Archives for posts with tag: animals

The old adage “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” is taken to the hilt by Portuguese street artist Artur Bordalo (aka Bordalo II). Bordalo is a master of mixed media, and his work not only repurposes/recycles “garbage”, but also transforms urban landscapes in really intriguing ways. Bordalo sees the world through a different lens, and uses his bare hands to help us see what he sees through figurative painting. Bordalo combs the streets of Lisbon for discarded items, turning them into large scale thought-provoking compositions. In his own words, his artwork “is not only a way to recycle, but also a critique of the world we live in, where we often have nice things, which are based on junk without realizing it.” We particularly love his bird and insect works, as well as his train track transformations, featured below.

More street art posts here and here and here.

Via bordalosegundo.com and Instagram

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We are the first to admit that snakes in the wild and snakes in a controlled setting like a zoo, or through the lens of a talented photographer are two entirely different experiences. We certainly don’t love snakes in the way some people have them as pets. But we do recognize their undeniable beauty and mystique, especially when Italian photographer Guido Mocafico is involved. For his book Serpens, published several years ago, Mocafico captured a variety of snakes, including vipers and cobras, in these stunning photos. We have always found the vivid colors, remarkable patterns and graceful movements of these creatures beautiful and creatively inspiring. Mocafico shares a similar sentiment: “I have always been terrified by these reptiles, but I also find them terribly fascinating. I felt a sort of repulsion-attraction for these living creatures…. If I had to define beauty, I’d say it has to contain an element of darkness or danger.”

Via guidomocafico.com and hamiltonsgallery.com

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A quick shoutout to one of out favorite graffiti artists around, ROA. It’s been a while since we posted (here) about this wildly talented Belgian artist. His signature black and white large-scale works featuring animals, often of the scavenger variety, are visually arresting. Some find ROA’s work grotesque, but he cites his fascination with the circle of life, and the beauty in the rhythm of life and death, as his inspiration. We are particularly taken with his imaginative use of space (lenticular rabbit!), and how that advances his art to another level, as exhibited in the particular works below. Be sure to check out the video too. And look out for ROA’s work near you… our Rochester studio has the distinct privilege of being just a mile and a half from one of his murals.

Via Flickr

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Australian-born, Boston-based designer Dan Fleming has a very keen sense of typography and form. In this series, Word Animals, Flemming pushes the boundaries of letterforms to achieve illustrative representations of animals using the letters in their names. Some certainly work better than others, but we love the series as a whole. Licensing the designs to a kids’ clothing company wouldn’t be a bad idea… seems like the perfect audience for these fun, thoughtful designs. Vaguely reminiscent of another set of animal illustrations (here).

Via danflemingdesign.com

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Animal photography is often seen as cute and sometimes kitschy (and we have featured such works, which we feel do have a place). But London-based photographer Tim Flach takes an entirely different approach. Using principles of human portraiture, Flach’s highly conceptual work is informed by his concerns with anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism. Directly from his artist’s statement, Flach says his “interests lie in the way humans shape animals, and shape their meaning. Whether genetically, as with the featherless chicken, or with the symbolism that gives a special significance to a dove but dismisses a London pigeon as a flying rat. His images aim to promote discussion and encourage debate.” While there is clearly a cerebral mission at work here, we cannot dismiss the artistic value. Flach presents his animal subjects in unusual ways that genuinely engage the viewer. We love the intimacy he achieves, and the studio setting really brings the subjects forth. There should be no debate about how incredible Flach’s work is.

Via timflach.com

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Yes, we know, we know… animals taking on human characteristics is a bit gimmicky. It’s a practice that’s been around forever, and one that never ceases to rouse wonderment in the eyes of children the world over (and those young at heart, too). But this series by Barcelona-based photographer/filmmaker Yago Partal is somehow different. Partal captures the essence and perceived “personalities” of various animals through a fusion of photography and illustration in a really special way. His execution of this series, which began as just a few photos for a larger project, is flawless. In his own words, Partal comments in the third person: “Influenced since childhood by stories of wildlife, fashion and cartoons, he found his own voice in a game that many like to play: humanizing animals. The project, with no other pretentiousness than to have fun and set apart his work, tries to do something different….” The pairing of wardrobe with animal is both humorous and thought-provoking. We really love this ongoing series. Merch featuring these fantastic photos available here. This series brings to mind another collection of stellar artwork that depicts the humanization of animals (here).

Via zooportraits.com

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Fashion draws inspiration from a wide array or sources. And art certainly draws from fashion in much the same way. This cyclical phenomenon is evident in this terrific series by French duo Thomas Couderc and Clément Vauchez, otherwise known as Helmo. Aptly titled “Bêtes de mode” (Fashion Animals), each piece depicts a fashion model in blue, with a thematically complimentary animal superimposed in red. The series has been on display in the windows of iconic upscale Paris department store Galeries Lafayette on Hausmann Boulevard. To capitalize on the duotone effect, the installation featured colored gels to reveal just the model portrait or animal portrait, depending on which one the viewer looked through. This technique is sort of reminiscent of those old school 3D glasses, with the red and blue lenses. Just brilliant. Get the full effect through the video below..

Via helmo.fr

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Japanese sculptor Tomohiro Inaba’s unique approach is striking. Some of his work, consisting of steel wires of varying densities, almost looks like it’s moving. The subject matter of many of these pieces is animals… they start off in full form then dissolve into a tangled web of wire. Inaba achieves an awesome impression of movement, like an organic form transforming into a digitally knotted mass.

Via tomohiro-inaba.com

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These are not your average hermit crab shells you’d find, say, on the boardwalk at the Jersey shore. Japanese artist Aki Inomata created this series of intricate clear plastic cityscapes, in part, as commentary on human adaptation and migration. “The hermit crabs wearing the shelters I built for them, which imitate the architecture of various countries, appeared to be crossing various national borders. Though the body of the hermit crab is the same, according to the shell it is wearing, its appearance changes completely. It’s as if they were asking, ‘Who are you?'”

Via aki-inomata.com and art-is.com

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