Archives for posts with tag: Apple

Photo manipulation, we’re talking done really well, is a skill unto itself. With the proliferation of Photoshop use, the average viewer seems to take manipulated photos for granted these days. Photo manipulation software is literally everywhere, including on cheap or even free apps on phones in people’s pockets. But the upper crust of Photoshop users still have it on lockdown, and we take notice when we see greatness. Enter Australia-based photographer/designer Anthony Hearsey. He takes on a variety of clients and projects, but it’s these beautifully surreal images that caught our attention. Hearsey’s work is seamless, allowing his twisted concepts to really shine. We will surely continue to follow him and look forward to seeing what he comes up with next.

Via Behance

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With the latest Apple releases, so too will come the flood of YouTube videos of folks “testing” the new devices in all sorts of precarious scenarios (submerging your new iPhone in a vat of soda, then freezing it for 12 hours, anyone?). New Zealand-born, Brooklyn-based photographer/artist Henry Hargreaves (whose stellar work we’ve discussed here and here) takes a more cerebral approach to a practice that is no less cringe-inducing to us gadget geeks. Hargreaves, along with his stylist partner Caitlin Levin, whose incredible collaborations almost always employ food as the medium, juxtaposes said electronic devices with fast food in their series Deep Fried Gadgets. While we do shudder slightly at the sight of intentionally defacing these gizmos that we hold in such high regard, we certainly appreciate the concept and commentary, not to mention the fascinatingly engaging visuals. In Hargreaves’s own words, “I like to play with food and the juxtaposition of different worlds. I found a video of some Japanese kids trying to deep fry a PSP and eat it, it didn’t work and they made a mess of it, but I loved the idea and thought it could be expanded and photographed in a beautiful way. Electronics have become almost a holy device, the way a new apple device sends people out of their minds. But as soon as the next model comes out the last is immediately forgotten. This is a commentary about the similarities between tech culture and fast food. Quickly devoured and then discarded because of our appetite for the newest product.”

Via hargreavesandlevin.com

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In case you’re not aware, there’s a new niche of photography on the rise, “smartphone photography”. With Apple’s recent announcement of yet more improvements to the already outstanding iPhone camera, this new brand of photography should come as no surprise. Though smartphone cameras don’t (yet) rival the quality of digital SLRs, they have come a long way, and there’s something to be said for their accessibility and convenience. So, it’s no wonder visual artists are compelled to simply reach in their pocket when it’s time to capture some creative brilliance. New Jersey-based visual artist/photographer/college student Adam Hillman is a perfect example. While the quality of his conceptual thinking and execution are rooted in traditional visual art as we know it, part of what defines Hillman’s work is his use of his smartphone. For one, his photos are unedited… what you see is what you get. And with a broadcast vehicle (the great big internet) basically integrated into his tool of choice (smartphone), the accessibility of his work is a key part of its appeal. Hillman’s appreciation for modern art is clear, and his use of color and order are a real draw for us (see previous posts here and here and here). We will be interested to see how Hillman’s work evolves over time. From the look of it, he will be making a name for himself well beyond these early works.

Via Instagram

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It’s a wonder we’ve never come across another photographer doing this, or perhaps it’s just never been done so well. We’re all familiar with Australian photographer Anne Geddes’s ubiquitous photos of sleeping babies. But Southern California-based photographer Laura Izumikawa takes a slightly edgier approach. What we imagine started off as the new mother’s inability to rest while her newborn daughter, Joey Marie, sleeps, Izumikawa channeled her stellar photography skills into a growing series that we just can’t get enough of. From Beyoncé to Pikachu to Sia to Cinderella, Izumikawa photographs her adorable (and cooperative) daughter in various states of costumed slumber. Not sure how long these brilliant cosplay (yes, a contraction of the words costume and play) photos can/will continue, but we urge Izumikawa to keep snapping a dozing Joey as long as she can. Brings a huge smile to our faces!

If you love these photos, check out a previous playful post (here).

Via Instagram

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The talent coming out of Savannah College of Art and Design is quite remarkable. And the work of SCAD senior Weston Doty, currently studying Graphic Design and Photography, is particularly notable. We’re especially taken with Doty’s project titled Split, which he describes as “observation & experimentation of form + color”. We admit that we have an affinity for food-related design (as evidenced here and here and here), but Doty’s keen sense of color and composition are what really draw us to this series. Doty exhibits an air of design maturity in his work, and we imagine he will be making his mark in the design community for years to come (his terrific name can’t hurt either).

Via Behance

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Chinese sculptor Li Lihong juxtaposes contemporary corporate logos with traditional Chinese imagery and ceramic techniques, with fantastic results. The series is a sculptural mashup of corporate identity and fine art, of contemporary and traditional, of East and West, of old and new. Western business has become integrated into Chinese culture, and Lihong’s work seems to embrace it.

Via Facebook

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No, we’re not referring to the fantastical omnipresent electronic devices that have been embedded in our very culture. We’re referring to Apple’s short-lived clothing line from the mid-’80s. You can be sure knockoffs are just around the corner at your local Urban Outfitters.

Via mashable.com

With so many apps out there, icon design is something we increasingly take for granted. Some are certainly much better than others, and these, by Netherlands-based designer Julian Burford, fall into that category. The 3D perspective and uniformity among these hypothetical food product icons is great, especially while meeting Apple’s icon guidelines.

Via julianburford.nl

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