Archives for posts with tag: chalk

Chalking has been growing in popularity for years, in part due to the increased visibility of incredible artists like Dana Tanamachi (here) and others (here and here). There seems to be a mini movement in Japan right now involving blackboards and chalk (more here). As the saying goes, “everything old is new again”, blackboards, which are now being replaced with whiteboards, possess a sort of novelty these days. Hirotaka Hamasaki, aka Hamacream, is a Japanese art teacher with incredible skills and thousands of Instagram followers. His ability to recreate intricate familiar works of art (on a chalkboard, no less) is just stunning. Though the impermanence of this medium is a bit unnerving to us (we’d want to preserve these works for a long time), they are no less brilliantly executed for having been created with chalk. Truly inspiring.

Via Instagram and Twitter

hamacream-01 hamacream-02 hamacream-03 hamacream-04 hamacream-05 hamacream-06 hamacream-07 hamacream-08 hamacream-09 hamacream-10 hamacream-11 hamacream-12 hamacream-13 hamacream-14

Advertisements

We’ve seem many artistic mediums, but never something quite like this. Some of the most recent works by artist Dino Tomic (aka AtomiccircuS) resemble chalk, but its actually… wait for it… ordinary table salt. Based in Norway, by way of Croatia, Tomic painstakingly arranges salt granules in such away that he achieves stunning variations of tone, giving these incredible Game of Thrones portraits an incredibly realistic feel. His beautifully intricate mandalas are also pretty remarkable. There’s simply no denying Tomic’s gift of visualizing his compositions, then slowly building them with his bare hands. And his 270,000+ Instagram followers would surely agree. Try to refrain from yelling at your screen when you reach the 1:07 mark in the video below. Now you can’t say you weren’t warned.

Via Facebook

Tomic-01 Tomic-02 Tomic-03 Tomic-04 Tomic-05

Indonesia-based artist/photographer/designer Romo Jack, otherwise known by the handle @ponypork, gives new meaning to working with one’s hands. Jack, a 20-something savvy social media maven, dreams up a variety of otherwise mundane activities, such as cooking, ironing, painting, drawing, playing music, playing sports, and even photographing, and captures them from an aerial point of view. Jack’s terrific compositions all have two things in common: his signature elaborately tattooed forearms as a subject, and a (very deliberately) Instagram-friendly square canvas. We appreciate Jack’s attention to detail and meticulous crafting of each image. We’re excited to see how this fantastic series, #whatmyhandsdoing, evolves in the future. And his ever-growing base of almost 33,000 Instagram followers undoubtedly feels the same.

Via Instagram

ponypork-01 ponypork-02 ponypork-03 ponypork-04 ponypork-05 ponypork-06 ponypork-07 ponypork-08 ponypork-09 ponypork-10 ponypork-11 ponypork-12 ponypork-13 ponypork-14 ponypork-15 ponypork-16

A couple members of the Barbour team had the honor of witnessing a speaking engagement by the incomparable Dana Tanamachi at Create Upstate in Syracuse last week. The event itself was terrific, from the impressive venue (great food, btw), awesome vendors, and stellar lineup of speakers. One highlight was undoubtedly the inspirational work and philosophy of Tanamachi. Honestly, we’re not saying anything new here, just bowing down, as most who are exposed to her transcendent work tend to do. Texas-bred, Brooklyn-based Tanamachi, whose lettering work is quite ubiquitous (you’ve probably seen it, or a rip-off of it, and may not have realized it was hers), seems quite gracious, humble, passionate and sincere when discussing her craft. She’s not some Brooklyn hipster who is too cool for school. Her tremendous talents seemed to have emerged over time, and her rise in the design world happened organically, which we truly admire. Tanamachi is a rock star among our peers, and we are just happy to have spent an engaging hour in her presence. Here’s a small sampling of her formidable body of work… prepare to drool.

Via tanamachistudio.com

Tanamachi-01 Tanamachi-02 Tanamachi-03 Tanamachi-04 Tanamachi-05 Tanamachi-06 Tanamachi-07 Tanamachi-08 Tanamachi-09 Tanamachi-10 Tanamachi-11 Tanamachi-12 Tanamachi-13 Tanamachi-14 Tanamachi-15 Tanamachi-16 Tanamachi-17 Tanamachi-18 Tanamachi-19 Tanamachi-20 Tanamachi-21 Tanamachi-22 Tanamachi-23 Tanamachi-24 Tanamachi-25 Tanamachi-26 Tanamachi-27 Tanamachi-28 Tanamachi-29 Tanamachi-30 Tanamachi-31 Tanamachi-32 Tanamachi-33

%d bloggers like this: