Archives for posts with tag: communication

We have long commented on the convergence of history and art. They are intrinsically intertwined, reliant on one another in many ways. So when an artist turns the documentation and storytelling aspect of said junction on its head, we surely take notice. For his series The American Revolution Revolution, Denver-based artist Shawn Huckins masterfully juxtaposes early American portraiture with social media jargon. Thoughtfully conceptualized and brilliantly executed, Huckins’s incredible work succeeds on so many levels. And it’s also important to note that these are physical paintings, should Huckins’s artistic ability ever come into question. Huckins is a superb American artist who is clearly inspired by American Neo-Classical painters, as well as more contemporary Pop artists. In his own words, Huckins explains the series: “The American Revolution was conceived through an exchange of a few well-formed ideas communicated in person and by handwritten letters. Imagine what George & Co. could have done with the Internet. Or not. Technology influences how much we know and what we believe, as well as how quickly and intelligently we convey our ideas. But does how we communicate govern the value of what we communicate? The physical act of typing very fast on small devices has undeniably impacted spelling, grammar, and punctuation, encouraging a degree of illiteracy that has become the new social norm. As goes our grammatical literacy, do our social and cultural literacies follow?”

Via shawnhuckins.com

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Design really is all about communication and education, whether its purpose is to sell, explain, or simply draw attention. In the case of this brilliantly clever self-initiated poster, the visuals do all the work to raise awareness of an often ignored issue facing sharks in their, well, house (more about that here). A collaborative effort between Italian-born, San Francisco-based 3D master Matteo Musci, and London creative studio, Featherwax, which specializes in retouching and CGI, this striking poster does a terrific job of immediately drawing the viewer in with its arresting visuals. Inspired by an iconic movie poster, this piece’s strength is in its irony. In their own words, the duo explains: “An in-house concept to promote awareness for shark-culling, and the number of sharks killed annually. Due to the demonization of sharks, it’s often an overlooked issue. The concept here is to compare the number of deaths each species cause each other, and visually turn that fear on its head. The Jaws poster naturally springs to mind, and can be viewed as a boat full of harpoon-guns.”

Jaws related posts here and here and here

Via Behance

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Original JAWS poster:

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Israeli-born, London-based graphic designer Noma Bar has a very specific style. Use of negative space may look simple or straightforward to most, but as any designer will tell you, to employ it really effectively is no easy task. And negative space is the cornerstone of Bar’s style, which is really saying something. Perhaps one of the best examples of Bar’s masterful work is an IBM campaign from a few years back, which is sure to be studied by designers for many decades to come. In his own words, Bar’s general philosophy is “maximum communication with minimum elements.” And IBM clearly (and smartly) tapped Bar for its Smarter Planet campaign for that very reason.

Via dutchuncleagency.blogspot.com

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