Archives for posts with tag: children

Melbourne, Australia-based contemporary artist Ben Frost has a pop art aesthetic with a subversive, confrontational spirit. In some of his most recent work, Frost essentially uses mainly (junk) food and pharmaceutical packaging as a canvas for his bold illustrations inspired by pop culture, Roy Lichtenstein, and manga. His mashups are not random, though… Frost exhibits his mastery of juxtaposition with these works in a way that can be truly provocative. Through his work, Frost continually pushes boundaries and challenges social norms while addressing our advertising-soaked, consumer-obsessed culture. In his own statement, Frost describes: “By subverting mainstream iconography from the worlds of advertising, entertainment, and politics, he creates a visual framework that is bold, confronting and often controversial.”

Via benfrostisdead.com

Advertisements

You may recognize Perler beads from your childhood. or perhaps your children (or you) enjoy these tactile “pixels” today, whose novelty bucks the digital trend. One thing is for sure, these tiny fusible plastic beads have an appeal that transcends age and skill level. Romanian artist Claudiu Alexandru takes beading to a whole new level, having spent some 85 hours and 45,000 beads with little more than a pair of tweezers (and lots of patience) on his latest masterpiece. The result is quite something.

Via Facebook

Legos and art have been crossing paths for years now (here and here and here). These colorful bricks that come in a vast spectrum of colors inspire not only young children, but also creative-thinking adults the world over. We are in awe of this brilliant ad campaign for Lego from a few years back, featuring highly minimalistic configurations of single-stud bricks depicting some of the most iconic paintings by masters from da Vinci to van Gogh. The human brain is truly intriguing. The fact that most people would recognize these works of art, with mere hints of details, really is amazing when we think about it. Kudos to Milan-based art director Marco Sodano for the clever concept and flawless execution.

Via Behance

sodano-01 sodano-02 sodano-03 sodano-04 sodano-05 sodano-06 sodano-07 sodano-08 sodano-09 sodano-10 sodano-11 sodano-12

Painting rocks is a favorite pastime of many, but Michigan artist/illustrator/designer/author/educator Aaron Zenz has taken it to a whole other level. In preparation for what is now known as the “most-attended public art event on the planet”, ArtPrize in Grand Rapids, Michigan (happening right now), Zenz and his six children collected and painted over 1,000 rocks over the course of a year. Zenz describes the project in his own words: “I painted them 7 solid base colors, representing myself and my six children. I invited these family members to fill the rocks with any kind of faces they wanted. All the rocks were painted in matching pairs. I took half of the rocks, 500, and arranged them outside the Children’s Museum in a sprawling display, creating a kaleidoscope of colors, shapes, and patterns. I took the other matching 500 rocks and hid them all over Grand Rapids in random locations. As your family enjoys the day at ArtPrize, keep your eyes open! You will notice details of GR streets like never before. How many of the 500 hidden rocks can you spot? Who in your party has the quickest eyes? When you spot one, leave it where it is and snap a photo. View and share photo discoveries on social media with the hashtag #RockAroundGR to get the complete community building experience.” What a fantastic undertaking on so many levels. With all the often somber headlines lately, this home-grown, positive interactive art experience is certainly a welcome highlight. We only wish it was closer! Think of it as a Stone Age Pokémon GO.

Via artprize.org

zenz-01 zenz-02 zenz-03 zenz-04 zenz-05 zenz-06 zenz-07 zenz-08 zenz-09 zenz-10 zenz-11 zenz-12 zenz-13 zenz-14 zenz-15 zenz-16

Make no mistake, the captivating portfolio of Thailand-born, Sydney, Australia-based photographer/designer Peechaya Burroughs is no child’s play. Though her work is certainly whimsical and intrinsically approachable, it boasts no less artistic merit than fine art of a different nature. Burroughs’s minimalist approach to mostly hand-manipulated works is striking in a vast ocean of tricked out Photoshop work (which has merit in its own right, but the work of Burroughs is sort of refreshing in some ways). In her own words, Burroughs explains: “My photographs mainly consist of things that I create or manipulate by hand. Occasionally I use Photoshop when enhancing the idea and presentation of an image fits well. Driven by childhood memories and very much fascinated by children’s imagination and their quirkiness, the direction of my photography is light, easy to approach with a little touch of everyday optimism.”

Via peechayaburroughs.com and Instagram

Burroughs-01 Burroughs-02 Burroughs-03 Burroughs-04 Burroughs-05 Burroughs-06 Burroughs-07 Burroughs-08 Burroughs-09 Burroughs-10 Burroughs-11 Burroughs-12 Burroughs-13 Burroughs-14 Burroughs-15 Burroughs-16 Burroughs-17 Burroughs-18

There are few joys in life greater than creating something for your child, especially when you’re in the business of creating. San Fransisco-based designer/illustrator Kyson Dana tapped into that very happiness when he and fellow illustrator Jeffery Smith challenged each other to a sketching duel (think Type Fight). After 26 days, Dana knew he would have a special alphabet of animals to share with his young son. The premise was simple, but the execution was quite challenging (and inspiring). In his own words, Dana describes the project: “The rules for the competition were that we had to draw one animal per day and post it to Instagram by midnight. The animal had to start with the letter of the day and the composition could be created using any medium. We made our way through the alphabet beginning with the letter ‘A’ for a full 26 days and never missed a sketch. The pressure of producing a solid sketch grew more and more with each day and we saw our standard for what we posted slowly rise with each new day as well. Finally after 26 days we ended the duel with a bunch of sketches and more than 1,500 new Instagram followers to show for it.” This is just a sampling of Dana’s sketches. Be sure to also check out his outstanding portfolio.

Via kysondana.com and Instagram

Dana-01 Dana-02 Dana-03 Dana-04 Dana-05 Dana-06 Dana-07 Dana-08 Dana-09 Dana-10 Dana-11 Dana-12

On the heels of the 87th Annual Academy Awards, we can’t help but feature this funny compilation of parodied clips featuring kids reenacting scenes from this year’s Best Picture nominees (American Sniper, The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Imitation Game, The Theory of Everything, Birdman, Selma, Boyhood and Whiplash). Directed by Los Angeles-based producer/director Ethan Cushing for CineFix, “Kid Oscars 2015” is comical and awkward all at the same time (just picture child actors impersonating Martin Luther King Jr. and Stephen Hawking). It’s all in good fun, and highly entertaining.

Via YouTube

KidOscars-2 KidOscars-3 KidOscars-4 KidOscars-5 KidOscars-6 KidOscars-7 KidOscars-8 KidOscars-9

We may have a subconscious fixation with design in Italy… unintentionally our second such post in a row. This time, we look at some imaginative work of Italian art director Matteo Pozzi. Though these are advertisements for the baby product company Cam, they could easily stand on their own as examples of surrealist design. Cam’s mission is, in part, “To look at the world through children’s eyes to understand exactly what they need… only those who know how to look at the world from a child’s point of view can find the solutions to make this world more enjoyable and, above all, safer.” For this campaign, Pozzi and team answer fanciful questions that children ask, employing a surreal visual narrative that is completely engaging. Though these pieces certainly have the potential to be a hodgepodge of gratuitous Photoshop effects, the execution of these concepts in the hands of Pozzi and his team feels organic and looks flawless.

More surreal design here and here and here.

Via Behance

Pozzi-1 Pozzi-2 Pozzi-3 Pozzi-4 Pozzi-5 Pozzi-6 Pozzi-7 Pozzi-8

%d bloggers like this: