Archives for posts with tag: Abbey Road Studios

We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

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The decorative art of mosaics dates back thousands of years, yet this art form never ceases to amaze us (here and here and here). Artists continue to find new ways to push boundaries, creating intricate photorealistic works with a variety of materials. One such master is British mosaic artist Ed Chapman. Influenced by artists like Chuck Close, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jamie Reid, Chapman works with a variety of materials to create some incredible pieces, often inspired by music, movies, and pop culture in general. One particularly notable piece is Chapman’s Jimi Hendrix portrait comprised of thousands of Fender guitar picks. It was auctioned off several years ago for £23,000 (over $37,000) at Abbey Road Studios in London as part of Cancer Research’s Sound & Vision fundraiser. Chapman also creates works commissioned by private art collectors and corporations from around the world.

Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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