Archives for posts with tag: chromatic

As designers we are all too familiar with the Pantone Matching System… the industry standard for classifying colors with an alphanumeric code, allowing for accurate recreation across media. We literally refer to it daily, and many designers can often rattle off Pantone numbers with great excitement and precision (we are guilty as charged). Brazilian-born, Madrid-based photographer Angélica Dass capitalizes on the familiarity of the Pantone system in her ongoing Humanæ Project, in an effort to “record and catalog all possible human skin tones.” This “chromatic inventory” is certainly a tall order, but Dass’s approach is a terrifically visually engaging way to broach the subject of social, cultural and racial identity, which is close to her heart. To date, Dass has indexed over 3,000 different shades from volunteers around the world (22 cities and 14 different countries on five continents, to be exact). Dass’s project has taken on a life of its own, even spawning educational and outreach programs developed by Dass herself. Not only do we love the concept, but Dass’s execution and philanthropic spirit really take it to the next level. Be sure to check out Dass’s TED Talk (here) to learn more about the origins and goal of this laudable project.

Via humanae.tumblr.com and Instagram

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On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

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