Archives for posts with tag: cerebral

Israeli photographer Rubi Lebovitch has a sort of subversive sense of humor, and for the record, we love it. Though his photographs themselves are pretty straightforward, Lebovitch has the uncanny ability to find the absurd in the ordinary. There’s a great cerebral quality to his work, in which the viewer is not guided by a predetermined story arc, but instead can deduce any number of things from his unexpected and beautifully absurd work. For his series Home Sweet Home, Lebovitch utilizes an intimate domestic setting for a veritable fun house. There is a certain charm in Lebovitch’s hyperbole, and ironically enough, you too can display it in your own home in a tidy coffee table book (available here). In his own words, Lebovitch discusses his book: “My photographs deal with domestic scenes captured in straightforward images…characterized by mystery, vagueness and absurdity. I create a twist in familiar sights and build new contexts, thus endowing the scene with new meanings. Mundane objects and domestic spaces are transformed into something strange and surprising. My images do not contain a clear-cut story or plot. The characters are inscrutable to the viewers and difficult to identify; their relationship with the world around them is senseless and they fail to communicate. Rationality is substituted by a twisted and exaggerated worldview. I employ a multiplicity of objects, allowing the objects to grow stronger and take over reality; they occupy and control the space. The scenes depicted in the photographs emphasize what usually remains hidden: the repressed, which cannot be described. The anxiety these scenes arouse undermines the peacefulness and security usually associated with home.”

Via rubilebovitch.com and loeildelaphotographie.com

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With the latest Apple releases, so too will come the flood of YouTube videos of folks “testing” the new devices in all sorts of precarious scenarios (submerging your new iPhone in a vat of soda, then freezing it for 12 hours, anyone?). New Zealand-born, Brooklyn-based photographer/artist Henry Hargreaves (whose stellar work we’ve discussed here and here) takes a more cerebral approach to a practice that is no less cringe-inducing to us gadget geeks. Hargreaves, along with his stylist partner Caitlin Levin, whose incredible collaborations almost always employ food as the medium, juxtaposes said electronic devices with fast food in their series Deep Fried Gadgets. While we do shudder slightly at the sight of intentionally defacing these gizmos that we hold in such high regard, we certainly appreciate the concept and commentary, not to mention the fascinatingly engaging visuals. In Hargreaves’s own words, “I like to play with food and the juxtaposition of different worlds. I found a video of some Japanese kids trying to deep fry a PSP and eat it, it didn’t work and they made a mess of it, but I loved the idea and thought it could be expanded and photographed in a beautiful way. Electronics have become almost a holy device, the way a new apple device sends people out of their minds. But as soon as the next model comes out the last is immediately forgotten. This is a commentary about the similarities between tech culture and fast food. Quickly devoured and then discarded because of our appetite for the newest product.”

Via hargreavesandlevin.com

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Some of the best, most thought-provoking art and design is best viewed from a variety of angles. In fact, the work of Brooklyn-based artist Michael Murphy relies on varying vantage points. Murphy’s large-scale, complex structures are profoundly awe-inspiring (these photos surely don’t do them justice, they are best viewed in person). His multi-layered, multi-dimensional sculptures consist of suspended objects that, when viewed from different perspectives, reveal something more. Murphy explains, “[my] large-scale works seek to dominate the viewer’s physical and mental space, captivating the critical thought process as one circles around the various entities that form a cohesive whole. Pieces initially experienced on a visually flat plane resonate with meaning upon closer inspection, opening up cerebral capacities to perpetual reconsideration. The mesmerizing effect of the varied angles and ingredients of [my] sculptures provoke thought, using aesthetic titillation as their gateway.” Murphy’s conceptual approach, paired with his calculated orchestration of these phenomenal installations, is a true marvel on a many levels. Wow.

Via mmike.com

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Light and shadow are among the fundamentals of photography. Barcelona-based photographer/art director Pol Úbeda Hervàs created this series of photos that puts his own shadow front and center, as the subject of this intriguing work. Hervàs explains that these pieces are about identity: “How can we accept that we are changing? How can we accept we hardly recognize ourselves in certain situations? I am changing at this very moment of my life. I do not react in the same ways I used to. I am surprised. Is that me? These pictures are the way I see myself now. My shadow is there but I erase myself because I don´t know who I am any longer. The shoes remain only to make sure there is something more than… a shadow.” This may seem like a rather cerebral concept to some, but it really is quite straightforward. And executed perfectly by Hervàs. Well done!

Via Flickr

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This is already the second time in a few months that we’ve posted about the work of Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac (previous post here). We are so taken with his work, which firmly addresses the notion that creativity and technology and science are not mutually exclusive, that we just had to share. In this series, Stardust, Albiac again explores technological processes to create generative works of art. The methodology behind this is admittedly over our heads, but the results are certainly impressive. Albiac basically uses images from the Hubble Space Telescope to compose portraits based on the concept of nucleosynthesis. He even solicited internet participation, which resulted in more than 15,000 works. In his own words, Albiac explains: “As a theme for this series of portraits, I’ve choosen the concept of nucleosynthesis or the process of creation of new atomic nuclei from pre-existing matter that takes place at cosmic scale. We humans, are believed to be novel combinations of cosmic stardust. It could be argued that the whole universe is the biggest running generative art installation today.”

Via sergioalbiac.com

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Animal photography is often seen as cute and sometimes kitschy (and we have featured such works, which we feel do have a place). But London-based photographer Tim Flach takes an entirely different approach. Using principles of human portraiture, Flach’s highly conceptual work is informed by his concerns with anthropomorphism and anthropocentrism. Directly from his artist’s statement, Flach says his “interests lie in the way humans shape animals, and shape their meaning. Whether genetically, as with the featherless chicken, or with the symbolism that gives a special significance to a dove but dismisses a London pigeon as a flying rat. His images aim to promote discussion and encourage debate.” While there is clearly a cerebral mission at work here, we cannot dismiss the artistic value. Flach presents his animal subjects in unusual ways that genuinely engage the viewer. We love the intimacy he achieves, and the studio setting really brings the subjects forth. There should be no debate about how incredible Flach’s work is.

Via timflach.com

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Collage work, though we’ve all created some form of it from an early age, is way more difficult than it looks… especially at a masterful level of fine art. Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is one such master, who marries traditional media and generative computer code in unexpected ways. Albiac’s series “You are not in the news” explores the relationship between self-worth and media exposure. These compositions are striking, to say the least. And a glimpse into Albiac’s process makes them that much more special. In his own words: “When I code a generative sketch, I introduce control (the sentences that govern the sketching action) and also a degree of randomness in the code. This is a machine control/randomness balance. Then, I select certain outputs (again, human control) and I paint a canvas using the selected generative images as an starting point, without the aim of exact reproduction. The act of painting is a struggle between control and randomness because, depending of the painting technique, paint behavior cannot be totally controlled by the painter. In this way, I explore a fascinating “dialogue” between control/randomness and machine/human interaction. It makes sense to me. I feel connected to artistic tradition but using the generative sketchbook process, I can create in a very contemporary and innovative way that deeply reflects the ideas I need to express.” Just brilliant

Previous post about a very different approach to generative art here. And more collage work here.

Via sergioalbiac.com

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This rather cerebral study of typography by Austrian designer/sculptor/artist Andreas Scheiger is quite fitting for Halloween. Taking inspiration from noted type designer Frederic W. Goudy´s “The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering,” and treating letters like organisms and typefaces as species, Scheiger created this amazing series, Evolution of Type. We’re fascinated by Scheiger’s surgical dissection and the sheer level of detail he achieves. Great concept and even better execution.

Via Behance

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