Archives for posts with tag: clothing

Time-based photography can be powerful and very telling. And few know this better than Danish photographer Peter Funch. For nearly a decade, Funch photographed the ritualistic exodus from (presumably) home to work. Funch took up a post just outside of Grand Central Station in New York City, as morning commuters scurried the streets of Manhattan in the morning hour between 8:30 and 9:30 AM. Just as his new book’s title states, Funch’s fastidious documentation took place at the corner of 42nd and Vanderbilt. During the editing process, Funch began to notice patterns… the same folks were being captured days, weeks and even years apart (and often wearing the same outfits). And, often, these familiar strangers were traveling in packs next to or near each other daily, paying little attention to one another, day after day, week after week. Funch’s work captures these fascinating patterns and really speaks to cliches about the daily grind, monotonous routines of daily life… about the proverbial rat race.

Via peterfunch.com and Instagram

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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It’s often said that fashion inspiration comes from a really wide and diverse assortment of sources, and we’re certain food is one of them. The work of San Francisco-based artist Gretchen Röehrs makes for a pretty amusing and rather literal interpretation of such influence. Röehrs dresses up her whimsical fashion sketches with a variety of foods, manipulating everything from artichokes to oyster shells, to mimic the lines and curves of clothing. Deliciously du jour, indeed.

Via Instagram

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Yes, we know, we know… animals taking on human characteristics is a bit gimmicky. It’s a practice that’s been around forever, and one that never ceases to rouse wonderment in the eyes of children the world over (and those young at heart, too). But this series by Barcelona-based photographer/filmmaker Yago Partal is somehow different. Partal captures the essence and perceived “personalities” of various animals through a fusion of photography and illustration in a really special way. His execution of this series, which began as just a few photos for a larger project, is flawless. In his own words, Partal comments in the third person: “Influenced since childhood by stories of wildlife, fashion and cartoons, he found his own voice in a game that many like to play: humanizing animals. The project, with no other pretentiousness than to have fun and set apart his work, tries to do something different….” The pairing of wardrobe with animal is both humorous and thought-provoking. We really love this ongoing series. Merch featuring these fantastic photos available here. This series brings to mind another collection of stellar artwork that depicts the humanization of animals (here).

Via zooportraits.com

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Dutch artist Guda Koster creates living sculptures with actual people, which result in these terrific photographs. Influences of fashion, interior design and even theater are evident in her work. In her own words, Koster’s work serves as social commentary: “I make installations, sculptures and photographs in which clothing plays an important part. Clothing doesn’t just have a function but also conveys a message. In our everyday lives we communicate identity and social position primarily by means of our clothing. Clothing can be seen as a visual art form that expresses the way we see ourselves and our relationship with the world around us.” The titles of these works include Red With White Dots, Cloud, Stairway to Heaven, Fear of Grey Mice, Girl, and Happy Birthday.

Via gudakoster.nl

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Yes, we are suckers for series, and we especially love this one. Brazilian designer/illustrator Frederico Birchal depicts famous figures from music, movies and television with just costumes. Birchal’s attention to detail really elevates this series. Awesome concept, excellent execution. Well done!

Via Behance

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Finnish installation artist Kaarina Kaikkonen creates art using, of all things, second-hand clothing. Her impressive large-scale installations explore symmetry and color in some really interesting ways. Her latest work, Are We Still Going On?, involves hundreds of children’s shirts hung in rows, meant to resemble the interior framework of a giant ship.

Via atpdiary.com and artinfo.com and sculptors.fi

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Nashville-based illustrator/designer/artist Derrick Castle (aka Straw Castle) started off designed t-shirts. With more exposure came more opportunities, and Castle has since gone on to illustrate designs for the likes of Kid Rock, John Mellencamp, Neil Young, and Def Leppard, among others. The details in his block printing are phenomenal. Be sure to also check out his Etsy shop.

Via strawcastle.com

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No, we’re not referring to the fantastical omnipresent electronic devices that have been embedded in our very culture. We’re referring to Apple’s short-lived clothing line from the mid-’80s. You can be sure knockoffs are just around the corner at your local Urban Outfitters.

Via mashable.com

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