Archives for posts with tag: change

Graphic design is a key tool in activism, no matter the cause. Arresting (designed) visuals have historically been a cornerstone of social and political change. As time marches on, and we become more connected, original ideas seem harder to come by. Visuals become derivative over time, not necessarily intentionally but often subconsciously. So when we see something that stands out, we take notice. As is the case with this Greenpeace campaign by powerhouse ad agency Young & Rubicam. Not only are we taken with the straightforward and impactful concept, but also the execution. It appears to be a masterclass in 3D modeling in our estimation, with stunning details that truly blur the lines between CGI and reality. Simply put, it’s a terrific use of modern design technology that really communicates an important message effectively.

Via Behance

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Graffiti by its very nature changes the appearance of the surface on which it is displayed. But what happens when the “graffiti” itself continually changes as well? Delhi, India-based graffiti artist Daku (which literally means “bandit” or “dacoit” in Hindi… clearly a reference to the outlaw nature of graffiti art itself) explores this concept with his absolutely brilliant piece Time Changes Everything. Technically more public art than graffiti, Daku worked with St+art India Foundation, a non-profit organization that works on art projects in public spaces with accessibility of art as the main goal. Daku’s innovative work is basically a typographic sundial, where thoughtfully chosen words associated with change over the passage of time cast a shadow on a building’s facade by way of sunlight. From conception to execution, we are absolutely taken with this project. Mystery surrounding Daku’s actual identity may be part of his allure, but his overwhelming talent is crystal clear.

Via st-artindia.org and Instagram (daku156 and startindia)

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Light and shadow are among the fundamentals of photography. Barcelona-based photographer/art director Pol Úbeda Hervàs created this series of photos that puts his own shadow front and center, as the subject of this intriguing work. Hervàs explains that these pieces are about identity: “How can we accept that we are changing? How can we accept we hardly recognize ourselves in certain situations? I am changing at this very moment of my life. I do not react in the same ways I used to. I am surprised. Is that me? These pictures are the way I see myself now. My shadow is there but I erase myself because I don´t know who I am any longer. The shoes remain only to make sure there is something more than… a shadow.” This may seem like a rather cerebral concept to some, but it really is quite straightforward. And executed perfectly by Hervàs. Well done!

Via Flickr

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