Archives for posts with tag: collage

On this Election Day, we bring you some of our favorite works inspired by this historic election season. In order: Boston-based artist and collage master Molly Scannell; Brooklyn-based artist and educator David Hollier; Nashville-based artist and sculptor Herb Williams (previous posts here and here); Brazilian artist Butcher Billy (previous post here); Nashville-based (Rochester-born) painter Kristin Llamas. Politics as the subject of art has never been more prevalent. Whether it be the polarizing nature of this particular presidential election, or the reach of social media (probably both, actually), talented artists from all over the country and world have been churning our artwork inspired by this moment in history. Let’s just hope everyone is as energized to vote. Go vote!

Via Instagram, Instagram, Flickr, Behance and kllamas.com

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We really enjoy art, design and photography that makes you look twice… where things are not quite what they seem. Atlanta-based BBDO creative director Stephen McMennamy achieves this beautifully with an ongoing project he calls #ComboPhotos. Rather than employing Photoshop to seamlessly merge photos to create these juxtapositions, McMennamy simply stacks two separate photos with conceptual and compositional similarities. The result is often humorous and unexpected. He plays with scale in a really terrific way, and we particularly love that it’s not perfectly seamless. Very well done. We’re sure his almost 50,000 Instagram followers would agree.

Via Instagram

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Cubism, widely considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century, was pioneered by Picasso and Braque in the early 1900s. By definition, cubism is a style and movement in which perspective with a single viewpoint was abandoned and use was made of simple geometric shapes, interlocking planes, and even collage. Dutch artist Enno de Kroon takes this one step further, using the unique landscape of the universal egg carton to his advantage in what he calls “eggcubism”. de Kroon had always experimented with distortions of perspective, and he found that the egg carton as his canvas presented a new and unique challenge that forced him to approach painting in a new way. The challenge is not only limited to de Kroon as the creator, but the viewer’s perception is also challenged. de Kroon explains, “The waves of the egg cartons limit the viewer’s perception; they also make him aware of his positioning towards the image. The intentional limitation in subjective perception gives room for imagination and recall: the process of occlusion. By a fusion of direct and indirect perception conventional imagery is overtaken. At first sight this leads to a physical and mental incompleteness, that forces an integration which can only take place within the inner experience, apart from time and space. One could say that the complete image just emerges sublimated in the viewers mind. Gestalt psychology states that human perception aims for completeness. Perceptions are being added subconsciously. My eggcubist works evoke conscious and dynamic adding. The objects not only refer to themselves, they also refer to each other as a series.” In a digital age of augmented reality and immersive 3D experiences, de Kroon’s eggcubism pays homage to traditional cubism, with an interactive twist.

Via ennodekroon.nl and Flickr

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Trash versus treasure is all relative, as everyone pretty much knows by now. Rhode Island-based artist Tom Deininger takes the old adage to heart through his remarkable collage work. From idealistic landscapes (one of which is inspired by Impressionist master Monet), to detailed portraiture, to denim seascapes, to large-scale commissions, Deininger truly transforms found, often discarded, objects into things of beauty and awe. We imagine his workspace to look like The Island of Misfit Toys. It takes true skill, an acute sense of space and color, to compose these stunning pieces. To say that Deininger is an accomplished collage artist is an understatement. Incredible work.

More killer collage work here, here and here.

Via tomdeiningerart.com

 

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Collage is often thought of as an amalgamation of different materials. But for Brooklyn-based artist Mark Wagner, his ongoing collage work is almost always comprised of a single material: one dollar bills. But to simply refer to what he creates as collages probably doesn’t do them justice. Wagner’s work is extremely intricate and meticulous; he gives purpose to the placement of each shred of currency. We don’t doubt that whatever the material, Wagner could compose a masterpiece beyond our wildest imagination. But part of the intrigue here is certainly the taboo nature of destroying dollar bills. In his own words, Wagner discusses his choice of material: “The one dollar bill is the most ubiquitous piece of paper in America. Collage asks the question: what might be done to make it something else? It is a ripe material: intaglio printed on sturdy linen stock, covered in decorative filigree, and steeped in symbolism and concept. Blade and glue transform it-reproducing the effects of tapestries, paints, engravings, mosaics, and computers—striving for something bizarre, beautiful, or unbelievable… the foreign in the familiar.”

Be sure to also check out the terrific process video below.

Via markwagnerinc.com

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Collage work, though we’ve all created some form of it from an early age, is way more difficult than it looks… especially at a masterful level of fine art. Barcelona-based artist Sergio Albiac is one such master, who marries traditional media and generative computer code in unexpected ways. Albiac’s series “You are not in the news” explores the relationship between self-worth and media exposure. These compositions are striking, to say the least. And a glimpse into Albiac’s process makes them that much more special. In his own words: “When I code a generative sketch, I introduce control (the sentences that govern the sketching action) and also a degree of randomness in the code. This is a machine control/randomness balance. Then, I select certain outputs (again, human control) and I paint a canvas using the selected generative images as an starting point, without the aim of exact reproduction. The act of painting is a struggle between control and randomness because, depending of the painting technique, paint behavior cannot be totally controlled by the painter. In this way, I explore a fascinating “dialogue” between control/randomness and machine/human interaction. It makes sense to me. I feel connected to artistic tradition but using the generative sketchbook process, I can create in a very contemporary and innovative way that deeply reflects the ideas I need to express.” Just brilliant

Previous post about a very different approach to generative art here. And more collage work here.

Via sergioalbiac.com

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Istanbul-based designer/illustrator Selman HOŞGÖR has a distinctive collage style. We love how he merges vintage photography with illustration and typography. In less capable hands, this series could come across as rather pedestrian, novice work. But HOŞGÖR really hits the mark with these. Great balance of uniformity between each piece to come across as a true series. Could definitely see these evolving into other series… love his style.

Via Behance

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Rome-based artist Ekaterina Panikanova is an excellent illustrator and painter. But what makes his work really special is his use of books as canvas. Panikanova achieves a collage-like effect by lying these books open and flat while drawing on them. And the results are quite remarkable. We love the composition and overlapping textures.

Via ekaterinapanikanova.com

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California-based photographer/artist Cheryl Sorg takes collage work to a whole other level. Sorg sells these large (three foot tall) custom works, and tailors them to individuals. Customers provide their thumbprint, as well as a list of interests (much-loved books, music, films, poetry, quotes, places traveled and lived, etc.), then Sorg finds corresponding text and images, and trims them into strands, eventually forming a stunning thumbprint. Can’t begin to imagine how long something like this takes, but it’s an excellent idea, and really well done from what we can see.

Via cherylsorg.com

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We have all enjoyed making a collage of some sort, whether it be in preschool pasting random shapes together, or as an exercise in color and form in art school. But Florida-based artist Derek Gores raises the bar with his awe-inspiring collage work. These works on canvas are portraiture with a whole other level of detail and nuance. Amazing work

Via derekgores.com

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