Poster Churchill pulped on show”. The Observer. Retrieved 27 August 2013.

You may have caught wind of this brilliant design exercise, Football as Football, that’s slowly gaining popularity online. It’s a labor of love for six Minneapolis-based creative professionals who share three common interests: American football, soccer and design. The concept is actually simple… reimagining NFL team logos as European soccer club badges. But we know that’s not as easy as it sounds. The very capable (and creative) hands of this design team are pulling it off beautifully. Their goal is to create and release four sets of 32 logos over the course of the American football season. Looking awesome so far, we will continue to follow their progress.

Via footballasfootball.com

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As designers, we notice all things design. And it’s everywhere. Literally. London-based illustrator/designer/artist (and sneakerhead) Stephen Cheetham has a keen eye for sneaker boxes. This series of prints (for sale here) explores the evolution of packaging for several revered sneaker brands. Would love to see Cheetham’s take on Puma!

Via stephencheetham.com

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Design and marketing for the arts often goes one of two ways: really good or really bad. From what we’ve seen, budgets often correlate directly with how well such materials are conceived and implemented. In this instance, German designer Caroline Grohs imagines a beautiful corporate identity for a fictitious theater company (with a robust marketing budget). Grohs’ concept and design execution are outstanding. From the color palette, to the imaginative wire-frame graphics, to the superb typography, this really is a well rounded piece. Bravo!

Via Behance

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We do have a certain fondness for food photography (here, here and here), so when we come across something special, we have to share. Allan Peters, Minneapolis-based in-house senior art director for Target, was at the helm of this superb “Food for Thought” series aimed at increasing awareness about grocery products in Canadian Target outlets. Illustrator/letterer Danielle Evans did an amazing job getting her hands dirty and bringing the concept to life (in both English and French!). Well done.

Via allanpeters.com and marmaladebleue.com

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London-based illustrator/designer Federica Bonfanti designed this bucket list, of sorts, of places to visit before you die (complete with checklist to keep score). What catches our eye here is just how well rounded this piece is. The level of detail Bonfanti achieves in each “badge” is really something. Her keen eye for typography is spot-on, capturing some personality of each city. Each “badge” can certainly stand on its own (and some are actually for sale as individual prints). And her sense of color is also notable. Great piece any way you slice it… very inspiring.

Via federicabonfanti.com

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Chinese sculptor Li Lihong juxtaposes contemporary corporate logos with traditional Chinese imagery and ceramic techniques, with fantastic results. The series is a sculptural mashup of corporate identity and fine art, of contemporary and traditional, of East and West, of old and new. Western business has become integrated into Chinese culture, and Lihong’s work seems to embrace it.

Via Facebook

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Whether you have a sweet tooth or not, you’ll surely appreciate this monochromatic Sugar Series by Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe. We love orderly groupings (here and here), and food, of course (here and here and here). And this is the best of both worlds. Great series.

Via thesewoods.com

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