Archives for posts with tag: body

For most artists, the palette knife is used for mixing paint, and in conjunction with brushes for applying paint. Tehran-based artist Salman Khoshroo eliminates brushes altogether. He applies thick layers of oil paint to his (massive) canvases with an arsenal of palette knives with such deliberate precision. Not only does Khoshroo have a deep visual understanding of the human form, but his sense of color is truly astounding. For an application process that seems so heavy-handed, Khoshroo remarkably uses color in clever and sometimes subtle ways as to establish cohesion in these borderline abstract works. We’d love to see a Bob Ross-style process video by Khoshroo… We find his method and resulting work equally intriguing.

Via salmankhoshroo.com

On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Creativity pulses through New Orleans artist Heather Hansen. And she, quite literally, puts her whole self into her work. A trained dancer with a love of fine arts, Hansen marries the two in beautiful and unexpected ways. With little more than charcoal in hand and fluid movements of her body on a giant canvas, Hansen produces stunning symmetrical kinetic works of art. Her thoughtfully choreographed movements are a sight to behold in and of themselves, but the patterns and lines that emerge in the process are the stars. This culmination of creativity is like nothing we’ve ever seen before. Absolutely beautiful.

Via heatherhansen.net

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Tattoos are often very telling. Each and every one seems to have a story behind it, and for those who are covered, it’s like a novel. British photographer Alan Powdrill brings some of these stories to light, with his latest project and exhibition, aptly titled Covered. Looking at Powdrill’s portfolio as a whole, we love his edginess, which seems to be a common thread. Here, Powdrill features subjects who are literally walking canvases, their bodies covered in ink, underneath their everyday garb. This series presents a nice juxtaposition, and gets our minds racing about the evolution of the indelible artwork for each subject, and which unassuming individuals in our own community might be adorned in tattoos in a similar fashion. Powdrill really gets to the heart of photography here… storytelling is fundamental, and his work is quite poetic. Fascinating project, and very well executed.

Via alanpowdrill.com

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Wood probably would not be a sculptor’s first choice to replicate ripples in clothing, flowing strands of hair, or someone emerging from water in a bikini after a swim. But Italian artist Peter Demetz sees no limits in his material of choice, which is what makes his work so remarkable. The incredibly lifelike details are truly awe-inspiring. Demetz’s familiarity with human anatomy, and his ability to transform a material that seems so rigid and inanimate is like nothing we’re ever seen. Also notable is Demetz’s sense of composition. Most of the figures’ backs are facing the viewer, often in some pensive moment that feels a bit sad and poignant through the authentic body language Demetz achieves with an almost photographic quality. Needless to say, Demetz is an immensely talented sculptor.

Be sure to check out the video below too… though it’s not in English, it gives a good sense of scale and process. Truly stunning.

Via peterdemetz.it

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Relying on forms of matter (say liquids and fine solids like powder) in photography can be a very tricky proposition. So much could go wrong. But for London-based photographer Iain Crawford such carefully planned orchestrations result in some incredible photography. Crawford has a very adventurous spirit when it comes to his photography work. He is always looking to push boundaries by finding new ways of doing things. His images embody a beautiful (and unpredictable) kinetic energy that seems almost impossible to capture without digital facilitation of Photoshop. Crawford on his work with paint, in his own words: “I love the fusion between paint and model. The resulting shapes are as opulent as any piece of bespoke couture. The excitement and anticipation as we waited to see the next piece of unpredictable chaos was electric. There was something magical about how random chance materialized into beautiful images in front of our eyes.”

Via iaincrawford.com

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Superheroes are often revered not only for their remarkable abilities, but also their superior body types and physiques. Chicago-based artist/illustrator Alex Solis turns that perception on its head in this fantastically funny series (which has actually expanded beyond superheroes to feature #famouschunkies). We love how Solis captures the essence of each character, so they are instantly recognizable, but super-sizes their bodies in a strangely endearing way. Some might say that this vision is a more cerebral endeavor… social commentary on American culture and our obesity epidemic. But somehow, we think Solis is using his own super talents to invoke a little laughter into our day. Mission accomplished! We can’t wait to see more.

Via Instagram

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