Archives for posts with tag: colorful

The late great David Bowie has been a cornerstone of pop culture for decades. So it’s no surprise that visual artists around the world have paid tribute to him and his chameleon-like persona over the years. Here’s a sampling of some of our favorites. R.I.P. David Bowie

 

Pablo Lobato (Buenos Aires)
Via Flickr
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Vincent Altamore (New Jersey, USA)
Via Blogspot

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Ed Chapman (London) see previous post here
Via edchapman-mosaics.co.uk

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Marta Zawadzka (Poland)
Via martagallery.com

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Steve Payne (UK) see previous post here
Via Tumblr

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Karen Clark (New Jersey, USA)
Via Facebook

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Though we would not necessarily describe ourselves, or our design philosophy as quirky, we can certainly appreciate an idiosyncratic design approach. Italian-based multidisciplinary design practice Mathery Studio seem to live and die by such an unconventional way of thinking, and it shows in their exceptional, and sometimes eccentric, work. Case in point is a recent project for Australian brand Odd Pears, which is in the business of selling creative and colorful mismatched socks. This campaign, Pull Them Up, is described as “a Monday to Friday guide to different ways to pull up your socks.” Mathery’s unique and humorous mode of expression is a perfect match (pun intended) for Odd Pears. In their own words, “In this campaign we focused on the act of ‘pulling up the socks’ and for five lucky Odd Pears trios we have designed a system which will allow every early morning-still-sleepy bird to get dressed in just one move.”

Via mathery.it

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We certainly have a thing for creative food photography (here and here and here), so it’s no surprise that the inventive work of London-based photographer David Sykes caught our eye. Sykes looks at food from an unconventional perspective, and we particularly like the subtle injection of humor in his work. In fact, it’s not exactly food photography, but food-like. His keen eye for composition and smart use of color prove that Sykes is more than a quirky photographer, but a terrific conceptual artist.

Via davidsykes.com

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While client-driven work can certainly be fulfilling and satisfying in many ways, there’s something to be said for personal projects. Sure, they can be a little indulgent, but the lack of constraints and pressure, at least from outside sources, often yields fantastic results. As designers, the process is sort of freeing, and can lead to good things all around. Argentinian art director and motion designer Javier Tommasi knows this all too well. His ongoing project, Food for Life, showcases the fruits (quite literally) of his unpaid labor. Tommasi has spent months of his free time exploring new techniques to improve the overall quality of his work, and we are totally impressed. Not just with his dedication to the process, but with the caliber of his work. His renderings are amazing, and his sense of composition and lighting really make these pieces sing. Tommasi speaks to the concept, “I love the set design, product photography, 3D animation and I just wanted to make a mix between all stuff I like, giving an artistic touch. So, playing and proving colors, textures and lights, I did the designs. I had the idea to work with stuff to make me feel something natural, fresh, with vivid colors, and I thought in fruits and vegetables. So. I resolved to do set designs with natural and fresh fruits and vegetables adding extra objects with different textures like metal and gold to see the contrast between them.”

Via javitommasi.com and howww.com

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Art with purpose and for social good can be really powerful. It can bring people together in unique ways that’s really touching, especially in this digitally connected, yet ironically isolating society we live in today. The work of Germen Crew, a Mexican youth organization comprised of muralists and street artists, to literally transform a village is a prime example. The government-sponsored project called Pachuca Paints Itself resulted in this magnificent mural, Mexico’s largest. Launched as an effort to not only rehabilitate the hillside neighborhood, but to also bring the community together, the Germen Crew project was a massive undertaking involving the painting of 209 individual houses. And the photos speak for themselves. Be sure to check out the video below (in Spanish). The vibrant, fluid composition seen from afar is truly awe-inspiring and heart warming. Just amazing.

Via Facebook and Instagram

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When you (literally and figuratively) hold a magnifying glass up to some of nature’s more diminutive wonders, some breathtaking sights are revealed. We’ve seen artists examine mushrooms, sand and even the human eye. Naturalist photographer Samuel Jaffe’s thing is caterpillars. Having grown up in Eastern Massachusetts with a distinct curiosity about the world around him and a penchant for photography, Jaffe’s development of a project to raise and photograph native caterpillars seems natural. Jaffe’s documentation of a variety of caterpillars on black backgrounds not only highlight the beautiful patterns and textures from a scientific and investigatory standpoint, they also make exquisite photographs all on their own. You might even catch a hint of personality from these other-worldly creatures in Jaffe’s amazing shots.

Via samueljaffe.com

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We know, we know… on paper it sounds, well, boring. Photos of mushrooms. Big deal. That very simplistic description does not come close to realizing the majesty Australian photographer Steve Axford captures in his work. Axford is a sort of photography explorer, not only capturing the natural world around him, but also surveying remote locations by way of macro photography to uncover the beauty of mushrooms and other fungi. Nature photography is often concentrated on much larger objects, so Axford’s artistic approach to what could otherwise be missed, and considered scientific subjects is pretty unique. In his own words, “My photography is an avenue into exploring this world… as it slows me down and allows me to look at things more closely. My interests cover everything from micro fungi to volcanoes, though more of my time now is spent with the fungi than the volcanoes. While doing this I have developed a passion for the way things fit together (the ecology). Nothing exists in isolation and the more you look, the more connections you find. Oddly enough, this fits with what I used to work at, as a designer and manager of large computer systems. Although the world is a far more complex than any man made computer system, the rules learned with one can be applied to the other.” Needless to say, we appreciate the unique beauty and investigative spirit in Axford’s work.

More macro photography here and here.

Via steveaxford.smugmug.com

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We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again… the proliferation of superhero movies in recent years has spawned all sorts of superhero art (here and here and here), which we are generally fond of. If art is a barometer for cultural consciousness, then fantasy and escapism seem to be at the forefront of people’s thoughts lately. Dubai-based fashion and portrait photographer Martin Beck, however, looks at these extraordinary characters and personas as rather ordinary, beyond their colorful costumes. Beck’s series, We Can Be Heroes, is a collection of superbly gritty portraits of regular people with regular struggles, who might not otherwise be viewed as heroes. Beck, in his own words: “When we think of superheroes, we think of perfect bodies and beautiful faces., achieving unbelievable feats. There are people we idealize as characters that can do no wrong and only seem to exist in our daydreams. This project tries to humanize superheroes. Despite our flaws and failures, each of us, in our own way, can be heroes to our family, our friends, our colleagues and we all have the potential to help others. My Heroes are regular people not restricted by race, religion or beliefs. They live among us, they surround us, they are everywhere. Everyone is a superhero.”

Via martinbeckphotography.com

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Given the abundance of fonts out there (many of which are often free), one would think that the tradition of lettering would be dead. But similar to the rise of vinyl in music these days, the opposite is actually true. Lettering is experiencing a sort of renaissance in the design community. Call it novelty or nostalgia, but there is something very special about lettering, especially in this era of (and we don’t particularly like this term) desktop publishing. Styles run the gamut, and we have an appreciation for the great variety of lettering work currently being done. We are particularly fond of London-based freelance digital letterer and illustrator Linzie Hunter. Her colorful, whimsical style has served an impressive list of clients very well. Those clients include New York Observer, Washington Post, Random House Publishing, Harper Collins, Scholastic, Hallmark, American Girl, Time Magazine, Wall Street Journal, Nike, and many more. Hunter’s work is really quite something… she has a distinct ability to make a heap of information engaging, and even beautiful. And her illustrations are fantastic too. What a talent!

Via linziehunter.co.uk

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A favorite pastime of many, during the holiday season and throughout the year, is assembling jigsaw puzzles. Children around the world usually start with an elementary 24-piece puzzle, and graduate to more advanced puzzles containing many more pieces. Australian artist/illustrator/designer Clemens Habicht has created perhaps one of the most difficult (and beautiful) puzzles we’ve ever seen. Even we as designers, who have a bit of an edge given our intimate knowledge in the nuances of color, see this is quite daunting. Rather than recreating an image, this puzzle requires you to assemble the pieces based on a CMYK color gamut. That’s right, a 1,000-piece puzzle made up of simple 1,000 different colored pieces. In his own words, Habicht discusses: “The idea came from enjoying the subtle differences in the blue of a sky in a particularly brutal jigsaw puzzle, I found that without the presence of image detail to help locate a piece I was relying only on an intuitive sense of color, and this was much more satisfying to do than the areas with image details. What is strange is that unlike ordinary puzzles where you are in effect redrawing a specific picture from a reference you have a sense of where every piece belongs compared to every other piece. There is a real logic in the doing that is weirdly soothing, therapeutic, it must be the German coming out in me. As each piece clicks perfectly into place, just so, it’s a little win, like a little pat on the back.” Sweet satisfaction, indeed. If/when we tackle this, we will be sure to post the result!

Via Tumblr and lamingtondrive.com

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