Archives for posts with tag: animal photography

Resemblance is a funny thing (previous post here). Like the notion that cars have faces (here). Or the dog with a human face that has taken the internet by storm (here). Sort of along those lines, British photographer (and animal lover) Gerrard Gethings recently completed a series where he paired dogs and humans, and we absolutely love it. This series is so fun, in fact, that the concept actually derived from a commission by British publisher Laurence King Publishing for this brilliant little matching game (available here). Make no mistake, this was not an easy task. According to Gethings (and he would know based on his impressive portfolio), “taking pictures of animals is tricky in almost every way. I have never met one with even the slightest interest in photography.” Fortunately, we have a strong interest in this terrific and endearing series.

Via gerrardgethings.com and Instagram

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We’re not exactly sure of its origins, but perhaps you’ve heard of the folklore that claims dog owners begin to resemble their precious pooches over time. Hamburg, Germany-based freelance portrait, editorial and commercial photographer Ines Opifanti explores this notion in her ongoing series entitled The Dog People. While she’s not exactly sold on that claim, Opifanti does subscribe to the belief that owners become really good at interpreting their pets’ subtle mannerisms. We think Opifanti is really on to something with this… great series that could truly go on and on. It should be noted that these are authentic pairings of pet and owner, not models. Strong concept aside, Opifanti is clearly a very skilled photographer. Really nice shots. We love this all around.

More pet portraiture posts here and here.

Via ines-opifanti.com

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Snakes get a bad rap. And they have throughout history. Perhaps it’s their cold-blooded, slithering and hissing disposition, but snakes have long been feared and associated with evil. London-based photographer Andrew McGibbon attempts to change that perception with his compelling series, cleverly named Slitherstition. By photographing his serpentine subjects from overhead and on brightly colored backgrounds, McGibbon is able to capture them in a vulnerable state, and emphasize their inherent beauty and grace. McGibbon has a terrific sense of color, paring the reptiles with interesting, vivid background colors to compliment their almost graphic exteriors. McGibbon is also quite the articulate wordsmith, explaining this project in more depth: “While a great many species of animals are subject to projections of man’s metaphorical thinking, I don’t see another – not even venomous counterparts, like spiders or scorpions; or sharks which hide in murky depths, waiting (as the horror movies have us think) to rip us apart, which is thought of as so deadly and demonic. The snake is insidious, while the serpent is all-mighty and terrifying. From ancient symbols to pop culture and schlock horror, from Medusa to Freud, the snake is a single unifier, a common enemy unanimously held in hideous regard – it is, everyone agrees, evil. These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look, beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.”

Another snake-related post here.

Via andrewmcgibbon.co

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One sign of a gifted photographer is finding beauty in mundane, everyday subjects. Take popular aquarium “betta” fish (otherwise known as Siamese fighting fish), for example. Sure, they’re lovely domestic pets, but Thai photographer Visarute Angkatavanich captures them in all their beauty and elegance like we’ve never seen before, despite their rather aggressive nature (hence their name). Through Angkatavanich’s lens, they look exotic and mysterious. A commercial photographer by trade, Angkatavanich decided to experiment with shooting these colorful cold-blooded vertebrates a few years ago on a whim. And the results are truly stunning. We love how they appear to be suspended in air, the water they are submerged in not even apparent. It’s like they’re wearing luxurious, flowing gowns.

More fish posts here and here. And creative animal photography here and here

Via 500px.com

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Animal photography is often seen as cute and sometimes kitschy (and we have featured such works, which we feel do have a place). But London-based photographer Tim Flach takes an entirely different approach. Using principles of human portraiture, Flach’s highly conceptual work is informed by his concerns with anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism. Directly from his artist’s statement, Flach says his “interests lie in the way humans shape animals, and shape their meaning. Whether genetically, as with the featherless chicken, or with the symbolism that gives a special significance to a dove but dismisses a London pigeon as a flying rat. His images aim to promote discussion and encourage debate.” While there is clearly a cerebral mission at work here, we cannot dismiss the artistic value. Flach presents his animal subjects in unusual ways that genuinely engage the viewer. We love the intimacy he achieves, and the studio setting really brings the subjects forth. There should be no debate about how incredible Flach’s work is.

Via timflach.com

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