Archives for posts with tag: Biggie

Musical mashups often produce unexpectedly interesting results. The fusion of contrasting artists and genres can make for some pretty special compositions. Los Angeles-based artist (and United States Air Force Staff Sergeant) Corban Lundborg, also known as COLD, recently explored this concept visually after being commissioned to create artwork inspired by vinyl (hence the 12″ square design). Lundborg draws inspiration from both arresting and iconic vinyl logos, and his love of hip-hop. His series VINYL features hip-hop legends adorned with classic rock logos, and the result is terrific. But Lundborg doesn’t just haphazardly create these combos… his process seems much more thoughtful than that. Take “West Side of the Moon” for instance. Perhaps the strongest of the bunch, Lundborg places Pink Floyd’s famous Dark Side of the Moon logo over Tupac’s third eye, “inspired by his revolutionary message and social maturity. The refracting of light occurs when a wave enters a medium where its speed is different, and Tupac approached the music industry at an unmatched momentum.” Lundborg’s work, too, embodies a rebellious spirit that we really admire. His clear creative talent paired with his contemplative approach is a recipe for success. And we wish nothing but the best for this brilliant young artist’s future.

Via cold-studio.com

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We’ve seen a lot of intricate artwork fabricated from paper in new and interesting ways, but nothing quite like this. It’s the work of Cuban-born, North Carolina-based artist Felix Semper. While his sculptures resemble traditional stone busts, Semper injects a bit of a twist, literally, into these awesome creations. Rather than a hefty, solid material, Semper’s sculptures are crafted from hundreds of layers of glued paper to allow for surprising and awe-inspiring movement. With these stunning works, Sember flips the art of sculpture on its head… allowing a seemingly solid mass to twist and stretch. While we love all of his work, his most notable piece “Big Poppa” modeled after the late rap icon Notorious B.I.G. really strikes a chord. The juxtaposition of a contemporary figure in such a traditional art form is intriguing in and of itself, but the kinetic nature of Sember’s work makes it truly groundbreaking.

More paper artwork here and here and here.

Via felixsemper.com

What do you get when you unite a talented, young, rebellious artist with discarded artwork? Renaissance paintings that demand a double-take, for one. French artist Blase, aka Blasepheme, has artistic skills rooted in time-honored techniques. But his subversive sense of humor will not allow him to simply restore flea market finds. Blase does much more than that… he scours sales and brings old paintings back to life with fresh concepts and often satirical touches. Some may question a lack of respect for artists who came before him, but Blase can rest easy knowing that he is in the business of resurrecting these otherwise unwanted works, and giving them relevance. Proved by this very post… we’re talking about said paintings from some 3,600 miles away over the internet in 2017! Blase’s work is nothing short of badass, and we applaud not only his artistic prowess but also his defiant spirit.

More artistic renegades here and here and here.

Via blasepheme.com

Nostalgia is a prominent theme in art and design… simply a reflection of the human experience and human nature in general. We’ve seen it take many forms time and time again. Our latest find is a “bit” unexpected (no pun intended). Taking larger-than-life personas of rap and hip-hop artists, and minimizing them into pixelated 8-bit graphics may seem counterintuitive in this age of lifelike 3D avatars and such. But curiously enough, it works. This ever-growing collection of 8-bit characters is the brainchild of young UK artist A.Mulli (aka Adam Mulligan). A.Mulli’s low-res portraits pay homage to vintage arcade games like Street Fighter and Donkey Kong, imagining current hip-hop artists and rappers and other famous figures through the lens of a 1980s arcade character. Below are a few of our favorites. Keep ‘em coming, A.Mulli!

Via Instagram

AMulli-01 AMulli-02 AMulli-03 AMulli-04 AMulli-05 AMulli-06 AMulli-07 AMulli-08 AMulli-09 AMulli-10 AMulli-11 AMulli-12 AMulli-13 AMulli-14 AMulli-15 AMulli-16 AMulli-17 AMulli-18 AMulli-19 AMulli-20 AMulli-21 AMulli-22

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