Archives for category: Retail

It’s been a while since we featured the work of Los Angeles-based design and illustration studio DKNG (previous posts here and here). Since we had just looked at some stellar minimalist bird illustrations, we thought DKNG’s dog breed illustrations a fitting followup. Design duo Dan Kuhlken and Nathan Goldman were commissioned by Golden Doodle “lifestyle brand for dog lovers” to illustrate ten of their favorite dog breeds, which were eventually used for some rad swag aimed at dog lovers. The results are terrific! We love DKNG’s bold, clean style.

Via dkngstudios.com

DKNG-01 DKNG-02 DKNG-03 DKNG-04 DKNG-05 DKNG-06 DKNG-07 DKNG-08 DKNG-09 DKNG-10 DKNG-11 DKNG-12 DKNG-13 DKNG-14 DKNG-15

Advertisements

Serial projects, that is, ones that are repeated at daily intervals for a set period of time, are really an exemplification of self discipline and ferocious creativity. One such example is a project called 100 Hoopties by Detroit-bred, Los Angeles-based designer and cyclist Jenny Beatty. While completing a masters program at SVA in NYC, Beatty spent one hundred consecutive days immersed in her two loves: design and cycling. Beatty exercised her stellar design skills and unending creativity while reimagining iconic pieces of artwork using only scrapped bicycle parts. In her own words, “The idea came about very serendipitously. I was living above a bike shop that was going out of business, and would walk past coming home every night to a sidewalk filled with left over “junk”. One day I came across a pretty much new set of mustache handlebars with butchers basket and snapped the gem up for future use. The bars/basket sat on my landing for the next 5 months – taunting me to do something with them. When the time came to submit our ideas for 100 days – I tried to think of something that would summarize my life of cyclist and graphic designer. As I was writing out my thoughts, I kept trying to find ways to use this basket and handlebars but it wasn’t until I started thinking about taking it apart that the magic happened.” Magical, indeed. Here are a few of our favorites.

More serial projects here and here and here.

Via 100hoopties.com

Beatty-01 Beatty-02 Beatty-03 Beatty-04 Beatty-05 Beatty-06 Beatty-07 Beatty-08 Beatty-09 Beatty-10 Beatty-11 Beatty-12 Beatty-13

Paper craft, using paper as the primary artistic medium for the creation of three-dimensional objects, is a highly specialized expression of one’s creativity. Though we don’t create this type of art ourselves, we certainly admire those who do (here and here and here). Milan-based artist Mauro Seresini is no exception. With little more than X-Acto knives and stockpiles of Bristol board, Seresini’s work ranges from editorial to advertising to commissions to large and small scale installations, and has attracted such luxury brands as Valentino, Tod’s and Lavazza. There is a certain unmistakable elegance to Seresini’s work, which clearly drew these clients to him. And the fact that Seresini is self-taught only heightens our affinity for his work. A true artist, through and through.

Via mauroseresini.com and Behance

Seresini-01 Seresini-02 Seresini-03 Seresini-04 Seresini-05 Seresini-06 Seresini-07 Seresini-08 Seresini-09 Seresini-10 Seresini-11 Seresini-12 Seresini-13 Seresini-14 Seresini-15 Seresini-16 Seresini-17 Seresini-18 Seresini-19

The work of Montreal-based Mathieu Lévesque is, quite simply, a masterclass in food photography. We are in awe of Lévesque’s ability to apply his own creative vision to everything he (re)touches. His attention to detail is remarkable. And the wit and whimsy present in so much of his work elevates it to the next level. We are engaged on many levels by his work… inspired, envious and hungry!

Via Behance

Levesque-01 Levesque-02 Levesque-03 Levesque-04 Levesque-05 Levesque-06 Levesque-07 Levesque-08 Levesque-09 Levesque-10 Levesque-11 Levesque-12 Levesque-13 Levesque-14 Levesque-15 Levesque-16 Levesque-17 Levesque-18

Negative space as a design device may look simple to the average person, but it’s actually quite complicated to effectively pull off. Few present-day artists know this better than illustrator/designer/artist Tang Yau Hoong. Malaysia-based Hoong has an awesome body of work (see previous post here), a good portion of which explores the interplay of positive and negative spaces. At quick glance, Hoong’s work is simple and fun, with inviting color palettes and pleasing compositions. But upon further inspection, there’s more to them, which is always a pleasant and impressive surprise. His work is fittingly popular on Threadless, and also available for sale here.

More negative space here and here and here.

Via tangyauhoong.com

Hoong-01 Hoong-02 Hoong-03 Hoong-04 Hoong-05 Hoong-06 Hoong-07 Hoong-08 Hoong-09 Hoong-10 Hoong-11 Hoong-12

Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

Mathery-01 Mathery-02 Mathery-03 Mathery-04 Mathery-05 Mathery-06 Mathery-07 Mathery-08 Mathery-09

Romania-born, New York City-based illustrator/designer/art director Daniel Nyari employs a distinct style of bulbous shapes and bold colors in a geometric and cubist sort of way. And we love it, as do his impressive roster of clients, which includes ESPN, Wired, GQ, Adidas, National Geographic, Microsoft, Men’s Health, among others. Nyari says he wants “to make art that looks like it was made by a computer which thinks it’s human.” His process is methodical and based on a grid, and this thoughtfulness shows. Nyari’s body of work is comprised of a great deal of football (soccer) projects, which is clearly a passion, and derives naturally from his European roots. But make no mistake, this is not a hobby for Nyari. He’s a terrific illustrator who has found his way and is making his mark in a crowded landscape of creatives.

Via iamdany.com

Nyari-01 Nyari-02 Nyari-03 Nyari-04 Nyari-05 Nyari-06 Nyari-07 Nyari-08 Nyari-09 Nyari-10 Nyari-11 Nyari-12 Nyari-13 Nyari-14 Nyari-15 Nyari-16 Nyari-17 Nyari-18 Nyari-19 Nyari-20 Nyari-21 Nyari-22 Nyari-23 Nyari-24

Though recent weather patterns may suggest otherwise, summer is merely a fleeting memory, with that autumn feeling fast approaching. We recently stumbled upon the phenomenal work of Madrid-based studio Serial Cut, and more particularly a video they created for fashion/style giant DIESEL (who we are also especially fond of), that harkens back to those sultry summer days in the not so distant past. Showcasing their Spring/Summer collection, DIESEL commissioned Serial Cut to create this glossy, gravity defying promo loop, Melting Props, to display in store windows. We often find ourselves in awe of really well executed 3D/CGI work (here and here and here)… and Serial Cut’s work is among the best we’ve seen. In their own words: “A digital celebration of summer featuring pieces from this collection, including footwear, sunglasses, and bags, all inhabiting a glossy landscape. An ice cream cone, surfboard, and basketball all melt and dripping in the heat, encapsulated in a candy coating that shimmers through a rainbow of blues, greens, and pinks, with movements emphasizing the suspension of natural law as texture. Get into a surreal summer immersion, where gravity is merely a suggestion!”

Via serialcut.com

SerialCut-01 SerialCut-02 SerialCut-03 SerialCut-04 SerialCut-05

While fashion and still life photography can be very straightforward, we’re always pleased when we see it take a conceptual turn. London-based Lithuanian photographer Aleksandra Kingo is particularly adept at elevating her work to art. Her personality shines through, and makes for some very compelling work. In her own words, her work is “feminine, a bit awkward and full of irony. She believes that photography should be personal and loves the possibility of creating any kind of world through her medium. Most of her work is based around people and their identities and she gains a lot inspiration from everyday life stories as well as popular culture.”

Via aleksandrakingo.com

Kingo-01 Kingo-02 Kingo-03 Kingo-04 Kingo-05 Kingo-06 Kingo-07 Kingo-08 Kingo-09 Kingo-10 Kingo-11 Kingo-12 Kingo-13 Kingo-14 Kingo-15 Kingo-16 Kingo-17 Kingo-18 Kingo-19

Bucking tradition, and just about every rule in a marketer’s playbook, global powerhouse brand Coca-Cola has taken a bold stance on topic du jour: equality and prejudice. In observation of the month of Ramadan in the Middle East, Coca-Cola has, for the first time in its storied 129 year history, stripped its cans of its iconic script logo in an effort to demonstrate a world without labels. Aptly titled “No Labels”, the campaign is sort of a social experiment to get into the minds of people regarding labels, preconceptions and stereotypes in general. Bearing nothing but its highly recognizable “dynamic ribbon” and the message “Labels are for cans not for people”, the limited-edition cans make a bold and beautiful statement. As designers, we are drawn to the visual simplicity juxtaposed with the powerful message. It’s actually rather telling of the current corporate branding landscape at large: businesses are opting to streamline their identities by making their logos simpler and flatter. Be sure to check out Coca-Cola’s masterful commercial to accompany the socially conscious campaign.

Via coca-colacompany.com

Coca-Cola-1 Coca-Cola-2 Coca-Cola-3 Coca-Cola-4 Coca-Cola-5

%d bloggers like this: