We’ve looked at double exposure photography many times before (here and here and here), but we’ve never seen analog work quite like this arresting series, Jarred & Displaced, by Finnish photographer Christoffer Relander. We often marvel at artists who choose more traditional or “old school” methods of art making, which is the case with Relander’s striking photos here. Rather than capturing his photos digitally, then quickly bringing them into Photoshop for manipulation, Relander takes to the dark room to work his magic. While each composite is brilliant by its own merits, Relander’s process somehow makes his work that much more precious. As if pouring his heart into these very personal photographs was not enough, Relander also collaborated with fellow Finnish photographer and filmmaker Anders Lönnfeldt on a simply exquisite short film about this project, which is a true work of art in and of itself. In his own words, Relander discusses this mysteriously beautiful ongoing project: “For over a year now I’ve been collecting landscapes in jars using analog double exposures—in this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, in the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.”

Via christofferrelander.com

relander-01 relander-02 relander-03 relander-04 relander-05 relander-06 relander-07 relander-08 relander-09 relander-10 relander-11 relander-12 relander-13 relander-14 relander-15

A lot has happened in the world since we last visited the quirky and thought-provoking work of Atlanta-based BBDO Creative Director Stephen McMennamy. Yet his steadfast #ComboPhotos project continues to churn out clever mashups and engage people around the globe. In fact, as cited in our previous post (here) back in September 2015, he had almost 50K Instagram followers… well, his following has ballooned to 226K and growing. And for good reason. His compositions, which are all comprised of original, thoughtfully captured photography (rather than stock images) are simple and fun. Their brilliance is in their subtlety, and also the purposeful absence of Photoshop blending tools. McMennamy’s work makes us do a double-take, which is a sure measure of something special in our minds. His work is as impressive as ever… can’t wait to check back in another 16 months to see what McMennamy has conjured up.

Via Instagram

mcmennamy-01 mcmennamy-21 mcmennamy-20 mcmennamy-19 mcmennamy-18 mcmennamy-17 mcmennamy-16 mcmennamy-15 mcmennamy-14 mcmennamy-13 mcmennamy-12 mcmennamy-11 mcmennamy-10 mcmennamy-09 mcmennamy-08 mcmennamy-07 mcmennamy-06 mcmennamy-05 mcmennamy-04 mcmennamy-03 mcmennamy-02

There’s “plenty” to love about the work of Argentinian designer/art director (and co-founder of Buenos Aires-based motion studio Plenty, and now at the helm of Playful studio) Pablo Alfieri. His vibrant and playful portfolio is crammed full of lighthearted designs that are heavy on conceptually and compositionally sound foundations. Though we don’t know him personally, we can safely deduce that Alfieri’s irreverent sense of humor shines through his fantastic designs. Be sure to peruse his robust portfolio, but we will simply leave you with a New Year greeting (yes, made from bendy straws). Hope you love Alfieri’s work as much as we do. Oh, and happy 2017 too!

Via Behance

alfieri-01 alfieri-02 alfieri-03 alfieri-04 alfieri-05

Israeli photographer Rubi Lebovitch has a sort of subversive sense of humor, and for the record, we love it. Though his photographs themselves are pretty straightforward, Lebovitch has the uncanny ability to find the absurd in the ordinary. There’s a great cerebral quality to his work, in which the viewer is not guided by a predetermined story arc, but instead can deduce any number of things from his unexpected and beautifully absurd work. For his series Home Sweet Home, Lebovitch utilizes an intimate domestic setting for a veritable fun house. There is a certain charm in Lebovitch’s hyperbole, and ironically enough, you too can display it in your own home in a tidy coffee table book (available here). In his own words, Lebovitch discusses his book: “My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images…characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meanings. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. My images do not contain a clear-cut story or plot. The characters are inscrutable to the viewers and difficult to identify; their relationship with the world around them is senseless and they fail to communicate. Rationality is substituted by a twisted and exaggerated worldview. I employ a multiplicity of objects, allowing the objects to grow stronger and take over reality; they occupy and control the space. The scenes depicted in the photographs emphasize what usually remains hidden: the repressed, which cannot be described. The anxiety these scenes arouse undermines the peacefulness and security usually associated with home.”

Via rubilebovitch.com and loeildelaphotographie.com

lebovich-01 lebovich-02 lebovich-03 lebovich-04 lebovich-05 lebovich-06 lebovich-07 lebovich-08 lebovich-09 lebovich-10 lebovich-11 lebovich-12 lebovich-13 lebovich-14 lebovich-15 lebovich-16 lebovich-17

It is said that art is often an honest reflection of societal issues at large. History shows that for centuries art has been a sort of barometer, documenting larger issues through the lens of the artist. This certainly holds true for the work of Italian artist Alessandro Rabatti. His series Facebank serves as commentary for the very uncertain financial state of the world today, with a humorous bent, of course. Rabatti alters iconic faces on currency (related posts here and here and here) from around the world, “disguising” them as fictional superheroes. Despite the seemingly fun nature of these pieces, Rabatti’s intent and message is likely much deeper. For one, by altering the faces of these historical figures to look like familiar comic book characters with a rich (albeit fictional) history of their own, Rabatti remarks on their economic and political status, looking to them as possible “saviors” of the global economic crisis. There is an implied trust in these figures, both real and fictional, so the dialogue Rabatti initiates with this series could really go on and on. Oh, and these works are just plain cool looking. From conception to execution, we’d say Rabatti has creative super powers of his own.

Via alessandrorabatti.com

rabatti-01 rabatti-02 rabatti-03 rabatti-04 rabatti-05 rabatti-06 rabatti-07 rabatti-08 rabatti-09 rabatti-10 rabatti-11 rabatti-12 rabatti-13 rabatti-14

We have a thing for series, as you might have noticed from many of our posts. And serial projects, in which artists produce artwork for a specified stretch of time, whether it be daily or weekly or monthly, are some of our favorites (here and here and here). We recently stumbled upon 36 Days of Type, a yearly open call inviting designers, illustrators and visual artists to share their view on the letters and numbers from our alphabet. Originally conceived by Barcelona-based designers Nina Sans and Rafa Goicoechea, this creative initiative has literally generated tens of thousands of entries, and is now in its third year. The work of Belgian designer Mario De Meyer caught our eye, and led us to a virtual treasure trove of typographic wonders. For the 2016 edition, De Meyer dove head first into his varying letterforms, producing a variety of beautiful designs, each worthy of standing on its own. De Meyer’s imagination seems boundless, integrating depth and a terrific sense of color into his compositions. We’re looking forward to seeing what De Meyer whips up for 2017!

Via Behance and 36daysoftype.com

demeyer-01 demeyer-02 demeyer-03 demeyer-04 demeyer-05 demeyer-06 demeyer-07 demeyer-08 demeyer-09 demeyer-10 demeyer-11 demeyer-12 demeyer-13 demeyer-14 demeyer-15 demeyer-16 demeyer-17 demeyer-18 demeyer-19 demeyer-20 demeyer-21 demeyer-22 demeyer-23 demeyer-24 demeyer-25 demeyer-26

Welp, UK designer/illustrator/artist Christopher LaBrooy has done it again. His mad CGI skills continue to amaze us. LaBrooy is a master manipulator, creating surreal digital compositions that defy logic and reason (previous posts here and here). Aptly titled simply 911, and set in what appears to be picturesque Palm Springs, LaBrooy pays homage to the iconic 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS in this incredible series. What we love most about LaBrooy’s work is that he elevates his adeptness in Maxon Cinema 4D beyond gratuitous rendering for the sake of rendering, to thoughtful and awe-inspiring artwork. Gearheads may shudder at the sight of a dozen otherwise pristine Porches partially submerged in a pool, but that’s precisely what LaBrooy seems to strive for: an emotional response to his digital work. As far as we’re concerned, mission accomplished (again).

Via chrislabrooy.com

labrooy-01 labrooy-02 labrooy-03 labrooy-04

One mint Porsche 911 Carrera RS #porsche #porsche911 #bendy #animation

A post shared by Chris Labrooy (@chrislabrooy) on

labrooy-05 labrooy-06

We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

dada-01 dada-14 dada-05

 

dada-13 dada-12 dada-11 dada-06

 

dada-10 dada-09 dada-08 dada-07  dada-04

 

dada-03

 

 

 

 

bdi_thanksgiving2016

It’s true that we’ve seen our fair share of movie posters through the years (here, here and here), but nothing quite like these. Manchester, UK-based designer/photographer/poster artist Jordan Bolton doesn’t rely on highly stylized shots from the film, or even the film’s actors. No effects-laden titles or much typography to speak of at all. Instead, for his Objects series, Bolton meticulously arranges prop elements from each film, paying careful attention to color palettes and composition to relay the film’s themes. For his Rooms series, Bolton applies that same attention to detail, focusing instead on recreating floor plans from keys scenes in the films. We cannot imagine how much close watching of these films Bolton does to be able to create these works. This is a true cinephile’s dream, and lucky for them Bolton sells prints here and here.

Via Tumblr and Facebook

bolton-01 bolton-02 bolton-03 bolton-04 bolton-05 bolton-06 bolton-07 bolton-08 bolton-09 bolton-10 bolton-11

%d bloggers like this: