Archives for posts with tag: colorful

With the majesty of the changing seasons fully upon us, we thought it fitting to look at the stunning work of Los Angeles-based photographer/filmmaker Niaz Uddin. His awe-inspiring photographs of natural landscapes often shot from an aerial perspective, have a beautiful, supersaturated feel that capitalizes on gorgeous colors found in nature.

Via niazuddin.com and Instagram

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LEGO bricks are no longer just plastic construction toys, they have permeated all facets of pop culture lately… showing up on the silver screen, in video games, on clothing and even fine art. Classically trained Italian artist Stefano Bolcato has had such a penchant for the timeless toys since childhood that he began using them, and specifically the yellow minifigures, as subject matter for years. Recently, Bolcato took this a step further by reimagining classic paintings with LEGO figures in his series titled People. From Andy Warhol’s legendary Marilyn Diptych to Frida Kahlo’s Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird and Leonardo da Vinci’s Portrait of an Unknown Woman (La Belle Ferroniere), Bolcato’s oil paintings are fun and approachable. We’d love to see him expand on the series…. The possibilities are endless.

More LEGO art here and here and here.

Via stefanobolcato.com and Instagram

You may recognize Perler beads from your childhood. or perhaps your children (or you) enjoy these tactile “pixels” today, whose novelty bucks the digital trend. One thing is for sure, these tiny fusible plastic beads have an appeal that transcends age and skill level. Romanian artist Claudiu Alexandru takes beading to a whole new level, having spent some 85 hours and 45,000 beads with little more than a pair of tweezers (and lots of patience) on his latest masterpiece. The result is quite something.

Via Facebook

Barcelona design firm Hey Studio has a thing for pop culture and illustration. They married these two loves into a fruitful serial project (others here and here and here) that has boosted their social media presence to over 50K Instagram followers. Though the project, called EveryHey, seems to have since ceased, Hey Studio posted over 400 minimalist illustrations of a very wide variety of pop culture figures, from Prince to Parker Lewis, to Baywatch babes to Beyoncé. We love Hey Studio’s bold, colorful style, and their smart choice of details to make each illustration just recognizable. This is a very small sampling, so be sure to check out the entire collection online or in their EveryHey book (available here).

Via Instagram

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Legos and art have been crossing paths for years now (here and here and here). These colorful bricks that come in a vast spectrum of colors inspire not only young children, but also creative-thinking adults the world over. We are in awe of this brilliant ad campaign for Lego from a few years back, featuring highly minimalistic configurations of single-stud bricks depicting some of the most iconic paintings by masters from da Vinci to van Gogh. The human brain is truly intriguing. The fact that most people would recognize these works of art, with mere hints of details, really is amazing when we think about it. Kudos to Milan-based art director Marco Sodano for the clever concept and flawless execution.

Via Behance

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Upon quick initial inspection, it’s hard to tell what medium New York artist/photographer Sam Kaplan is working with. If you guessed sticks of chewing gum, you’d be right. Yes, these colorful, intricate, quite beautiful structures in the series he aptly calls Unwrapped are made of gum. We are big fans of art made from everyday objects (here and here and here), and Kaplan’s work fits nicely into that niche, but with a certain level of sophistication that really transforms the objects. We credit this to Kaplan’s superb implementation, not only by way of his thoughtful architectural prowess, but his masterful compositions and impeccable photography skills, which elevate each piece well beyond ordinary. This series would not be what it is in the hands of a less capable artist… we applaud Kaplan for his creative thinking and brilliant execution.

Via samkaplan.com and Instagram

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Organizing the Emerald City… #gumunwrapped

A post shared by Sam Kaplan (@samkaplanphoto) on

Minimalism is often just the right treatment for getting to the essence of a visual identity (previous examples here and here and here). And that is precisely the case with Minneapolis-based designer/art director Tony Buckland’s project, Birds of Minnesota. You don’t have to be into ornithology or bird watching to appreciate this work, there’s an aesthetic appeal that stands on its own. Buckland’s objective is to “edit the defining characteristics of each bird down to the absolute minimum without losing the essence of the bird.” And he achieves that brilliantly. An ever-growing collection of prints available here.

Via birdsofminnesota.com

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On this Earth Day, we thought it appropriate to feature work that promotes that trendy buzz word: upcycling. In other words, reusing objects that would otherwise be discarded in such a way as to create something of higher quality or value than the original. In this case, it’s the inventive work of UK photographer Dan Tobin Smith. For his project entitled The First Law of Kipple, Smith basically collected a very wide array of rubbish, then painstakingly chromatically arranged it with such attention, that he achieved pleasing gradients from color to color (no Photoshop filters here, folks). And we’re not talking a handful of objects, but thousands upon thousands. What’s this peculiar word “kipple”, you ask? It’s actually a fictional word that was coined by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick in his 1968 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (the film adaptation was Blade Runner), and is used to describe useless, pointless stuff that humans accumulate. It’s sort of odd even saying it, but Smith’s creative display of such junk is quite beautiful and thought-provoking. This project certainly appeals to our own nerdy desire for order and color harmony.

More chromatic-centric posts here and here and here.

Via dantobinsmith.com and Instagram

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Okay, this is admittedly rather geeky in a way only designers can appreciate, so we are naturally very taken with it. Berlin-based artist/designer/drinker James Edward Murphy developed this clock that corresponds the numbers of the time in a 24-hour clock with hexidecimal color values. Simple concept, but the result is sort of mesmerizing. Time-lapse visual here. Having used it for a little while, we love checking back randomly to see what color it is. To take things a step further, UK web guru Jonic Linley recently turned the clock into a Mac screen saver (download it here).

Via scn9a.org

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The late great David Bowie has been a cornerstone of pop culture for decades. So it’s no surprise that visual artists around the world have paid tribute to him and his chameleon-like persona over the years. Here’s a sampling of some of our favorites. R.I.P. David Bowie

 

Pablo Lobato (Buenos Aires)
Via Flickr
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Vincent Altamore (New Jersey, USA)
Via Blogspot

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Ed Chapman (London) see previous post here
Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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Marta Zawadzka (Poland)
Via martagallery.com

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Steve Payne (UK) see previous post here
Via Tumblr

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Karen Clark (New Jersey, USA)
Via Facebook

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