Archives for posts with tag: books

Some “tree huggers” may view paper art (here and here and here) as a gratuitous use of precious paper. But Spanish paper artist Malena Valcárcel may just have found a way to please art lovers and environmentalists alike. Valcárcel “upcycles” discarded or recycled books into quite beautiful sculptures. She is astoundingly self-taught, and her work is intricate and delicate in a way that serves the fine print of her chosen medium (printed matter) really well. She even utilizes lighting in some of her pieces, which adds an entirely new magical dimension. In her own words, “My main inspirations come from nature and everyday life, and I often return to certain ideas again and again. Flowers, trees, butterflies, houses, clouds … without forgetting the sea, really fascinate me. Turning books into sculptures, cutting and shaping paper into different shapes or abstract forms never ceases to amaze me, and when the work is finished, just contemplating it brings a smile to my face. Making things has always been incredibly important to me and it is often an amazing release to get it out of my system. It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work…the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm.” Charming, indeed.

Via Behance and Etsy

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Japanese artist and student Hikaru Cho seems to employ her stellar artistic skills with a single purpose: illusion. Whether it be illustration, body painting, or sculpture, Cho aims to woo viewers with deception… in a (usually) playful, lighthearted manner, of course. Her work can be a bit unnerving at times… adding extra eyes, misplacing ears, etc. On the other hand, she also likes to play with food, disguising one food as another, for example. No matter that subject matter, Cho’s work certainly intrigues. Her personality shines through, which is impressive considering her tremendous skill set. It’s hard to believe she’s still a student! Cho certainly has a bright future ahead… we’re going to keep an eye on her.

Via hikarucho.com

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Rome-based artist Ekaterina Panikanova is an excellent illustrator and painter. But what makes his work really special is his use of books as canvas. Panikanova achieves a collage-like effect by lying these books open and flat while drawing on them. And the results are quite remarkable. We love the composition and overlapping textures.

Via ekaterinapanikanova.com

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New York-based designer Evan Robertson may be something of a bookworm, but just about anyone can appreciate his literature-inspired series of prints, The Illustrated Quotation Project. Robertson takes lines from some of his favorite authors and turns them into these superb, clever posters (for sale here). We like the variety of Robertson’s high-contrast style, but also the uniformity of the series. Well done, looking forward to seeing more.

Via obviousstate.com

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We’ve always loved a good matchbook design. It’s sort of a lost art, really. When recent grad and Philadelphia-based designer Woody Harrington was asked to design a publishing piece for a series of flash fiction stories (basically a style of fiction literature of extreme brevity), he decided to turn them into vintage matchbooks. Harrington selected nine stories from Lou Beach’s “420 Characters” series, and turned each into a matchbook, deriving all design details from their respective story. The vintage feel seems authentic, and the way he transformed such a brief bit of writing into a tangible object is what design is all about. Big fans of this!

Via woddyharrington.com

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