Archives for category: Video

Graffiti as we know it is a little less radical these days, much to the disappointment of some. Now sometimes referred to as street art, it has been elevated to just that: art. And with this new cultural regard comes greater exposure. We recently stumbled upon the work of Portuguese artist Sergio Odeith thanks to said exposure, and there is no doubt that his skills are highly artistic, “street” or otherwise. Odeith plays with our minds with his large-scale anamorphic creations he likes to call “sombre 3D”. His sense of space and perspective are astounding, with flawless artistic skills to match. Some of his works are straight up creepy, but that’s probably the point.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via odeith.com and Instagram

 

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The artist who brought us the Political Lamp (here) has another intriguing and unsettling creation: the Earthquake Lamp. Much like his work on the Political Lamp, French artist known only as ParseError explores art, design, technology, and science through this fascinating object. Linked to data from IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology), the Earthquake Lamp responds in real time to earthquakes from around the world with pulsing lights and an unsettling sort of rumble. As an object, it’s really quite beautiful. But the meaningful, connected aspect elevates it well beyond just a decorative piece. The technology is so nuanced, its light and sound output changes according to the location and magnitude of the earthquake, varying the color and duration of the pulsations, and the power of the sound. Ironically, (what appears to be) its glass tube design looks quite fragile, so in the event of a local earthquake, one may be left with a pile of glass. Either way, ParseError has done it again… walking that line between anxiety and fascination. And evoking emotion is what art is all about.

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

Some of the most moving pieces of art involve the human form. After all, everyone on the planet can relate in some capacity… we are all human. Nature is also an ever-present theme, and artists sometimes explore the relationship between the two. Which is exactly the case for the work of Virginia-based sculptor Christopher David White. But what is really intriguing about White’s incredible body of work is his ability to manipulate perception… in essence, his mastery of illusion (or in art-speak, trompe l’oeil, visual illusion in art, which literally translates to “deceives the eye” from French). Upon inspection, White’s work appears to be intricately sculpted from petrified wood. We might add, if these pieces were sculpted from wood, that would be impressive in and of itself. But these stunning sculptures are actually rendered from clay with an astounding attention to detail. At its core, White’s work is about change. In his own words: “Change is a constant reminder that permanence is the ultimate illusion. It is through the creation of hyper-realistic sculpture that I explore the relationship between nature, man, and the phenomenon of impermanence.”

Via christopherdavidwhite.com

Musical mashups often produce unexpectedly interesting results. The fusion of contrasting artists and genres can make for some pretty special compositions. Los Angeles-based artist (and United States Air Force Staff Sergeant) Corban Lundborg, also known as COLD, recently explored this concept visually after being commissioned to create artwork inspired by vinyl (hence the 12″ square design). Lundborg draws inspiration from both arresting and iconic vinyl logos, and his love of hip-hop. His series VINYL features hip-hop legends adorned with classic rock logos, and the result is terrific. But Lundborg doesn’t just haphazardly create these combos… his process seems much more thoughtful than that. Take “West Side of the Moon” for instance. Perhaps the strongest of the bunch, Lundborg places Pink Floyd’s famous Dark Side of the Moon logo over Tupac’s third eye, “inspired by his revolutionary message and social maturity. The refracting of light occurs when a wave enters a medium where its speed is different, and Tupac approached the music industry at an unmatched momentum.” Lundborg’s work, too, embodies a rebellious spirit that we really admire. His clear creative talent paired with his contemplative approach is a recipe for success. And we wish nothing but the best for this brilliant young artist’s future.

Via cold-studio.com

Playing with one’s food is a favorite pastime for many. Few carry that over into adulthood, but we certainly appreciate when artists take food to another level (here and here and here). So when we came across the work of this Russian art duo, we just had to share. Food stylist Tatiana Shkondina and photographer Sasha Tivanov collaborated to recreate famous paintings… using food, and they really nailed them. Their attention to detail is just incredible. Their love of both food and art is clear. Just as food tastes better when it’s “made with love”, the same applies to art, in our estimation. Shkondina and Tivanov love what they do, and it shows.

Via Behance

With the majesty of the changing seasons fully upon us, we thought it fitting to look at the stunning work of Los Angeles-based photographer/filmmaker Niaz Uddin. His awe-inspiring photographs of natural landscapes often shot from an aerial perspective, have a beautiful, supersaturated feel that capitalizes on gorgeous colors found in nature.

Via niazuddin.com and Instagram

French artist/industrial designer known only as Parse/Error recently created an object that is both beautiful and troubling all at the same time. At face value, the Political Lamp is an aesthetically appealing decor piece… a lovely cylindrical dome housing a curious cloud. But behind this facade is a much darker reality, an intentional and well-conceived parallel to the current political climate. The lamp is actually connected to the internet and designed to react to tweets by President Donald Trump (and other political events) by triggering a storm beneath the dome, complete with lightning rolling in the cloud and disturbing the otherwise peaceful glow of the lamp itself. We are utterly intrigued by this piece, and hope for a day when we can look back in relief that the forecasted storm did not do as much damage as predicted. In his own words, the artist explains the project: “The choice of setting the Political Lamp to follow the tweets of Donald Trump is explained by the fact that he perfectly embodies a dangerous era. A world where the words of one man, released without reflection and with spontaneity on a global social network, can endanger the fate of millions by spreading the ghost of nuclear war on the planet…. the idea of the Political Lamp is to hide its true nature behind a beautiful object, which immediately modifies the observer’s behavior when its purpose is revealed, causing anxiety and fascination.”

Via parseerror.ufunk.net

We’ve seen a lot of intricate artwork fabricated from paper in new and interesting ways, but nothing quite like this. It’s the work of Cuban-born, North Carolina-based artist Felix Semper. While his sculptures resemble traditional stone busts, Semper injects a bit of a twist, literally, into these awesome creations. Rather than a hefty, solid material, Semper’s sculptures are crafted from hundreds of layers of glued paper to allow for surprising and awe-inspiring movement. With these stunning works, Sember flips the art of sculpture on its head… allowing a seemingly solid mass to twist and stretch. While we love all of his work, his most notable piece “Big Poppa” modeled after the late rap icon Notorious B.I.G. really strikes a chord. The juxtaposition of a contemporary figure in such a traditional art form is intriguing in and of itself, but the kinetic nature of Sember’s work makes it truly groundbreaking.

More paper artwork here and here and here.

Via felixsemper.com

Autumn is finally upon us, and time for all things pumpkin spice (don’t get us started), as well as corn mazes and such. Which got us thinking… have you ever seen rice paddy art? Originating in Japan, rice paddy art is achieved when people plant rice of various types and colors to create giant pictures in a paddy field. Inakadate, a Japanese village in the prefecture of Aomori is thought to be the birthplace of this fascinating art form that dates back not thousands of years, but to the early 1990s. As a way to revitalize their village, officials of Inakadate decided to cleverly capitalize on a natural resource of 2,000+ years as a way to boost tourism and celebrate their culture. Since then stunning aerial masterpieces have been created year after year, gaining Inakadate recognition not only through local tourism but also through astounded onlookers by way of the internet (much like yourself). Media company Great Big Story, with their uncanny ability to tell stories, recently produced a beautifully shot piece profiling Inakadate, which garnered their stunning landscape and ingenuity further attention.

Via greatbigstory.com and vill.inakadate.lg.jp

For most artists, the palette knife is used for mixing paint, and in conjunction with brushes for applying paint. Tehran-based artist Salman Khoshroo eliminates brushes altogether. He applies thick layers of oil paint to his (massive) canvases with an arsenal of palette knives with such deliberate precision. Not only does Khoshroo have a deep visual understanding of the human form, but his sense of color is truly astounding. For an application process that seems so heavy-handed, Khoshroo remarkably uses color in clever and sometimes subtle ways as to establish cohesion in these borderline abstract works. We’d love to see a Bob Ross-style process video by Khoshroo… We find his method and resulting work equally intriguing.

Via salmankhoshroo.com

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