Archives for posts with tag: animal

You may recognize Perler beads from your childhood. or perhaps your children (or you) enjoy these tactile “pixels” today, whose novelty bucks the digital trend. One thing is for sure, these tiny fusible plastic beads have an appeal that transcends age and skill level. Romanian artist Claudiu Alexandru takes beading to a whole new level, having spent some 85 hours and 45,000 beads with little more than a pair of tweezers (and lots of patience) on his latest masterpiece. The result is quite something.

Via Facebook

We feel one of our fundamental responsibilities as designers is to employ our creative resources to help communicate and disseminate messages for public good, when possible. The right visuals can be powerful and in this instance, also quite beautiful. Commissioned by German environmental advocacy group Robin Wood, ad agency Grabarz & Partner collaborated with some clearly talented folks from Berlin to Bangkok to create this compelling series of advertisements illustrating the destruction of nature and wildlife around the world. Anchored by a clever concept, the execution here is spot-on. With the use of double exposure (other examples here and here), these compelling ads feature an animal and its natural habitat threatened by destruction. We love the composition and endless details of each piece. Just excellent all around.

Via Behance

grabarz-01 grabarz-02 grabarz-03 grabarz-04 grabarz-05 grabarz-06 grabarz-07 grabarz-08

It’s been a while since we featured the work of Los Angeles-based design and illustration studio DKNG (previous posts here and here). Since we had just looked at some stellar minimalist bird illustrations, we thought DKNG’s dog breed illustrations a fitting followup. Design duo Dan Kuhlken and Nathan Goldman were commissioned by Golden Doodle “lifestyle brand for dog lovers” to illustrate ten of their favorite dog breeds, which were eventually used for some rad swag aimed at dog lovers. The results are terrific! We love DKNG’s bold, clean style.

Via dkngstudios.com

DKNG-01 DKNG-02 DKNG-03 DKNG-04 DKNG-05 DKNG-06 DKNG-07 DKNG-08 DKNG-09 DKNG-10 DKNG-11 DKNG-12 DKNG-13 DKNG-14 DKNG-15

It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

Borsi-01 Borsi-02 Borsi-03 Borsi-04 Borsi-05 Borsi-06

We’re not exactly sure of its origins, but perhaps you’ve heard of the folklore that claims dog owners begin to resemble their precious pooches over time. Hamburg, Germany-based freelance portrait, editorial and commercial photographer Ines Opifanti explores this notion in her ongoing series entitled The Dog People. While she’s not exactly sold on that claim, Opifanti does subscribe to the belief that owners become really good at interpreting their pets’ subtle mannerisms. We think Opifanti is really on to something with this… great series that could truly go on and on. It should be noted that these are authentic pairings of pet and owner, not models. Strong concept aside, Opifanti is clearly a very skilled photographer. Really nice shots. We love this all around.

More pet portraiture posts here and here.

Via ines-opifanti.com

Opifanti-01 Opifanti-02 Opifanti-03 Opifanti-04 Opifanti-05 Opifanti-06 Opifanti-07 Opifanti-08 Opifanti-09 Opifanti-10 Opifanti-11

There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

Dana-01 Dana-02 Dana-03 Dana-04 Dana-05 Dana-06 Dana-07 Dana-08 Dana-09 Dana-10 Dana-11 Dana-12

Super-realistic art has a way of making the impossible seem possible. It can be mind-bending and beautiful all at the same time. The work of French artist Daniel Firman embodies those very qualities. His series featuring balancing elephants is particularly intriguing. Firman consulted an actual taxidermist to achieve impactful authenticity. We imagine seeing one of these pieces in person would give one pause… just incredible.

More realistic artwork here and here and here.

Via danielfirman.com

Firman-1 Firman-2 Firman-3 Firman-4 Firman-5 Firman-6 Firman-7 Firman-8 Firman-9

Snakes get a bad rap. And they have throughout history. Perhaps it’s their cold-blooded, slithering and hissing disposition, but snakes have long been feared and associated with evil. London-based photographer Andrew McGibbon attempts to change that perception with his compelling series, cleverly named Slitherstition. By photographing his serpentine subjects from overhead and on brightly colored backgrounds, McGibbon is able to capture them in a vulnerable state, and emphasize their inherent beauty and grace. McGibbon has a terrific sense of color, paring the reptiles with interesting, vivid background colors to compliment their almost graphic exteriors. McGibbon is also quite the articulate wordsmith, explaining this project in more depth: “While a great many species of animals are subject to projections of man’s metaphorical thinking, I don’t see another – not even venomous counterparts, like spiders or scorpions; or sharks which hide in murky depths, waiting (as the horror movies have us think) to rip us apart, which is thought of as so deadly and demonic. The snake is insidious, while the serpent is all-mighty and terrifying. From ancient symbols to pop culture and schlock horror, from Medusa to Freud, the snake is a single unifier, a common enemy unanimously held in hideous regard – it is, everyone agrees, evil. These images, then, are a result of my attempts to break down our suppositions of the animal. As with all victims of an ‘othering’ process, the serpent deserves a second look, beyond its slithering and dark hypnosis.”

Another snake-related post here.

Via andrewmcgibbon.co

McGibbon-01 McGibbon-02 McGibbon-03 McGibbon-04 McGibbon-05 McGibbon-06 McGibbon-07 McGibbon-08 McGibbon-09 McGibbon-10 McGibbon-11 McGibbon-12 McGibbon-13 McGibbon-14

A quick shoutout to one of out favorite graffiti artists around, ROA. It’s been a while since we posted (here) about this wildly talented Belgian artist. His signature black and white large-scale works featuring animals, often of the scavenger variety, are visually arresting. Some find ROA’s work grotesque, but he cites his fascination with the circle of life, and the beauty in the rhythm of life and death, as his inspiration. We are particularly taken with his imaginative use of space (lenticular rabbit!), and how that advances his art to another level, as exhibited in the particular works below. Be sure to check out the video too. And look out for ROA’s work near you… our Rochester studio has the distinct privilege of being just a mile and a half from one of his murals.

Via Flickr

ROA-01 ROA-02 ROA-03 ROA-04 ROA-05 ROA-06 ROA-07 ROA-08 ROA-09 ROA-10 ROA-11 ROA-12 ROA-13 ROA-14 ROA-15 ROA-16 ROA-17 ROA-18 ROA-19

One sign of a gifted photographer is finding beauty in mundane, everyday subjects. Take popular aquarium “betta” fish (otherwise known as Siamese fighting fish), for example. Sure, they’re lovely domestic pets, but Thai photographer Visarute Angkatavanich captures them in all their beauty and elegance like we’ve never seen before, despite their rather aggressive nature (hence their name). Through Angkatavanich’s lens, they look exotic and mysterious. A commercial photographer by trade, Angkatavanich decided to experiment with shooting these colorful cold-blooded vertebrates a few years ago on a whim. And the results are truly stunning. We love how they appear to be suspended in air, the water they are submerged in not even apparent. It’s like they’re wearing luxurious, flowing gowns.

More fish posts here and here. And creative animal photography here and here

Via 500px.com

Angkatavanich-1 Angkatavanich-2 Angkatavanich-3 Angkatavanich-4 Angkatavanich-5 Angkatavanich-6 Angkatavanich-7 Angkatavanich-8

%d bloggers like this: