Archives for posts with tag: art

We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

huckins-01 huckins-02 huckins-03 huckins-04 huckins-05 huckins-06 huckins-07 huckins-08 huckins-09 huckins-10 huckins-11

Advertisements

We feature fan art (here and here and here) from time to time… we are all about equal opportunity, and certainly feel there’s a place for such creativity. While some in the art community discount fan art because it is based on someone else’s original content, we are from the camp that believes fan art, though not necessarily a complete original expression of the artist because it is derived from already existing content, is a creative expression nonetheless. Fan artists add their own individual style, which is intrinsically expressive and unique. One such case is that of Montreal-based artist Dada, who has a clear penchant for Disney stories in particular. She draws familiar Disney characters not necessarily to mimic them exactly, but to present them in new and distinctive ways. Dada’s latest series merges beloved Disney heroes with their often maligned counterparts. Her drawing skills are impressive, and we love the process videos she often posts on social media. This nod to a very open and unfettered process of art making is certainly in the spirit of Disney, and just reinforces the sense that we all share a love and admiration for their wondrous storytelling. What fun it is to see these clear juxtapositions of good versus evil. Well done.

Via Instagram

dada-01 dada-14 dada-05

 

dada-13 dada-12 dada-11 dada-06

 

dada-10 dada-09 dada-08 dada-07  dada-04

 

dada-03

 

 

 

 

We’ve seen art created from a wide variety of media, but nothing quite like this. As a matter of fact, if you had to guess how these were created just by looking at them, you’d probably have a hard time figuring it out. Relying on little more than brown packing tape, an Xacto and the filtering of light behind a translucent surface, Amsterdam-based artist Max Zorn’s work is awe-inspiring. The nuance in shading he achieves by layering tape is astounding all on its own. Never mind Zorn’s ability to manipulate the tape so intricately. It’s interesting how these works, composed of such an unexpected and artless material, are so beautiful. Zorn clearly has a penchant for the past, as indicated by his choice of subjects for the majority of his work. Interestingly, Zorn’s fondness for packing tape began as street art, as he describes in his own words: “There’s a lot of great street art by day, but it disappears after dark. I wanted to come up with urban art that uses nighttime as a setting, and there was nothing more inviting than the street lamps in Amsterdam. In the beginning I used packing tape to fill in larger sections of my marker drawings. Once I hung them on street lamps, the light’s effect opened up new ideas with ditching markers and just using tape.”

Via maxzorn.com and YouTube

zorn-01 zorn-02 zorn-03 zorn-04 zorn-05 zorn-06 zorn-07 zorn-08 zorn-09 zorn-10 zorn-11 zorn-12 zorn-13 zorn-14 zorn-15

Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

ButcherBilly-01A ButcherBilly-01B ButcherBilly-02 ButcherBilly-03 ButcherBilly-04 ButcherBilly-05 ButcherBilly-06 ButcherBilly-07 ButcherBilly-08 ButcherBilly-09 ButcherBilly-10 ButcherBilly-11 ButcherBilly-12 ButcherBilly-13 ButcherBilly-14 ButcherBilly-15 ButcherBilly-16 ButcherBilly-17 ButcherBilly-18 ButcherBilly-19 ButcherBilly-20 ButcherBilly-21 ButcherBilly-22 ButcherBilly-23 ButcherBilly-24 ButcherBilly-25 ButcherBilly-26 ButcherBilly-27

Paper craft, using paper as the primary artistic medium for the creation of three-dimensional objects, is a highly specialized expression of one’s creativity. Though we don’t create this type of art ourselves, we certainly admire those who do (here and here and here). Milan-based artist Mauro Seresini is no exception. With little more than X-Acto knives and stockpiles of Bristol board, Seresini’s work ranges from editorial to advertising to commissions to large and small scale installations, and has attracted such luxury brands as Valentino, Tod’s and Lavazza. There is a certain unmistakable elegance to Seresini’s work, which clearly drew these clients to him. And the fact that Seresini is self-taught only heightens our affinity for his work. A true artist, through and through.

Via mauroseresini.com and Behance

Seresini-01 Seresini-02 Seresini-03 Seresini-04 Seresini-05 Seresini-06 Seresini-07 Seresini-08 Seresini-09 Seresini-10 Seresini-11 Seresini-12 Seresini-13 Seresini-14 Seresini-15 Seresini-16 Seresini-17 Seresini-18 Seresini-19

The connection between mathematics and art dates back thousands of years. From cathedrals to ancient tilings to oriental rugs, mathematics have been fundamental in geometric designs that are now revered and often emulated. In honor of Common Core testing that is taking place here in New York State this week, we thought it fitting to look at the work of Iranian mathematical artist Hamid Naderi Yeganeh. These often delicately intricate works are quite remarkable, and more astounding is that Yeganeh writes computer programs based on mathematical equations to produce them. Though Yeganeh’s mathematical descriptions are way over our heads (example below), the aesthetic and conceptual allure of these works is certainly not lost on us. The results are stunning, and just proof that math can be beautiful.

Via mathematics.culturalspot.org

 

This first image shows 9,000 ellipses. For each k=1,2,3,…,9000 the foci of the k-th ellipse are:
A(k)+iB(k)+C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and
A(k)+iB(k)-C(k)e^(300πik/9000)
and the eccentricity of the k-th ellipse is D(k), where
A(k)=sin(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
B(k)=cos(12πk/9000)cos(8πk/9000),
C(k)=(1/14)+(1/16)sin(10πk/9000),
D(k)=(49/50)-(1/7)(sin(10πk/9000))^4.

Yeganeh-01Yeganeh-02 Yeganeh-03Yeganeh-06 Yeganeh-04 Yeganeh-05  Yeganeh-07 Yeganeh-08 Yeganeh-09 Yeganeh-10Yeganeh-11

It wasn’t long ago we featured the work of Hungarian photographer/artist Flora Borsi. Once again, Borsi brings a certain edginess to the art of digital manipulation. While retouching can sometimes be seen as gratuitous, Borsi elevates photo-manipulation to an art form. Her work is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. In her latest series of self-portraits she calls Animeyed, Borsi poses with animals in such a way that they seem to share an eye. Her work has an interesting way of coming across as playful, but also slightly uncomfortable at the same time. Creative, clever and captivating. Once again, we love it.

Via floraborsi.com

Borsi-01 Borsi-02 Borsi-03 Borsi-04 Borsi-05 Borsi-06

California-based artist and teacher Russell Powell gives new meaning to the term “hand painted.” Inspiring his young students and tens of thousands of Instagram followers, Powell has mastered the art of hand stamping, which is way more difficult than it sounds. We’re not talking elementary finger painting… Powell operates on a much higher artistic level. In short, he expertly paints (usually a portrait) on the palm of his hand, but does so rather quickly so it doesn’t dry. Then transfers it to paper or some other surface for preservation. It really is brilliant, and executed masterfully by Powell. Saying nothing of his stellar painting skills, conceptually it just works so well. The inevitable prints of his fingers and palm become an integral part of his work, making every single piece truly unique. One word: badass.

Via Instagram

Powell-01

Powell-02

Powell-03

Powell-04 Powell-05

🙏🏼 #handstamp #create #facepaint #mlk #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends #u2

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

Powell-06 Powell-07

Powell-08

This one got away from me.. #handstamp #create #adele #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends @adele

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

Powell-09 Powell-10

#handstamp #facepaint #create #michaeljackson #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

Powell-11 Powell-12 Powell-13 Powell-14 Powell-15 Powell-16

#handstamp #facepaint #bodypaint #create #audreyhepburn #pangaeanstudios #wherethesidewalkchalkends

A post shared by Russell Powell (@pangaeanstudios) on

Powell-17 Powell-18 Powell-19 Powell-20

Art with purpose and for social good can be really powerful. It can bring people together in unique ways that’s really touching, especially in this digitally connected, yet ironically isolating society we live in today. The work of Germen Crew, a Mexican youth organization comprised of muralists and street artists, to literally transform a village is a prime example. The government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself resulted in this magnificent mural, Mexico’s largest. Launched as an effort to not only rehabilitate the hillside neighborhood, but to also bring the community together, the Germen Crew project was a massive undertaking involving the painting of 209 individual houses. And the photos speak for themselves. Be sure to check out the video below (in Spanish). The vibrant, fluid composition seen from afar is truly awe-inspiring and heart warming. Just amazing.

Via Facebook and Instagram

GermenCrew-01 GermenCrew-02 GermenCrew-03 GermenCrew-04 GermenCrew-05 GermenCrew-06 GermenCrew-07 GermenCrew-08 GermenCrew-09 GermenCrew-10 GermenCrew-11 GermenCrew-12 GermenCrew-13 GermenCrew-14

%d bloggers like this: