Archives for posts with tag: abstract

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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Some “tree huggers” may view paper art (here and here and here) as a gratuitous use of precious paper. But Spanish paper artist Malena Valcárcel may just have found a way to please art lovers and environmentalists alike. Valcárcel “upcycles” discarded or recycled books into quite beautiful sculptures. She is astoundingly self-taught, and her work is intricate and delicate in a way that serves the fine print of her chosen medium (printed matter) really well. She even utilizes lighting in some of her pieces, which adds an entirely new magical dimension. In her own words, “My main inspirations come from nature and everyday life, and I often return to certain ideas again and again. Flowers, trees, butterflies, houses, clouds … without forgetting the sea, really fascinate me. Turning books into sculptures, cutting and shaping paper into different shapes or abstract forms never ceases to amaze me, and when the work is finished, just contemplating it brings a smile to my face. Making things has always been incredibly important to me and it is often an amazing release to get it out of my system. It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work…the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm.” Charming, indeed.

Via Behance and Etsy

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Food and color are two of our favorite things… combine that with very systematic arrangements, and we’re in seventh heaven. So when we stumbled upon the work of Seattle-based photographer/food fanatic Brittany Wright, we were immediately taken with her stunning compositions. Wright not only arranges fruit and vegetables in a spectrum that’s pleasing to the eye, but she also captures changes through the aging process, and sometimes cooking. Her approach is actually less like food photography, and more abstract. Wright’s terrific sense of color is clear in her very nuanced groupings. She has even branched out from fresh produce, and started exploring other types of foods too. Wright’s work appeals to us on a variety of levels, and if her growing number of Instagram followers is any indication, we’re not alone in that.

More orderly food photography here and here and here.

Via wrightkitchen.com and Instagram

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Aerial photography has always intrigued us. The vantage point from high above presents so many opportunities to see things differently. But, when you think about it, it’s still a relatively small portion of photography. The rise of Google Maps aside, aerial photography is often something one must seek out. One terrific aerial photographer worth knowing is Florida-based Bill Yates. From a young age, Yates combined his two passions, flying and photography, into a truly extraordinary body of work. Clearly a man with a plan, Yates didn’t approach these fascinations recreationally. His credentials include being a member of a U.S. Naval Aviation squadron, as well as earning an MFA Degree in Photography from Rhode Island School of Design, while studying with master fine art photographers. Not too shabby. And his work speaks for itself. With the recent sharp uptick in chatter about the proliferation of drones here in the U.S and around the world, some impact on aerial photography will surely be felt. But if the work of Yates is not evidence of the importance of creative human vision behind the lens, we’re not sure what is.

More aerial photography posts here and here.

Via billyatescypix.com

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Nashville-based sculpture Herb Williams never put down his crayons. His work in this unique medium (crayon sculptures) is awe-inspiring (previous post here). This commissioned piece, composed of about 25,000 crayons, took about two months to complete. In Williams’ own words, “The real fun of the portrait is in adding colors that aren’t really there to make it more interesting, almost like a Chuck Close when you’re right up to the portrait, it’s abstract, but from a distance it completely works.” It really does work on so many levels… we are thoroughly impressed. Be sure to check out more of his work here.

Via mymodernmet.com

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