Archives for posts with tag: analog

We’ve looked at double exposure photography many times before (here and here and here), but we’ve never seen analog work quite like this arresting series, Jarred & Displaced, by Finnish photographer Christoffer Relander. We often marvel at artists who choose more traditional or “old school” methods of art making, which is the case with Relander’s striking photos here. Rather than capturing his photos digitally, then quickly bringing them into Photoshop for manipulation, Relander takes to the dark room to work his magic. While each composite is brilliant by its own merits, Relander’s process somehow makes his work that much more precious. As if pouring his heart into these very personal photographs was not enough, Relander also collaborated with fellow Finnish photographer and filmmaker Anders Lönnfeldt on a simply exquisite short film about this project, which is a true work of art in and of itself. In his own words, Relander discusses this mysteriously beautiful ongoing project: “For over a year now I’ve been collecting landscapes in jars using analog double exposures—in this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, in the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.”

Via christofferrelander.com

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Australian artist Guy Whitby, otherwise known as WorkByKnight (or WBK) has a terrific eye for mosaic compositions, which (and we know from experience) is much more difficult and time consuming than it looks. These pixelated portraits are deceivingly complex, and serve as visual commentary for the global shift from analog to digital. Each piece is made up of a variety of computer keys, along with analog and digital buttons. WBK meticulously places each button and key to serve as a pixel, if you will. Though subjects vary, from celebrities and artists to musicians and political figures, to his most recent “Old School Tech” series of still life technological treasures, the quality of this remarkable work never falters. Truly amazing how strategic color choice and placement make otherwise analogous objects and shapes into something cohesive, and more importantly, recognizable.

More mosaic posts here and here and here.

Via Behance

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Though relatively new on the scene of traditional film photography, German photographer Florian Imgrund creates masterful compositions the old school way. Imgrund got his first film camera just four years ago, and has been building an impressive body of work ever since. Employing double exposure techniques in the darkroom, Imgrund often merges beautiful landscapes with human forms… all without any computer manipulation. The results are incredible. Reminiscent of some other double exposure work here.

Via inthoughts.de

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New Jersey-based multidisciplinary designer and illustrator Michael Molloy has an incredible archive of illustrations that showcase not only his freehand skills, but also his Photoshop proficiency. What could easily turn into a gratuitous marriage of pencil and Photoshop, is actually really well balanced in Molloy’s care. His excellent drawing skills are only punctuated by the touch of digital flavor. In Malloy’s own words, “[my illustration work] speaks to the type of work I love the best. I enjoy working analog as much as possible, and then experiment with mixing in digital medium.” Well done.

Via madebymolloy.com and Facebook

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