Archives for posts with tag: chair

Transforming everyday objects into art holds a special place for us. It harkens back to childhood thoughts, when our minds wandered while staring out the car window at cloud formations that looked like other things. Or when we’d doodle with no purpose other than to document our own whimsical musings. These days, artists apply conceptual thinking to this cherished pastime, and the results are often special and surprising (here and here and here). Included among those artists is German-born, Australian-based Domenic Bahmann (aka Domfriday). What started as a personal exercise in creative thinking has since populated his Instagram page, which piques the interest of almost 60K followers. And, in turn, has even led to retail opportunities due to popular demand (here and here). In his own words, Bahmann explains: “In 2013 I started my own creative challenge called ‘Stop, Think, Make’. I had to come up with a new image or illustration at least once a week. Since then I try to see the world in the way I used to when I was a child. Staying playful and curious isn’t always easy in our busy modern world.”

Via Instagram

Bahmann-01 Bahmann-02 Bahmann-03 Bahmann-04 Bahmann-05 Bahmann-06 Bahmann-07 Bahmann-08 Bahmann-09 Bahmann-10 Bahmann-11 Bahmann-12 Bahmann-13 Bahmann-14 Bahmann-15 Bahmann-16 Bahmann-17 Bahmann-18 Bahmann-19 Bahmann-20 Bahmann-21 Bahmann-22 Bahmann-23 Bahmann-24 Bahmann-25

Advertisements

We find the manipulation of wood just fascinating. In the right hands, the possibilities are endless. In its natural state as trees, wood can obviously be quite beautiful. But the notion that an artist can create objects that harken back to their natural state, even after having served a function, is really quite something. The extraordinary work of Paris-based French-Argentinean artist and designer Pablo Reinoso speaks to this very idea: “For the series entitled Spaghetti Bench, Pablo Reinoso used public benches, which are anonymously designed and travel across cultures with an out-of-time, old-fashioned quality, as a starting point for his reflections. Started in 2006, these new creations have multiplied and found homes in very diverse places. In line with his work on Thonet’s chairs, the artist explores once again the seat as object. Yet this time it is no longer the object but matter that frees itself from its function and pursues its fate of wood, tree, plant. Reinoso stages benches that, after having accomplished their task as furniture, revert into growing, climbing branches. This freedom is expressed in a movement that embraces architecture, wandering through places, exploring their nooks and crannies, and giving free rein to its whims.” The fluidity of his work, juxtaposed with the perceived functionality of the traditional park bench, makes for some thought-provoking art. Each seems to tell a story. We are particularly taken with the Romeo and Juliette bench that climbs a balcony overhead. Incredible.

Via pabloreinoso.com

Reinoso-01 Reinoso-02 Reinoso-03 Reinoso-04 Reinoso-05 Reinoso-06 Reinoso-07 Reinoso-08 Reinoso-09 Reinoso-10 Reinoso-11 Reinoso-12 Reinoso-13 Reinoso-14 Reinoso-15 Reinoso-16 Reinoso-17 Reinoso-18 Reinoso-19 Reinoso-20 Reinoso-21

We often focus on a single project or series, but the growing body of work by Kyle Wilkeson is just too good not to share. Wilkeson, Yorkshire, England-based letterer/designer/creative director, is innately talented. Quite simply, his work is special. From experimental lettering of Pecha Kucha promotional materials, to the thoughtful typography of his ADC invitation, to his surprisingly elegant and graphic Phaeton Chair, Wilkeson is a young designer to watch.

Via kylewilkinson.co.uk

Wilkeson-01 Wilkeson-02 Wilkeson-03 Wilkeson-04 Wilkeson-05 Wilkeson-06 Wilkeson-07 Wilkeson-08 Wilkeson-09 Wilkeson-10 Wilkeson-11 Wilkeson-12 Wilkeson-13 Wilkeson-14 Wilkeson-15 Wilkeson-16 Wilkeson-17 Wilkeson-18 Wilkeson-19 Wilkeson-20 Wilkeson-21 Wilkeson-22 Wilkeson-23 Wilkeson-24 Wilkeson-25 Wilkeson-26

%d bloggers like this: