Archives for posts with tag: collection

We’ve looked at double exposure photography many times before (here and here and here), but we’ve never seen analog work quite like this arresting series, Jarred & Displaced, by Finnish photographer Christoffer Relander. We often marvel at artists who choose more traditional or “old school” methods of art making, which is the case with Relander’s striking photos here. Rather than capturing his photos digitally, then quickly bringing them into Photoshop for manipulation, Relander takes to the dark room to work his magic. While each composite is brilliant by its own merits, Relander’s process somehow makes his work that much more precious. As if pouring his heart into these very personal photographs was not enough, Relander also collaborated with fellow Finnish photographer and filmmaker Anders Lönnfeldt on a simply exquisite short film about this project, which is a true work of art in and of itself. In his own words, Relander discusses this mysteriously beautiful ongoing project: “For over a year now I’ve been collecting landscapes in jars using analog double exposures—in this project I have realized a childish dream. I play with the idea of being an ambitious collector; conserving my environments into a large personal collection. Most landscapes are from where I grew up, in the countryside in the south of Finland, where my roots still lie. Separation anxiety to my childhood is simply what absorbed me into this project.”

Via christofferrelander.com

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On the heels of (no pun intended) the wildly popular Humans of New York series by Brandon Stanton, photographer Stacey Baker takes a slightly different approach, but in a similar vein. Baker, associate photo editor at The New York Times Magazine, takes to the streets and photographs women’s legs from the waist down. The collection as a whole, of meticulously composed shots, documents a dizzying diversity of figures and fashions, with these swift street encounters with perfect strangers. Baker has documented this series on social media, amassing almost 80,000 Instagram followers along the way. Her recently published book, NY Legs, is available for purchase (here).

Via Instragram and lensculture.com

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Barcelona design firm Hey Studio has a thing for pop culture and illustration. They married these two loves into a fruitful serial project (others here and here and here) that has boosted their social media presence to over 50K Instagram followers. Though the project, called EveryHey, seems to have since ceased, Hey Studio posted over 400 minimalist illustrations of a very wide variety of pop culture figures, from Prince to Parker Lewis, to Baywatch babes to Beyoncé. We love Hey Studio’s bold, colorful style, and their smart choice of details to make each illustration just recognizable. This is a very small sampling, so be sure to check out the entire collection online or in their EveryHey book (available here).

Via Instagram

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On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

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Accomplished Singapore-based art director/designer Thomas Yang has two passions in life: design and cycling. Yang merges the two (quite expertly, we might add) by way of this ongoing collection of limited edition cycling-related prints, aptly titled 100copies (sold here). You don’t have to be an avid cyclist to appreciate this brilliant work from Yang. His process involves a strategic use of bicycle tires as stamps, essentially creating bold renderings of architectural landmarks from around the world. So far, Yang has produced four different architectural designs — “The Cyclist’s Empire” (Empire State Building), “God Save the Bike” (Tower Bridge), “Bicycle Mon Amour” (Eiffel Tower) and “The Unforbidden Cyclist” (the Forbidden City) — among other items, like posters, tees, stickers and tote bags. We’re looking forward to seeing what Yang comes up with next.

Via 100copies.net

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