Archives for posts with tag: child

In recent years, much has been made about America’s addiction to sugar (eye-opening 60 Minutes piece of journalism, here). It really is an epidemic whose impact has yet to be truly realized. But we are slowly waking up to the fact that our sugar-loaded diet is not only making us fat, but it’s also killing us with covert toxicity. New York-based production company Dress Code recently tackled the subject through a thoughtful animated short, aptly titled Coke Habit. Though Dress Code’s usual workload is of the commercial variety, original content plays an important role in any creative enterprise. This superbly crafted surrealist mini masterpiece, featuring arguably the most iconic brand on the planet, tells a true childhood story of staffer “Mike” and his Coke addiction… as in seemingly benign Coca-Cola. From their adept use of color to their masterful storytelling, Dress Code hits all the marks with this brilliant little film.

Via Vimeo and dresscodeny.com

Advertisements

It’s a wonder we’ve never come across another photographer doing this, or perhaps it’s just never been done so well. We’re all familiar with Australian photographer Anne Geddes’s ubiquitous photos of sleeping babies. But Southern California-based photographer Laura Izumikawa takes a slightly edgier approach. What we imagine started off as the new mother’s inability to rest while her newborn daughter, Joey Marie, sleeps, Izumikawa channeled her stellar photography skills into a growing series that we just can’t get enough of. From Beyoncé to Pikachu to Sia to Cinderella, Izumikawa photographs her adorable (and cooperative) daughter in various states of costumed slumber. Not sure how long these brilliant cosplay (yes, a contraction of the words costume and play) photos can/will continue, but we urge Izumikawa to keep snapping a dozing Joey as long as she can. Brings a huge smile to our faces!

If you love these photos, check out a previous playful post (here).

Via Instagram

izumikawa-01 izumikawa-02 izumikawa-03 izumikawa-04 izumikawa-05 izumikawa-06 izumikawa-07 izumikawa-08 izumikawa-09 izumikawa-10 izumikawa-11 izumikawa-12 izumikawa-13 izumikawa-14 izumikawa-15 izumikawa-16 izumikawa-17 izumikawa-18 izumikawa-19 izumikawa-20 izumikawa-21 izumikawa-22 izumikawa-23 izumikawa-24 izumikawa-25 izumikawa-26 izumikawa-27

Make no mistake, the captivating portfolio of Thailand-born, Sydney, Australia-based photographer/designer Peechaya Burroughs is no child’s play. Though her work is certainly whimsical and intrinsically approachable, it boasts no less artistic merit than fine art of a different nature. Burroughs’s minimalist approach to mostly hand-manipulated works is striking in a vast ocean of tricked out Photoshop work (which has merit in its own right, but the work of Burroughs is sort of refreshing in some ways). In her own words, Burroughs explains: “My photographs mainly consist of things that I create or manipulate by hand. Occasionally I use Photoshop when enhancing the idea and presentation of an image fits well. Driven by childhood memories and very much fascinated by children’s imagination and their quirkiness, the direction of my photography is light, easy to approach with a little touch of everyday optimism.”

Via peechayaburroughs.com and Instagram

Burroughs-01 Burroughs-02 Burroughs-03 Burroughs-04 Burroughs-05 Burroughs-06 Burroughs-07 Burroughs-08 Burroughs-09 Burroughs-10 Burroughs-11 Burroughs-12 Burroughs-13 Burroughs-14 Burroughs-15 Burroughs-16 Burroughs-17 Burroughs-18

There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

Dana-01 Dana-02 Dana-03 Dana-04 Dana-05 Dana-06 Dana-07 Dana-08 Dana-09 Dana-10 Dana-11 Dana-12

We may have a subconscious fixation with design in Italy… unintentionally our second such post in a row. This time, we look at some imaginative work of Italian art director Matteo Pozzi. Though these are advertisements for the baby product company Cam, they could easily stand on their own as examples of surrealist design. Cam’s mission is, in part, “To look at the world through children’s eyes to understand exactly what they need… only those who know how to look at the world from a child’s point of view can find the solutions to make this world more enjoyable and, above all, safer.” For this campaign, Pozzi and team answer fanciful questions that children ask, employing a surreal visual narrative that is completely engaging. Though these pieces certainly have the potential to be a hodgepodge of gratuitous Photoshop effects, the execution of these concepts in the hands of Pozzi and his team feels organic and looks flawless.

More surreal design here and here and here.

Via Behance

Pozzi-1 Pozzi-2 Pozzi-3 Pozzi-4 Pozzi-5 Pozzi-6 Pozzi-7 Pozzi-8

Paris-based high-end freelance photo retoucher Cristian Girotto is crazy talented. His L’ Enfant Extérieur (The Outer Child) series demonstrates what it would like if adults’ inner child were revealed. It’s a fascinating look at bodily proportions and features that make a child, well, look like a child. We would love to see before photos of his subjects, though. Quirky subject matter aside, it’s worth noting that these are beautiful photos. In his own words, Girotto says: “…somewhere inside each of us, there’s a young core, instinctive, creative but also innocent and naïve. What would happen if this intimate essence would be completely revealed?”

Via cristiangirotto.com

Girotto-1 Girotto-2 Girotto-3 Girotto-4 Girotto-5 Girotto-6

%d bloggers like this: