Archives for posts with tag: aesthetic

Posters are some of our favorite, yet challenging, projects. Poster design is a marriage between visual aesthetic and the delivery of information, between textual and graphical elements… the very fundamentals of graphic design. It should come as no surprise, then, that an institution as important and influential as the New York Film Festival places great emphasis on this visual embodiment of its annual event. Festival organizers manage to recruit some truly respected artists and photographers year after year for its remarkable posters. Below is just a sampling, starting with this year’s by renowned sculptor Richard Serra.

Via nytimes.com

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Having a close relationship with marketing at ESPN, we see (and create ourselves) lots of sports-related designs. We recently came across the work of a young Texas-based designer by the name of Nick Bascus. His growing portfolio as a whole has a very nice aesthetic, and he has a clear grasp of graphic design fundamentals like color and typography. But the work that really shines is Bascus’s series of low-polygon illustrations and posters featuring some current NBA stars. These killer designs hit all the right notes, from composition to color choices. Bascus could easily expand on this series with great success, and we honestly hope to see his work on the pages of ESPN The Magazine (nudge, nudge… @espnmag) someday soon.

Via nickbascus.com

Denver-based artist Jaime Molina has a very specific aesthetic. Clearly influenced by folk art, Molina’s work seems to be part of a larger narrative, complete with characters and such. We love it all, but are really taken with his 3D sculpture work, which has a whimsical, yet rustic feel. We particularly love how Molina uses nails to form the hair of his bearded characters. Though the nails are of varying sizes and seem to be placed almost haphazardly, there’s also a uniformity that’s really intriguing. Some of these intricate pieces even open to reveal a sort of center “skull”. Awesome work, so imaginative.

Via cuttyup.com and Instagram

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Minimalism is often just the right treatment for getting to the essence of a visual identity (previous examples here and here and here). And that is precisely the case with Minneapolis-based designer/art director Tony Buckland’s project, Birds of Minnesota. You don’t have to be into ornithology or bird watching to appreciate this work, there’s an aesthetic appeal that stands on its own. Buckland’s objective is to “edit the defining characteristics of each bird down to the absolute minimum without losing the essence of the bird.” And he achieves that brilliantly. An ever-growing collection of prints available here.

Via birdsofminnesota.com

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The connection between mathematics and art dates back thousands of years. From cathedrals to ancient tilings to oriental rugs, mathematics have been fundamental in geometric designs that are now revered and often emulated. In honor of Common Core testing that is taking place here in New York State this week, we thought it fitting to look at the work of Iranian mathematical artist Hamid Naderi Yeganeh. These often delicately intricate works are quite remarkable, and more astounding is that Yeganeh writes computer programs based on mathematical equations to produce them. Though Yeganeh’s mathematical descriptions are way over our heads (example below), the aesthetic and conceptual allure of these works is certainly not lost on us. The results are stunning, and just proof that math can be beautiful.

Via mathematics.culturalspot.org

 

This first image shows 9,000 ellipses. For each k=1,2,3,…,9000 the foci of the k-th ellipse are:
A(k)+iB(k)+C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and
A(k)+iB(k)-C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and the eccentricity of the k-th ellipse is D(k), where
A(k)=sin(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
B(k)=cos(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
C(k)=(1/14)+(1/16)sin(10πk/9000),
D(k)=(49/50)-(1/7)(sin(10πk/9000))^4.

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At first glance, one might deduce that this series of vivid, eye-catching photos is for some high-brow fashion campaign, or conceptual art project. Much to our surprise and delight, they are actually part of a bold print and outdoor advertising campaign from a few years back, entitled Adaptation, for, of all things, Barcelona City Council. That’s right, government, more or less. Shot by acclaimed Spanish photographer Paco Peregrín, and art directed by London-based Conor Cronin, this campaign is so different from what we’d expect from anything remotely bureaucratic, that’s it’s certainly attention getting, and even slightly refreshing. Could you even imagine a campaign like this for your local city council? Perhaps Spaniards are more culturally and artistically evolved. Or maybe the aesthetic sophistication juxtaposed with a purpose, though noble, rather mundane, was exactly the point. Either way, we’re talking about it thousands of miles away, and that is impressive by any measure.

Via pacoperegrin.com and conorcronin.com

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