Archives for posts with tag: appreciation

When done well, reimagining movie posters (here and here and here) never gets old. Movie poster design presents a unique challenge to designers… it’s usually one of the first representations of a movie people see, so there’s a tall order to embody an often complex story with a single image. French designer and illustrator Flore Maquin is clearly up to that challenge. Maquin has a knack for designing movie posters extraordinarily well. We love her bold style, which is evident throughout her pieces. And she has a clear appreciation for typography. But it’s her genuine esteem for cinema that really shines through here. These creations feel like a labor of love, and that’s what makes them truly special. Well done.

Via flore-maquin.com

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Traditional painterly techniques combined with a modern graphic sensibility makes for some very compelling work. American-born, Berlin-based artist James Bullough’s body of work is the perfect example of this striking juxtaposition. Bullough has a penchant for realism, but also employs a masterful geometric style that sort of fractures his compositions. And his sense of composition is at the heart of what makes his work so effective. Not only does Bullough produce more standard size paintings and drawings, but he also works in a much larger scale to create killer murals. Bullough cites a wide range of artistic influences, and adapts them beautifully. His notable technical skill paired with his appreciation for urban graffiti converge in a perfect storm. We are in awe.

Via jamesbullough.com

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Full disclosure: we’re having a moment of design envy. And for several reasons. The subject of our aspirational glares is Big Apple-based designer/illustrator José Guizar’s self-initiated, ongoing weekly project Windows of New York. First, we are truly inspired by “daily” projects. We admire the commitment of artists who hone their craft through some sort of consistent work, whether it be daily, weekly, monthly (for example, here and here and here). It truly is a creative exercise, to motivate one’s self to conjure creativity for the sake of it, and at regular intervals, no less. Second, with distractions aplenty, from our Apple i-devices, to social media, to everyday hustle and bustle, being mindful enough to stop and appreciate architectural details around us is easier said than done. Such inquisitiveness and passion are what drives Guizar. Finally, his incredible illustration skills really make this project what it is. In the hands of a less-skilled artist, this undertaking wouldn’t be quite so notable. But Guizar’s spare, yet detailed design approach is perfectly engaging. From his flat style, to his terrific sense of color and composition, to his attention to typography, Guizar’s growing collection of diverse architectural specimens reflects his personal spirit of curiosity and exploration, and should be cherished and admired by designers for quite sometime. Hats off to Guizar for a well-conceived and expertly executed personal project.

Via windowsofnewyork.com

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Long-term, intricate, handmade projects are not what we’re accustomed to at Barbour. But when we see such undertakings, we have a certain appreciation for them all the more. A superb example is this absolutely remarkable piece by Beauty & the Beast, a still production house, specialized in Ad Photography, Craft, CGI and Post-Production in the Eastern European country of Moldova. The project, entitled I Will Maintain, was inspired by Russian illustrator Ivan Belikov’s personal work interpreting various coats of arms (an intriguing series worthy of a post all its own). The folks at Beauty & the Beast spent a laborious six months planning, designing and producing this fine interpretation of the Netherlands coat of arms. And they did a fantastic job documenting the process. It should be noted that the hundreds of individual pieces were not crafted with a laser cutter or any type of machinery, but by hand. The multi-level assembly is just astounding, adding depth to an already complex work of art. We are truly in awe.

More papercraft posts here and here and here.

Via beautyandthebeast.eu

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