Archives for posts with tag: authentic

You must admit, the “pumpkin spice” phenomenon that has taken over in recent years may be getting bit out of hand. We find premature pumpkin spicing particularly offensive (as does this guy)… we do not need pumpkin spiced anything in August! In any case, with the autumnal flavors creeping in, so do all the colors, textures and visuals of the season. We love food-related typography (here and here and here), so when UK designer Daniel Coleman pulled back the curtain on his process for this fittingly delicious take on pumpkin spiced typography, we were immediately intrigued. In his own words, Coleman discusses the project: “Esquires’ Pumpkin Spice Latte is the coffee chain’s hero product for Autumn 2016. We were asked to produce a key visual that captured the Esquires brand points of being artisan and handmade, whilst conveying the products ingredients as authentic (and not just a syrup shot). We designed a visual that captured those standpoints, with a particular focus on the authentic ingredients. By creating the type out of cinnamon, we could emphasise the flavour in the latte. To further set the mood, we added leaves and key ingredients around the typography. We experimented with various ingredients, looking at what gave the greatest clarity, colour and perception of flavour. Given the nature of the product we decided to work with cinnamon. The type was created by adjusting a font named ‘Beyond the Mountains’, making sure it had no complete bowls, eyes or loops. The next step was to laser cut it out onto card to create our stencil. The final result took a few experiments, using varying amounts of cinnamon to ensure the best detail and legibility.”

Via Behance

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Few automotive designs are as iconic as the Volkswagen Beetle. Dubbed the “people’s car”, Volkswagen has gone on to produce some 22 million units, making the Beetle the longest-running and most-manufactured car of a single platform in history. Indonesian sculptor Ichwan Noor capitalizes on the Beetle’s recognizability with his striking Beetle Sphere and Beetle Box sculptures. Noor’s body of work is comprised of a good deal of pieces that focus on man-made transportation, so it’s really no surprise that he chose to morph the unmistakable VW for these particular works. Though these sculptures are not simply warped car bodies, Noor certainly creates that illusion. Instead, he relies on authentic and fabricated parts… crafting cast metal components, and thoughtfully displaying some of the car’s most recognizable features. Quite a feat, considering these are not computer generated (like these), but physical objects. Wow. The result is really something to behold.

Via ichwannoor.com and Wikipedia

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We’re not exactly sure of its origins, but perhaps you’ve heard of the folklore that claims dog owners begin to resemble their precious pooches over time. Hamburg, Germany-based freelance portrait, editorial and commercial photographer Ines Opifanti explores this notion in her ongoing series entitled The Dog People. While she’s not exactly sold on that claim, Opifanti does subscribe to the belief that owners become really good at interpreting their pets’ subtle mannerisms. We think Opifanti is really on to something with this… great series that could truly go on and on. It should be noted that these are authentic pairings of pet and owner, not models. Strong concept aside, Opifanti is clearly a very skilled photographer. Really nice shots. We love this all around.

More pet portraiture posts here and here.

Via ines-opifanti.com

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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Super-realistic art has a way of making the impossible seem possible. It can be mind-bending and beautiful all at the same time. The work of French artist Daniel Firman embodies those very qualities. His series featuring balancing elephants is particularly intriguing. Firman consulted an actual taxidermist to achieve impactful authenticity. We imagine seeing one of these pieces in person would give one pause… just incredible.

More realistic artwork here and here and here.

Via danielfirman.com

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It’s not often that we, the general public, are exposed to the ancestry of superheroes and other fictional characters. Stories of family roots have sometimes been depicted on the pages of comic books and graphic novels, and briefly on film. But Italian photography duo Carlo Marvellini and Andrea Marvellini, otherwise known as Foto Marvellini, have documented their heritage through some very impressive “historical” portraits. We are really taken with the authenticity of their work… well done. In their own words: “The historical company “Foto Marvellini – Milano” was founded when photography was born. As their old motto used to say, the Marvellini brothers performed “Portraits for everyone. Even for those who don’t want to be portrayed”. Through the generations Marvellini’s historical grew higher, becoming a great gallery of phantomatic characters. Hidden until today, this precious collection is now spread all over the world, as Andrea and Carlo Marvellini, the last heirs, desired.”

Another “historical” post here.

Via fotomarvellini.com and Facebook

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Part photojournalism, part fine art photography, Munich-based photographer Bernhard Lang’s “Aerial Views Adria” project plays to a variety of senses. These extraordinary photographs not only satisfy our own desire for visual symmetry and orderliness, they also feature a pleasing spectrum of colors. Perhaps the most amazing thing about this series is that it’s not Photoshopped. Lang captured authentic aerial views of seaside resorts at the Adriatic coastline in Italy, between Ravenna and Rimini. Be sure to check out his body of work, it’s really quite something.

Via bernhardlang.de and Behance

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Developed by Munich ad agency Serviceplan Group, this series of ads for Faber-Castell, known for its pencils, pens and other art supplies, is simple and effective. The concept is to show how true-to-life and authentic their colored pencils are. And we must say, they are executed beautifully. When an ad/campaign can stand on its own like these, we’d give it a thumbs up. We’d hang them on our walls. Love them

Via serviceplan.com

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We’ve always loved a good matchbook design. It’s sort of a lost art, really. When recent grad and Philadelphia-based designer Woody Harrington was asked to design a publishing piece for a series of flash fiction stories (basically a style of fiction literature of extreme brevity), he decided to turn them into vintage matchbooks. Harrington selected nine stories from Lou Beach’s “420 Characters” series, and turned each into a matchbook, deriving all design details from their respective story. The vintage feel seems authentic, and the way he transformed such a brief bit of writing into a tangible object is what design is all about. Big fans of this!

Via woddyharrington.com

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