Archives for posts with tag: basketball

Having a close relationship with marketing at ESPN, we see (and create ourselves) lots of sports-related designs. We recently came across the work of a young Texas-based designer by the name of Nick Bascus. His growing portfolio as a whole has a very nice aesthetic, and he has a clear grasp of graphic design fundamentals like color and typography. But the work that really shines is Bascus’s series of low-polygon illustrations and posters featuring some current NBA stars. These killer designs hit all the right notes, from composition to color choices. Bascus could easily expand on this series with great success, and we honestly hope to see his work on the pages of ESPN The Magazine (nudge, nudge… @espnmag) someday soon.

Via nickbascus.com

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What do you get when you unite a talented, young, rebellious artist with discarded artwork? Renaissance paintings that demand a double-take, for one. French artist Blase, aka Blasepheme, has artistic skills rooted in time-honored techniques. But his subversive sense of humor will not allow him to simply restore flea market finds. Blase does much more than that… he scours sales and brings old paintings back to life with fresh concepts and often satirical touches. Some may question a lack of respect for artists who came before him, but Blase can rest easy knowing that he is in the business of resurrecting these otherwise unwanted works, and giving them relevance. Proved by this very post… we’re talking about said paintings from some 3,600 miles away over the internet in 2017! Blase’s work is nothing short of badass, and we applaud not only his artistic prowess but also his defiant spirit.

More artistic renegades here and here and here.

Via blasepheme.com

Australian photographer James Popsys has some serious skills behind both the lens and his MacBook Pro, but his work is anything but serious. Popsys is not one to indulge in self-importance or highbrow projects but rather focuses on manipulating scenes from everyday life into playful, sometimes ironic works. That’s not to say his approach is not conceptual or smart… Popsys just can’t help but inject his subversive sense of humor into his surreal photographs. In these globally solemn and often humorless times, Popsys’s work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

Via jamespopsys.com

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Though recent weather patterns may suggest otherwise, summer is merely a fleeting memory, with that autumn feeling fast approaching. We recently stumbled upon the phenomenal work of Madrid-based studio Serial Cut, and more particularly a video they created for fashion/style giant DIESEL (who we are also especially fond of), that harkens back to those sultry summer days in the not so distant past. Showcasing their Spring/Summer collection, DIESEL commissioned Serial Cut to create this glossy, gravity defying promo loop, Melting Props, to display in store windows. We often find ourselves in awe of really well executed 3D/CGI work (here and here and here)… and Serial Cut’s work is among the best we’ve seen. In their own words: “A digital celebration of summer featuring pieces from this collection, including footwear, sunglasses, and bags, all inhabiting a glossy landscape. An ice cream cone, surfboard, and basketball all melt and dripping in the heat, encapsulated in a candy coating that shimmers through a rainbow of blues, greens, and pinks, with movements emphasizing the suspension of natural law as texture. Get into a surreal summer immersion, where gravity is merely a suggestion!”

Via serialcut.com

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Some of the best, most thought-provoking art and design is best viewed from a variety of angles. In fact, the work of Brooklyn-based artist Michael Murphy relies on varying vantage points. Murphy’s large-scale, complex structures are profoundly awe-inspiring (these photos surely don’t do them justice, they are best viewed in person). His multi-layered, multi-dimensional sculptures consist of suspended objects that, when viewed from different perspectives, reveal something more. Murphy explains, “[my] large-scale works seek to dominate the viewer’s physical and mental space, captivating the critical thought process as one circles around the various entities that form a cohesive whole. Pieces initially experienced on a visually flat plane resonate with meaning upon closer inspection, opening up cerebral capacities to perpetual reconsideration. The mesmerizing effect of the varied angles and ingredients of [my] sculptures provoke thought, using aesthetic titillation as their gateway.” Murphy’s conceptual approach, paired with his calculated orchestration of these phenomenal installations, is a true marvel on a many levels. Wow.

Via mmike.com

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We are no strangers to merging the world of sports with art and design (as ESPN is our biggest client). So we were really taken with this piece, commissioned by Esquire Magazine several years ago, by Parisian artist Xavier Veilhan when we came across it. At twelve feet by eight feet, it’s an imposing portrait of LeBron James made of plywood. Veilhan digitally manipulated and enlarged an image of the basketball icon, then cut pieces of plywood with a jigsaw, and layered and painted them. The result is quite something, and we’re sure even more impressive in person. More basketball art here and here and here.

Via veilhan.net

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You may have caught the college hoops doubleheader in Chicago last night. Barbour was proudly a part of the action with this event poster design.

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As designers, we have to retouch photos at least occasionally. But this retouching, by Portland, OR-based designer/photographer/Photoshop expert Daniel Kopton (AKA DanKlife), is truly awe-inspiring. Like a masterclass in photo retouching, this before-and-after look at Kopton’s work for Nike USA Basketball campaign is really enlightening… not only for the robust capabilities of modern computer software, but also the sheer talent of Kopton. Will definitely be looking at these every so often for a dose of inspiration.

Via Behance

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International visual firm Shotopop teamed with JWT Shanghai to take cardboard cut-outs to the next level. And boy, did they succeed. They were commissioned to develop and build three pieces, made up from the cardboard of shoeboxes, to represent three prominent Chinese basketball players, sponsored by popular Chinese sporting goods brand ANTA. Deservedly so, the project won an Outdoor, as well as a Design Lion at the International Cannes Lions Awards.

Via shotopop.com

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Good logo design is a tall order. Though the average person takes them for granted, well designed logos require lots of research, thought and planning (and time). Blogger Seth Rosenthal recently sat down with the man behind the Knicks logo, New York-raised, Los Angeles-based designer Michael Doret. It’s a great look at the process, and how some great designs often go unused (a phenomenon that we at Barbour are all too familiar with).

Via postingandtoasting.com (Part 1) (Part 2)

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