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Pop art is alive and well. Having materialized in the 1950s as an alternative to the traditions of fine art, the movement draws from popular culture and often relies on irony. As we’ve noted before, our highly connected, celebrity-obsessed culture is a breeding ground for such art, so it’s no surprise that it seems to be a particularly thriving art scene these days. And many artist have emerged as household names through the years, such as Andy Warhol, Keith Haring and Roy Lichtenstein. Though not quite that prominent (yet), Brazilian artist and designer known as Butcher Billy has a tremendous body of work that pushes pop art forward, while also paying tribute to the past. Butcher Billy is “known for his illustrations based on the contemporary pop art movement. His work has a strong vintage comic book and street art influence while also making use of pop cultural references in music, cinema, art, literature, games, history and politics.” This is just a small sample of his extensive, diverse portfolio. If you didn’t know Butcher Billy’s work, now you do. Killin’ it, indeed.

Via Behance and curioos.com

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When London-based designer Alexander Klement sets a personal design goal, he follows through in a big way. And his Lathe typeface is a shining example. As fellow designers, we understand that typeface design is no easy task. How do you create something fresh and new, when it has been done over and over in so many ways? Klement certainly created something we’ve never seen before. There’s great dimension to his figures, and we love how he explored various textures. Each character also stands quite nicely on its own. In his own words: “I decided not to design a typeface from scratch as there are so many great ones out there I could just add a personal touch to an existing one. I chose Futura as a base typeface for its simple, clean and modern characteristics. I started by creating a base generative extrusion which was applied to each character. Materials were then explored and applied to the characters to give a sense of a real life object.” Well done.

Via alexanderklement.co.uk

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