Archives for posts with tag: Bob Marley

We particularly love when artists give everyday objects new context. Not only does this type of work capitalize on the element of surprise, but it also gives the viewer a glimpse into a creative mind. Artists who create these works (some past features here and here and here) see the world from a unique perspective. As is the case with self-proclaimed “Fantasy Researcher” Diego Cusano. Cusano, who has a background in visual arts and graphic design, explores the use of simple everyday objects in unexpected and creative ways. And so much so, in fact, that some high profile clients have taken notice and hired him for various campaigns, including Warner Bros., Adidas, Diesel, Dior, Cartier, Haribo, among others. In his own words, Cusano explains his work: “I started watching things from a different point of view, and from this new approach, I started creating the illustrations that, since then, I’m publishing each day on the social networks. Objects change their native function through the graphic to a new, different, unpredictable function. I always try to “re-invent” myself. I would like to give smiles when people look at my works.” It’s safe to say Cusano’s objective is on-point and wildly successful. His work definitely brings smiles to our faces.

Via diegocusano.com and Instagram

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Nostalgia is a prominent theme in art and design… simply a reflection of the human experience and human nature in general. We’ve seen it take many forms time and time again. Our latest find is a “bit” unexpected (no pun intended). Taking larger-than-life personas of rap and hip-hop artists, and minimizing them into pixelated 8-bit graphics may seem counterintuitive in this age of lifelike 3D avatars and such. But curiously enough, it works. This ever-growing collection of 8-bit characters is the brainchild of young UK artist A.Mulli (aka Adam Mulligan). A.Mulli’s low-res portraits pay homage to vintage arcade games like Street Fighter and Donkey Kong, imagining current hip-hop artists and rappers and other famous figures through the lens of a 1980s arcade character. Below are a few of our favorites. Keep ‘em coming, A.Mulli!

Via Instagram

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California-based artist and teacher Russell Powell gives new meaning to the term “hand painted.” Inspiring his young students and tens of thousands of Instagram followers, Powell has mastered the art of hand stamping, which is way more difficult than it sounds. We’re not talking elementary finger painting… Powell operates on a much higher artistic level. In short, he expertly paints (usually a portrait) on the palm of his hand, but does so rather quickly so it doesn’t dry. Then transfers it to paper or some other surface for preservation. It really is brilliant, and executed masterfully by Powell. Saying nothing of his stellar painting skills, conceptually it just works so well. The inevitable prints of his fingers and palm become an integral part of his work, making every single piece truly unique. One word: badass.

Via Instagram

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The landing page of Baltimore-based artist Joshua Budich’s website simply states “born to illustrate.” That’s a loaded declaration, but Budich certainly has the goods to back it up. His eclectic body of work is quite impressive, with an obvious love for pop culture. His style is reminiscent of comic book art, which lends itself to his familiar subjects from television, movies and music. Budich relies heavily on line work, and achieves some great, expressive details without overdoing it, or looking like he simply traced celebrities. He also has a great eye for composition and color, making his work recognizable now that we’re familiar with it (prints for sale here).

Via joshuabudich.com

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Typography geeks everywhere (including ourselves) are applauding (or should be applauding) Canadian designer/art director Sean Williams for a job well done on his growing series of musical artist portraits made entirely of lyrics and song titles. Many have tried, but we’re not sure any attempts are nearly as successful as these conceptually strong, brilliantly executed pieces. Williams masterfully warps typographic forms to create instantly recognizable faces of some of the biggest players in music today. What an amazing tribute by a super talented designer… hats off to him. Williams has even begun branching out beyond music; the possibilities are endless. Merchandise available here.

Via seaningsdesign.com

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Designer/art director Mark Brooks, who splits his time between his native Barcelona and New York City, designed this terrific series of limited edition prints and t-shirts for Barcelona retailer SantaMonica. The bold, sophisticated designs are really something. We especially like the star grid pieces, which are best viewed from a distance.

Via Behance and markbrooksgraphikdesign.com

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French illustrator best known as Yo Az has some excellent illustration skills, with an eye for details and texture. We really love his unique style… particularly fond of Kanye West and Paul McCartney pieces. Some prints available here.

Via Behance

British artist Steve Payne marries 17th-century Russian general portraiture with our current celebrity-obsessed culture… with remarkable results. He uses digital copies of Napoleon-era portraits by English portraitist George Dawe, then quite seamlessly photoshops celebrity heads on top. “One thing I’ve always wanted to try is to incorporate someone into a painting, mimicking the painterly brush strokes and making everything fit and work nicely and look natural and stuff,” Payne says. “There’s an art to head swapping, I’ve seen so many awful attempts. The most important things to consider are anatomy, perspective and lighting. If you can get those things right, you’re more than halfway there. My artistic ability serves me well with this stuff, I can just tell if something looks wrong.” Just a small sample below, be sure to check them all out.

Via replaceface.tumblr.com

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